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Re: [SCA-Archery] Verdigris

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  • blkknighti@aol.com
    I have no documentation readily available but it seems all of us concerned with this topic have trouble providing specific reference. I would like to add
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 19, 2001
      I have no documentation readily available but it seems all of us concerned
      with this topic have trouble providing specific reference.
      I would like to add information (good or bad yet to be determined) I have
      come across. I wrote a short article on this some years ago.

      It is documented that 15th century arrows used this stuff.

      Verdigris is not actually a "insecticide" but a fungicide. That is, not to
      deter insects but more for rot by molds and fungus. Really a minor difference
      in the two I guess. Generally as a preservative.
      Used on wood furniture, chests, cupboards (esp. seagoing or in damp areas)
      One method to produce it was to collect the green "patina" (copper sulfate/or
      chloride) cupricon copper brass or bronze (all contain copper)..sometimes
      "forced" by exposing materials to sea air. This material was then heated in
      vinegar until only the crystals remain (cupric acetate)and then powdered in
      mortar with pestle. Powder added to vehicle for whatever specific purpose.
      Middle English vertegrez, from Old French verte grez, alteration of
      vert-de-Grice.
      Verd, green + Grice, Greece (possible in association with bronze age.)
      Verdigris was also used a a pigment in period paint and is poisonous so be
      careful.
      On arrows- verdegris is mixed with glue (hide, fish etc), arrow shaft dipped
      part way (approx. 1/3? from the back) in solution, left to dry untill tacky,
      fletchings hand aligned and attached, optionally whipped (proper term for the
      thread holding the fletching) and then {after possibly verdigris brushed on
      over the whipping} and set to dry thoroughly.
      I have done it and it works. Not as good as more modern method -fleching tape.

      Im sure some of this info came from/verified by Geoffrey St. Albin-You here
      Geoff? Help us out.
      Some info came from a chemist friend.
      Some from several books offhand would be hard pressed to provide.

      Sorry for the rushed form ...but Im well a little rushed! ;)

      Richard
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