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Re: Woodcutting aggravation (aka "Lumber bummer")

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  • D Humberson
    Milord, If you are just trying for a smooth flat surface, try a long-body plane. They have various names, but basically are the ones at least a foot long. The
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 8, 1999
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      Milord,

      If you are just trying for a smooth flat surface, try a long-body plane.
      They have various names, but basically are the ones at least a foot long.
      The longer plane body makes for smoother, flatter surfaces.

      If you are working on the back of a bow, flat is not the question: you want
      to find and follow a single growth ring the entire length of the bow. For
      that, a flat base spokeshave is a much better tool.

      Plane irons and spokeshave blades need to be very sharp, but they also have
      specific properties which must be preserved in sharpening. Plane irons in
      particular should only be sharpened from one side, and should be stropped
      using rouge on glass, not leather. One of the tougher things to learn about
      sharpening irons is how to debur the back of the edge without setting a
      second side to the iron's edge.

      Worth it tho - very little compares to the feel of exactly the amount of
      wood you want, coming off the piece smoothly and crisply.

      Whew, is this ever a ramble! I'll post it anyhow, with a hope you find some
      part of this of value.

      Ragnar Ketilsson


      >From: F J Villafranca III <rev@...>
      >Reply-To: SCA-Archery@onelist.com
      >To: sca-archery@onelist.com
      >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Woodcutting aggravation (aka "Lumber bummer")
      >Date: Thu, 07 Oct 1999 21:46:11 -0500
      >
      ><< text2.html >> See copied text below
      ><< text3.html >>

      >The problem is that when I am cutting the wood (1" x 3" - 4" x 6'
      >usually) I have an ongoing unintentional "dips" at various areas of the
      >board. I have tried changing blade designs ie: "smooth-cutting....
      >rough-cutting, wood-cutting specific... etc. and am still experiencing dips
    • James W. Pratt Jr.
      The key to good cuts is a sharp blade. You my be using to much pressure and causing the blade to barrel cut. I use a band saw and with a dull blade, through
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 8, 1999
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        The key to good cuts is a sharp blade. You my be using to much pressure and causing the blade to barrel cut. I use a band saw and with a dull blade, through thick (3-6 inches on the little saw and 14-26 inches on the big saw) and tough wood like maple and ash the blade can be pulled off 1 to 4 inches for each saw. On a jigsaw/scrollsaw which cuts even slower than a band saw the feed rate of a 3 inch thick piece will be about an inch a min or slower.

        Try a real slow feed rate with a 3-4 teeth per inch blade. Watch around knots the blade will want to bend the most and differently when the wood density(toughness) changes.

        Get to a library and get a book on tuning jigsaw/scrollsaws. It will help.

        James Cunningham


        I have been using the jigsaw/scrollsaw
        James W. Pratt Jr. wrote:

        What tool are you using when you get the "dips"? James Cunningham
        On several occasions I have been working with lumberyard staves (most recently poplar, maple, ash). Toolwise I've been using a scroll/jig saw, Stanley Surform, and various rasps. An ongoing problem I have been experiencing is what has led me to seek opinions from others. The problem is that when I am cutting the wood (1" x 3" - 4" x 6' usually) I have an ongoing unintentional "dips" at various areas of the board. I have tried changing blade designs ie: "smooth-cutting.... rough-cutting, wood-cutting specific... etc. and am still experiencing dips. Any suggestions, ideas, or experiences that are beneficial will be greatly appreciated. Please reply privately or on the list if you feel others would benefit from it.
      • Håkan Hedrén
        ... Not exactly true....it depends on where in the tree your stave comes from or rather, the desired growth ring. Higly crowned staves (cut near the
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 30, 1999
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          D Humberson wrote:

          > From: "D Humberson" <dhumbers@...>
          >
          > Milord,
          >
          > If you are just trying for a smooth flat surface, try a long-body plane.
          > They have various names, but basically are the ones at least a foot long.
          > The longer plane body makes for smoother, flatter surfaces.
          >
          > If you are working on the back of a bow, flat is not the question: you want
          > to find and follow a single growth ring the entire length of the bow. For
          > that, a flat base spokeshave is a much better tool.

          <snip>

          Not exactly true....it depends on where in the tree your stave comes from or
          rather, the desired growth ring.
          Higly crowned staves (cut near the core with a severe curvature of the growth
          ring) will often benefit from a flatter surface even though growth rings are
          violated. The grain has to parallell the length of the limb as much as possible
          though to make a durable bow.. Last but not least the length of the bow and its
          draw weight plays an important factor as well.

          Having said that I must agree on the long planes for a flat surface. For
          working your way down to a single growth ring, try a not-too-dull knife. It
          works miracles on many conifers, slicing right through the spongy early wood but
          riding on the harder late wood.

          To prevent the spokeshave/drawknife from doing "dip-cuts", have you tried
          angling it a little sideways ? It has helped me a few times, but areas near
          pins/knots are tricky most of the time, that's when i tend to switch to the
          knife.

          Angus.
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