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RE: Width of stock at crossbow nut

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  • Tom Guldin
    I would think it would depend on how the nut is mounted, where the force of the pod is being felt. If the nut is mounted on a shaft, and not in contact with
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 21, 2001
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      I would think it would depend on how the nut is mounted, where the force of
      the pod is being felt. If the nut is mounted on a shaft, and not in
      contact with the front of the socket, then force of the pod in on this
      shaft so the side plates of the crossbow would need to be thicker to handle
      the force. If the nut is contacting the front of the socket, essentially
      using it for a bearing surface, then there is virtually no force on any
      shaft which would be there only as a retaining rod to keep the nut in the
      socket and the side plates could be thinner.

      Marcus von Gallen
      COA, Scorpions Hollow

      Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2001 09:15:45 -0500
      From: Siegfried Sebastian Faust <eliwhite@...>
      Subject: Width of stock at crossbow nut

      In my inquisitive mind, I'd been pondering something, and wanted to know if
      others had pondered the same?

      Most all roller nut crossbows I have seen have a stock built such that the
      stock is wider than the nut at that point. For example, my own that I have
      built has a 1.5" stock with a 1.25" nut, leaving 1/8" on either side.

      Now I have seen many methods used to make the creation of this socket
      easier (such as using a forstner bit to drill it from one side, then
      'replace' the one side with a plug; or drilling it all the way through then
      replacing both sides, etc.)

      But something hit me. some crossbows I have seen (both period, and
      recreations) have VERY LITTLE, if hardly any of a width there. Mostly
      those that have nice rounded sides, and therefore come up to a 'point' at
      the nut.

      So my thought was ... is there a NEED, (other than 'look') for having width
      there? If you only made your stock 1.25" wide, could you drill the whole
      thing, put the nut in, place metal side plates on the sides, and it work
      just fine?

      The only possible drawback that I have thought of is that the string would
      'slightly' ride on the metal sideplate, but as long as it was nice and
      smooth, I don't see a problem myself.

      Siegfried




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      Barony of Highland Foorde http://highland-foorde.atlantia.sca.org/



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    • alberic
      ... Greetings: Period x-bows didn t use shafted nuts. They used the fore surface of the nut socket as a bearing, thus spreading the load around, instead of
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 21, 2001
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        >I would think it would depend on how the nut is mounted, where the force of
        >the pod is being felt. If the nut is mounted on a shaft, and not in
        >contact with the front of the socket, then force of the pod in on this
        >shaft so the side plates of the crossbow would need to be thicker to handle
        >the force. If the nut is contacting the front of the socket, essentially
        >using it for a bearing surface, then there is virtually no force on any
        >shaft which would be there only as a retaining rod to keep the nut in the
        >socket and the side plates could be thinner.
        >
        >Marcus von Gallen
        >COA, Scorpions Hollow
        >

        Greetings:

        Period x-bows didn't use shafted nuts. They used the fore surface of
        the nut socket as a bearing, thus spreading the load around, instead
        of concentrating it as shafted nuts do. As far as thickness goes,
        you can indeed do just exactly what the original poster suggested,
        and just drill through, and add metal side plates. Many SCA
        crossbows are done exactly this way.

        Speaking as someone who's done the "forstner bit-then plug" routine,
        please remember to turn your plug out of the thickness of a board, so
        that the grain runs across the plug, rather than down its
        cylindrical axis. (It'll match better that way, both in looks, and
        (more importantly) in the direction it expands with moisture.)

        I usually make my bows very curvey and thicker at the lock, but
        that's more a style issue: I *like* curvey bows, and it's a great way
        to show off the fact that they weren't made from 2x4's.
        My surmise is that the period bows that were so much thicker at the
        lock were done this way for several reasons. (A) the curve makes a
        pretty good hand rest. (B) style & (C) to provide support for the
        spanning device, which typically had bearings out beyond the lock,
        and therefore all the load had to transfer through that area. Thus
        it needed to be beefy enough to support the frequently *serious*
        loads.


        FWIW
        Alberic.
        --
        ---
        The paranoid fears that there is a dark, evil conspiracy attempting
        to control the world. The cynic fears they already have.
      • Scott Jaqua
        ... What I do, is to drill through with a forstner bit and then inlet around the hole to about a 1/4 depth. I then inly a piece of contrasting wood to create
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 22, 2001
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          > Speaking as someone who's done the "forstner
          > bit-then plug" routine,
          > please remember to turn your plug out of the
          > thickness of a board, so
          > that the grain runs across the plug, rather than
          > down its
          > cylindrical axis. (It'll match better that way,
          > both in looks, and
          > (more importantly) in the direction it expands with
          > moisture.)

          What I do, is to drill through with a forstner bit and
          then inlet around the hole to about a 1/4" depth. I
          then inly a piece of contrasting wood to create a
          decorative side plate. This produces a very pretty and
          stable socket area. I learned this procedure by
          looking at Master Iolos bows.

          Njall

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