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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Flemish Twist

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  • jrosswebb1@webtv.net
    Please let me clarify something. I had previously stated that I prefer a double twist to a triple twist on the flemish strings that I make. I shoot very heavy
    Message 1 of 11 , May 23, 2001
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      Please let me clarify something. I had previously stated that I prefer a
      double twist to a triple twist on the flemish strings that I make. I
      shoot very heavy pondage bows 70# - 93# and I make strings that are at
      least 18 strands. For a double twist, I use two groups of 9 strands and
      for a triple I would use three groups of 6 strands. There is no
      difference in the amount of string material, but there is a slight
      difference in performance. The double seems to shoot faster, and it's
      easier to make.
      Regarding twisting the string to shorten it: you CAN over twist a
      string and this will put undo stress on the string material and it will
      break. A well made string shouldn't be twisted so that it looks like a
      screw (I've seen that on the range).
      There should be a nice diagonal twist of no tighter than about 60
      degrees.
      Who knows why serving goes. You should replace it when it shows
      wear. Always inspect your strings for wear especially around the nocks
      (that's where they seem to go first). I carry at least two extra strings
      with me when I go to an event because, you never know....
      Sometimes a string can last a year or more and sometimes I've had to
      change them 3 or 4 times in a year.
      Wax, always wax. There is no such thing as too much wax on a
      string. It will save you a lot of heartache down the road. Also keep
      waxing your bow with paste wax especially if you shoot a lot out of
      doors. Water is your enemy.
      For my period D-section longbow, I make a flemish string with one
      loop and tie a bowyers knot (timber hitch) on the other side. It looks
      more period and also
      my 93# longbow is 76" long and beyond
      the length that I can make on my flemish string jig.
      I completely agree with an earlier posting about leaving a bow
      strung. I would never leave one of my bows strung. You can do what you
      want,but if you leave a 45# bow strung for any length of time, it may
      not be a 45# bow any more. It will take a set, lose poundage and
      performance. With self bows it is sometimes the practice of relaxing the
      bow whenever there is a break in the shooting so that the bows don't
      take a set.
      Many bowyers brag that their bows won't take a set if left strung, but
      why take the chance. Leaving a laminated bow strung in your car or hot
      tent in the summer months can have disastrous results. You'll be looking
      for a new bow.
      Respectfully,
      -Geoffrei


      http://community.webtv.net/jrosswebb1/EASTWINDStribal
    • Co tenBroek and Barbara Hendrix
      Jean-Michel delurking here momentarily: I ve noticed several posts regarding strings, I make my own, and also make some for others. I rely heavily on the work
      Message 2 of 11 , May 24, 2001
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        Jean-Michel delurking here momentarily:
        I've noticed several posts regarding strings, I make my own, and also make
        some for
        others. I rely heavily on the work of Tim Baker, which you can find in the
        Traditional
        Bowyer's Bible Vol II pg187.

        > Please let me clarify something. I had previously stated that I prefer a
        > double twist to a triple twist on the flemish strings that I make. I
        > shoot very heavy pondage bows 70# - 93# and I make strings that are at
        > least 18 strands. For a double twist, I use two groups of 9 strands and
        > for a triple I would use three groups of 6 strands. There is no
        > difference in the amount of string material, but there is a slight
        > difference in performance. The double seems to shoot faster, and it's
        > easier to make.

        If you choose to use more than 7 strands per plie, the inside strands simply
        put
        aren't doing anything. They just add mass to the string. String Mass will
        affect
        the cast of your arrows, and to some extent the noise of your bow.

        >M'lord's bow is loud, with a very definite *TWANG-ZIP*
        >when he shoots. i thought it was normal for a 'siege
        >weapon' (his words), but when i commented on another,
        >similar sounding bow yesterday, i was told that it was
        >because the *string* was noisy. So i asked what makes
        >strings noisy (with an eye to quietening my strings so
        >more energy is channeled to kinetic rather than
        >sonic), and was told it was because the strands were
        >vibrating independently (or summat like that). But
        >that wouldn't apply to a tight-twisted flemish, would
        >it?

        I would start by using a havier arrow. Most people who shoot
        come from the world of Camshafted bows, and think that anything
        over the weight of a heavy sewing needle is too much. After checking
        the weight I would look at the string. How many strands are in it, what
        type
        of string and string material.

        >... Most flemish strings i've seen for
        > sale seem to have lose twists, maybe 1 or 2 twists to
        > the inch, rather than the 5-8 twists i aim for, and i
        > just don't like the look

        Comercial strings use as little material as possible to get a margin of
        safety.

        > Who knows why serving goes.
        Friction.

        > You should replace it when it shows
        > wear. Always inspect your strings for wear especially around the nocks
        > (that's where they seem to go first). I carry at least two extra strings
        > with me when I go to an event because, you never know....
        > Sometimes a string can last a year or more and sometimes I've had to
        > change them 3 or 4 times in a year.

        Anyone not carrying extra strings (I have 1, plus the ability to make more)
        is asking not to shoot one weekend.

        >Wax, always wax. There is no such thing as too much wax on a
        > string. It will save you a lot of heartache down the road. Also keep
        > waxing your bow with paste wax especially if you shoot a lot out of
        > doors. Water is your enemy.

        Let the congregation say AMEN.

        >For my period D-section longbow, I make a flemish string with one
        > loop and tie a bowyers knot (timber hitch) on the other side. It looks
        > more period and also
        > my 93# longbow is 76" long and beyond
        > the length that I can make on my flemish string jig.

        Where did you get your bow? Who made it? and What wood is it made of?

        I apologize for the length of the reply.
        Jean-Michel d'Aix en Provence
        MKA Co tenBroek
      • AyllythPìobaire
        ... camshafted bows ? The only archery we know is SCA archery. ... He shoots the larger diametre shafts (i know there are two common diametres for shafts -
        Message 3 of 11 , May 30, 2001
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          --- Co tenBroek and Barbara Hendrix
          <co_barb@...> wrote:
          > I would start by using a havier arrow. Most people
          > who shoot
          > come from the world of Camshafted bows, and think

          'camshafted bows'? The only archery we know is SCA
          archery.

          > that anything
          > over the weight of a heavy sewing needle is too
          > much. After checking
          > the weight

          He shoots the larger diametre shafts (i know there are
          two common diametres for shafts - 5/16 and 11/32? -
          and i required the thinner shaft whilst his bow
          requires the heftier one). i know from experience that
          his arrows are too weighty for my puny wee 35# to
          shoot well. ;)

          > I would look at the string. How many
          > strands are in it, what
          > type
          > of string and string material.

          two-ply flemish, 7 strands per, and whatever the
          common string material is (it's not linen; dacron?)
          that feels waxy already. Well-waxed during
          construction, but definitely needing wax now.

          > > Who knows why serving goes.
          > Friction.

          Amusing, considering he has only one arrow with a
          locking nock, and the other arrows have a nasty habit
          of falling off the string as he draws (he is slowly
          losing sensation in his fingers, and can't tell how
          hard he's gripping the nock; i suspect he's erring on
          the side of loosely so as not to interfere with the
          arrow).

          > Anyone not carrying extra strings (I have 1, plus
          > the ability to make more)
          > is asking not to shoot one weekend.

          Strings are so easy to make, too!

          > the road. Also keep
          > > waxing your bow with paste wax especially if you
          > shoot a lot out of
          > > doors. Water is your enemy.
          >
          > Let the congregation say AMEN.

          Huzzah! My puir bow got drizzled on, along with my
          idiot arrows, during breakdown at the end of war.
          Sigh.


          =====
          8) Ayllyth P�obaire 8)
          House of the Argent Greyhound (http://www.geocities.com/ayllyth/ )
          Barony of Calafia, Kingdom of Caid
          For your next feast and/or revel, visit
          http://www.thewildoats.com !

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