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Re: Fixing bow with set

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  • James Koch
    I recently bought a bow via Ebay. It is a youth bow for a tiny local lady who has been borrowing one of my 15 pound kids bows. She was unable to draw any of
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 14, 1999
      I recently bought a bow via Ebay. It is a youth bow for a tiny local lady
      who has been borrowing one of my 15 pound kids bows. She was unable to
      draw any of my grown up equipment, even the wimpy long bow I loaned out to
      a 16 year old girl at Pennsic. The woman in question has a 25 inch draw.
      I figured with a bit of practice she ought to be able to pull a bow rated
      25 pounds at 25 inches and compete in most shoots. This is exactly what is
      written on the riser of the bow I obtained from Ebay. Unfortunately when I
      placed it on a bow scale I got 19 pounds at 25 inches. It has quite a bit
      of curve without the string and I figure it must have been left strung for
      a long period of time and has consequently taken a set. I'm sure the woman
      will like it. It's a beautiful straight shooting little Eastern European
      looking bow with nice faux horn nocks on the tips. However, she will
      probably soon want that extra missing 5 to 6 pounds of draw.
      >
      Has anyone out there had any luck retillering such a bow. This is a 1970s
      vintage wood and fiberglass recurve. I have retillered all wood bows
      before, but have never had experience with composites. I figure I can
      flatten it out by simply clamping it to a board, but don't know if I'll
      gain anything for the effort, or how long I'll have to wait.
      >
      Jim Koch
      James Koch
    • WUNERFUL@xxx.xxx
      Hi James, I too, have never tillered a composit, so I don t know how much success you will have clamping. You were going to heat as well as clamp, were nt you?
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 22, 1999
        Hi James,
        I too, have never tillered a composit, so I don't know how much success you
        will have clamping. You were going to heat as well as clamp, were'nt you?
        Other directions you might think in are, adding an additional backing layer
        to increase stiffness, decreasing string wieght (via building a string with
        fastflight insatead of dacron), or even shortening the bow an inch or two off
        each limb and cutting in new nocks.

        Consider also, that if a light arrow is used (and a 25" arrow will have
        less wieght than a 28" one) you might get the equivalent cast out of the bow,
        making it a practical shooter. (I don't know if there is a minimum wieght
        required for the bow, most times I've shot the marshal just looks at what is
        stamped on by the manufacturer.)

        Hope this helps!
        Craig
      • Karl Sandhoff
        I have to keep warning people about this. I ve shot since the early days of Kevlar, the first of the high-performance string materials. Before using Kevlar,
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 22, 1999
          I have to keep warning people about this. I've shot since the early days
          of Kevlar, the first of the high-performance string materials. Before
          using Kevlar, FastFlite, or any other high-performance string, make sure
          that the bow is rated for it. If the bow is not the question is not if,
          but when and how violently it will fail. Dacron, like the natural
          fibres, has a degree of stretch built in which relieves the shock at the
          end of the bow's travel. This cushions the bow and allows a controlled
          absorbtion of the energy. The high-performance strings have all the
          stretch of a steel cable and transfer all of the bow's remaining energy
          directly to the limbs. I've seen bows built for these strings shatter
          because of an undetected, microscopic, internal flaw. If the intent is
          to get a lighter wieght string, use a flemish twist. This type of string
          can generally be made with about 1/3 fewer strands than a continuous loop
          string of the same strength. Otherwise use a silk string, this is the
          strongest string per ounce I know of. Be aware, however, that in either
          case you may need to change your arrow nocks as they may now be too loose
          to firmly hold the string.
          Carolus von Eulenhorst

          On Wed, 22 Sep 1999 22:39:46 EDT WUNERFUL@... writes:
          >From: WUNERFUL@...
          >
          >Hi James,
          > I too, have never tillered a composit, so I don't know how much
          >success you
          >will have clamping. You were going to heat as well as clamp, were'nt
          >you?
          >Other directions you might think in are, adding an additional backing
          >layer
          >to increase stiffness, decreasing string wieght (via building a string
          >with
          >fastflight insatead of dacron), or even shortening the bow an inch or
          >two off
          >each limb and cutting in new nocks.
          >
          > Consider also, that if a light arrow is used (and a 25" arrow will
          >have
          >less wieght than a 28" one) you might get the equivalent cast out of
          >the bow,
          >making it a practical shooter. (I don't know if there is a minimum
          >wieght
          >required for the bow, most times I've shot the marshal just looks at
          >what is
          >stamped on by the manufacturer.)
          >
          >Hope this helps!
          >Craig
          >
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        • WUNERFUL@xxx.xxx
          You make excelent points, Karl, which I probably should have mentioned. I didn t, though, because we re talking about a bow at 19#, trying to tweek it to 25#.
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 22, 1999
            You make excelent points, Karl, which I probably should have mentioned. I
            didn't, though, because we're talking about a bow at 19#, trying to tweek it
            to 25#. Other things not mentioned were the likelyhood of the bow quickly
            returning to a set after straightning, weakening of the limbs from repetetive
            re-bending, etc...
            I don't use fastflight on any of my bows for the very reasons you stated.
            And after more thought, using less dacron is a much better solution. As far
            as silk goes, I didn't think of that one! Good call!
            The next rounds on me!
            Craig
          • Carl West at home
            ... I would recommend not trying to un-do the set in the bow, That s what the wood did, it ll do it again (if it doesn t blow up first. Years ago, I tried to
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 3, 1999
              James Koch wrote:
              >
              > From: James Koch <alchem@...>
              >
              > I recently bought a bow via Ebay. It is a youth bow for a tiny local lady
              > who has been borrowing one of my 15 pound kids bows. She was unable to
              > draw any of my grown up equipment, even the wimpy long bow I loaned out to
              > a 16 year old girl at Pennsic. The woman in question has a 25 inch draw.
              > I figured with a bit of practice she ought to be able to pull a bow rated
              > 25 pounds at 25 inches and compete in most shoots. This is exactly what is
              > written on the riser of the bow I obtained from Ebay. Unfortunately when I
              > placed it on a bow scale I got 19 pounds at 25 inches. It has quite a bit
              > of curve without the string and I figure it must have been left strung for
              > a long period of time and has consequently taken a set. I'm sure the woman
              > will like it. It's a beautiful straight shooting little Eastern European
              > looking bow with nice faux horn nocks on the tips. However, she will
              > probably soon want that extra missing 5 to 6 pounds of draw.
              > >
              > Has anyone out there had any luck retillering such a bow. This is a 1970s
              > vintage wood and fiberglass recurve. I have retillered all wood bows
              > before, but have never had experience with composites. I figure I can
              > flatten it out by simply clamping it to a board, but don't know if I'll
              > gain anything for the effort, or how long I'll have to wait.

              I would recommend not trying to un-do the set in the bow, That's what
              the wood did, it'll do it again (if it doesn't blow up first. Years ago,
              I tried to un-set my 60# fiberglass-backed lemonwood bow by gently
              flexing it backward and soon thereafter it failed catastrophically. _At_
              inspection at Pensic. The upper limb just bent right over.)

              How long is the bow? how much set does it have? Shortening it is
              probably the best route. Even better would be to try a different bow. :/

              Fritz

              --
              Carl West
              mailto:eisen@...
              http://people.ne.mediaone.net/eisen

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