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Re: [SCA-Archery] Straight vs. Not Straight

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  • Dave AKA Morgan
    ... I have never done an official scientific test on the subject. But, I noticed after I started helically fletching my arrows that my accuracy seemed to
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 5, 2002
      >Has anyone ever sat down and actually experimented by comparing straight
      >vs.
      >helical fletching of feathers?
      >
      >-Caedmon

      I have never done an official scientific test on the subject. But, I noticed
      after I started helically fletching my arrows that my accuracy seemed to
      improve.

      Works for me. *shrug*

      Morgan

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    • jrosswebb1@webtv.net
      Greetings, I too, cannot believe the claim of three revolutions in 6 inches ( I m not saying it isn t so, but it sure is hard to believe). Are you sure it
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 5, 2002
        Greetings,
        I too, cannot believe the claim of three revolutions in 6 inches (
        I'm not saying it isn't so, but it sure is hard to believe). Are you
        sure it didn't say in 6 feet? I'm gong through my copy of the "Witchery
        of Archery" by good old Maurice and I can't find it in there. Is it in
        there or in an article or letter that he wrote?
        I personally prefer helical fletching with a heavy arrow and a
        heavy arrow head. Most don't agree with me on this, but it really works
        well for me. I shoot a real heavy draw bow and I get great range and
        speed and a real flat trajectory at 100 yards. For most of the ranges
        that we shoot at in the SCA the targets aren't so far away that the loss
        of range is an issue, and I feel that the increased spin of a helical
        fletching significantly improves accuracy, even for those shooting light
        weight bows but that's a personal call.
        As for me, I'm a right handed shooter that shoots only left wing.
        Why? Because they are cheaper and I go through a lot of arrows. (Good
        enough reason, eh?)
        BTW, does any one know why "right wing" are more expensive? (I can just
        feel a "Conservative" joke coming)
        Later, fellow archery folk,
        -Geoffrei


        http://community.webtv.net/jrosswebb1/EASTWINDStribal
      • Guy Taylor
        The legend is that the average fellow that trims turkey wings so they won t fly the coop is right handed. Due to the way they grab the bird the right wings
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 5, 2002
          The legend is that the average fellow that trims turkey wings so they won't
          fly the coop is right handed. Due to the way they grab the bird the right
          wings are the ones that get trimmed, thus rendering right wing feathers a
          bit more scarce.

          Taillear


          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: jrosswebb1@... [mailto:jrosswebb1@...]

          > BTW, does any one know why "right wing" are more expensive? (I can just
          > feel a "Conservative" joke coming)
          > Later, fellow archery folk,
          > -Geoffrei
        • Susan Kell
          (Phelan asked) Just to throw another log on the which is better, right or left fletch fire that is near and dear to many of us fletchers, in kyudo (Japanese
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
            (Phelan asked)

            Just to throw another log on the "which is better, right or left
            fletch" fire that is near and dear to many of us fletchers,
            in kyudo (Japanese archery), they shoot two arrows, one is right
            fletched and the other is left fletched. This makes for good
            use of all of the feathers. Has anyone ever wondered why
            right fletches generally cost more even though there should be
            an equal supply of both right and left fletches?

            (and Ygraine replies...)

            I have heard that turkey farmers clip the right wings of their "crop" to
            prevent them flying away. Combine this with the myth of right-handed
            archers should use right-wing fletch, left-handed should use left-wing, and
            the fact that there are more right-handed than left-handed people. The
            reduction in the supply of right-wing feathers, plus the higher demand for
            them, results in their higher price.

            Unless specifically requested to do otherwise, Li and I use only left-wing
            fletch. The handedness of the archer does not require the fletching to
            match, but the nock point and shelf of the bow *do* need to be set up
            appropriately.

            -- Ygraine
          • Nest verch Tangwystyl
            Greetings all, I found this listing while wandering around on ebay. A very light weight British Long Bow is not easy to find. This would be a great first bow
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 7, 2002
              Greetings all,

              I found this listing while wandering around on ebay. A very light weight
              British Long Bow is not easy to find. This would be a great first bow for
              some petite person who wants to try this style of shooting. Note the draw
              length is also short.

              I am not affiliated with Mr. St. Charles, who is selling the bow. I do
              have one of his bows which has been serving me well for years. I just
              thought I would point out this unusual find.

              Nest

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