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Fletch size?

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  • cwilson@mhmh.org
    To what differing effect is there between a 3 feather and a 5 feather on an arrow? Not being a man of unlimited means, I have refrained from simply making a
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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      To what differing effect is there between a 3" feather and a 5" feather on
      an arrow?

      Not being a man of unlimited means, I have refrained from simply making a
      dozen arrows with differing field tip weights, spine weight and fletching
      types. Maybe one YOU have tested different feather sizes.

      More specifically, any effects at short ranges (40 or less) as compared to
      shooting 100 yards.

      -Caedmon
    • Francois Leclerc
      ... I personally have 5 inch fletches but never actually tried the 3 inch fletch. The other element is how high is your fletching. I have personnaly noticed
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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        > To what differing effect is there between a 3" feather and a 5" feather on
        > an arrow?
        > More specifically, any effects at short ranges (40 or less) as compared to
        > shooting 100 yards.

        I personally have 5 inch fletches but never actually tried the 3 inch fletch.
        The other element is how high is your fletching. I have personnaly noticed
        that my arrows drop considerably after 25 meters when using a high profile
        fletching. This is probably due to the level of drag of the feather. Therefore I
        would summarize that drag is a consideration with fletching.

        The good side is that the arrow does stabilize better with 5 inch fletch. I
        have also noticed that if one of my feather is damaged, the arrow starts
        wobbling big time.
      • Howpatn@cs.com
        In a message dated 2/6/02 1:13:15 PM Eastern Standard Time, cwilson@mhmh.org ... I asked a bowyer about this a while ago. His answer was the major difference
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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          In a message dated 2/6/02 1:13:15 PM Eastern Standard Time, cwilson@...
          writes:


          > To what differing effect is there between a 3" feather and a 5" feather on
          > an arrow?
          >

          I asked a bowyer about this a while ago. His answer was the major difference
          was drag. The bigger the fletch the more air resistance. I prefer the 3"
          round fletch because it produces less drag on the arrow.

          Howard


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Scott Jaqua
          There is no one correct answer here. The correct size is the one that puts the center of drag far enough behind the center of gravity to produce a stable
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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            There is no one correct answer here. The correct size is the one that puts
            the center of drag far enough behind the center of gravity to produce a
            stable flight. This will change depending on weight, diameter and length of
            the arrow. Longer and or heavier arrows require more fletching surface area
            then shorter or less massive arrows.

            Njall
            (son of a real life rocket scientist)

            Scott B. Jaqua

            SCA Link http://sjaqua.tripod.com

            Gaming Link http://www.geocities.com/sjaqua/
          • hanhebin
            ... I personally like and use 4 4 fletch for distances of 40 yards and less. I have found that for me this configuration is more forgiving than 5 3 fletch.
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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              > To what differing effect is there between a 3" feather and a 5"
              > feather on an arrow?
              >
              > More specifically, any effects at short ranges (40 or less) as
              > compared to shooting 100 yards.

              I personally like and use 4" 4 fletch for distances of 40 yards and
              less. I have found that for me this configuration is more forgiving
              than 5" 3 fletch.

              Michael
            • Howpatn@cs.com
              In a message dated 2/6/02 2:05:46 PM Eastern Standard Time, sjaqua@yahoo.com ... I would tend to disagree with you on that. Since I shoot a 30 tapered arrow
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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                In a message dated 2/6/02 2:05:46 PM Eastern Standard Time, sjaqua@...
                writes:


                > Longer and or heavier arrows require more fletching surface area
                > then shorter or less massive arrows.
                >

                I would tend to disagree with you on that. Since I shoot a 30" tapered arrow
                with a 125 gr. field tip and 3" fletches.

                Howard


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Scott Jaqua
                ... From: ... arrow ... There s nothing to disagree with how much more fletching is relative. Most SCA archers, with a proper shooting form
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: <Howpatn@...>
                  > > Longer and or heavier arrows require more fletching surface area
                  > > then shorter or less massive arrows.
                  > >
                  >
                  > I would tend to disagree with you on that. Since I shoot a 30" tapered
                  arrow
                  > with a 125 gr. field tip and 3" fletches.
                  >
                  > Howard

                  There's nothing to disagree with how much more fletching is relative. Most
                  SCA archers, with a proper shooting form and properly made arrows, could
                  actually use a 2 1/2 inch fletch. All I said is the you need enough
                  fletching to keep the center of drag behind the center of gravity. However,
                  what I left out is that you have to factor in the angle of attack on the
                  fletching. Besides spinning the arrow, a steep angle of attack also pushes
                  the center of drag back on the arrow.

                  The arrow only needs to be so stable for it to fly correctly. Addition
                  fletching adds excess drag and slows the arrow. The only upside of extra
                  fletching surface is that the arrow will be more forgiving of a bad release
                  by the archer.

                  Njall
                  (former profession archery instructor)

                  Scott B. Jaqua

                  SCA Link http://sjaqua.tripod.com

                  Gaming Link http://www.geocities.com/sjaqua/
                • Howpatn@cs.com
                  Thanks for the clarification. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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                    Thanks for the clarification.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • schizeckinosy
                    I have read that the more center shot your bow, the less fletch you can get away with, which makes perfect sense to me. I tend to use 4 shield fletches, eith
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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                      I have read that the more center shot your bow, the less fletch you
                      can get away with, which makes perfect sense to me. I tend to use 4"
                      shield fletches, eith 3 or 4 at a time depending on what bow or
                      shooter the arrows are for.

                      Lu-shan
                    • James De Warrenne
                      I have made 11/32 shaft, 30 inch long, 125 grain tips, and have used 3,4 and 5 inch fletches. I was using a 30# fiberglass bow with the 3 inch and experienced
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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                        I have made 11/32 shaft, 30 inch long, 125 grain tips, and have used 3,4 and
                        5 inch fletches. I was using a 30# fiberglass bow with the 3 inch and
                        experienced slight wobble till it got about 10 yards out. The 4 inch out of
                        the same bow wobbled about 5-6 yards.

                        Now I use a 43# ELB with the 5 inch roundback fletches. I find that with a
                        40-50# spined shafts my shots were going a lot left. Now, I use 30-35#
                        shafts, 5 inch roundback and have a much tighter group, closer to center,
                        and much less wobble.

                        From what I can tell, the wider the bow, the further the arrow is from
                        center, and thus you need a slightly less spine weight for it to curve
                        around the bow properly.

                        I am now making my 7th dozen arrows. These will be 11/32 30# spine, 30 inch
                        draw, 125 grain tips, right wing feathers, 5 inch long, tapered to 1/2 inch
                        high, hide glue and linen tied with right hand twist.

                        I'll let you know how they fly.

                        James


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