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Re: [SCA-Archery] Another question

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  • Brad Boda d'Aylward
    Subject: [SCA-Archery] Another question ... Lay on your side on the couch while watching TV and pull a five lb. weight off the floor to your anchor roint.
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 30 4:56 PM
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      Subject: [SCA-Archery] Another question


      >I would like to thank everyone for the info about draw weight and care of
      >my bows, but now I have another question:
      >
      >is there any exercises that will help with the back and shoulder muscles? I
      >noticed that just after 2 days of shooting my shoulder and neck muscles are
      >extremely sore and tight.


      >Lady Phoebe apo Korinthos, AoA
      >i syzygos II apo HL Martinus Draco Byzantios
      >Domus Draco Byzantios
      >Exchequer for Kolegio Bellewode
      >Basileio Calontir
      >
      >mka Trudy Monet
      >
      Lay on your side on the couch while watching TV and pull a five lb. weight
      off the floor to your anchor roint.
      Repeat X times.

      Brad
    • Walter Davis
      Greetings Ken, As far as being easier to pull a longbow or recurve of the same poundage will take the same amount of strength to pull. As far as being
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 29, 2001
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        Greetings Ken,

        As far as being easier to pull a longbow or recurve of the same poundage
        will take the same amount of strength to pull. As far as being smoother,
        usually the longer bow be it longbow or recurve will be smoother. This is
        not always the case though. I have a 62" composite longbow that has the
        smoothest pull of all my bows. A longbow can be a composite. The bow I use
        in tournament is a 70" composite longbow made of yew, bamboo, and clear
        fiberglass.

        A 30" draw is not short. The average man has a 28" draw. That is why most
        bow weights are measured at 28" and arrow spines are figured for a 28"
        arrow. I beleive the old "clothyard arrow" you read about is only the
        writers attempt to embellish his story. No yard long medeivel arrows have
        been found as far as I know.

        At your service,
        Lord Oudoceus Kynith
        On Thu, 29 Nov 2001 06:20:17 -0800 (PST), SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        > Which has the easier & smoother pull? Longbow or
        > composite? Having a fairly short draw (30") I need the
        > most bang for the buck if I get into it THAT much
        > later on.
        >
        > Thx again
        >
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      • Jean Amann
        ... Regards, Roswitha
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 29, 2001
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          Ken Taylor wrote:

          >
          >
          > Another observation, I'd like to go with a #35 or less
          > because I can get 72 cheapo high school arrows (rated
          > for #35 or less) for $108. OR I can get 12? decent
          > arrows for $60 w/S&H. Which should I go with ... to
          > start out with. I figure, I'll do less walking back
          > and fourth initially when practicing with 72 target
          > arrows:)
          >
          > If they're right for your draw length, get the cheap arrows. You will
          > break them, lose them, and damage them at a rate you will find hard to
          > believe. When you find a group to shoot with, get someone to show you how
          > to check for and correct arrows that aren't quite straight, and to group
          > your arrows into lots that weigh roughly the same. That will greatly
          > improve your aim. When you've destroyed most of your 72 initial arrows,
          > then consider buying "decent" ones--but for $60/dozen, they would have to
          > be very good indeed. Ask around in the group, check archery shops, and
          > look at ads in archery magazines. You can find good arrows for less than
          > that.

          Regards,
          Roswitha

          >
          >
        • Walter Davis
          Ken, I know two easy ways to measure draw length. You can take a yardstick and place it against your chest. Extend your arms straight out with your palms and
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 29, 2001
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            Ken,

            I know two easy ways to measure draw length. You can take a yardstick and
            place it against your chest. Extend your arms straight out with your palms
            and fingertips together with the other end of the yardstick between them.
            The distance from your chest to the end your extended fingertips will be
            your draw length.

            The other way requires a bow and arrow. Clamp a clothes pin onto the arrow.
            Draw the bow to full draw allowing the bow to push the clothes pin towards
            the tip of the arrow. Where the clothes pin stops is your draw length.

            A composite bow is a bow made from different pieces (usually different
            materiels) glued or bound together. There are composite longbows as well as
            composite recurves. A selfbow is a bow made from one piece of wood.

            I still think you should get a good set of matched arrows, even when just
            starting out, whether you buy them or make them yourself. With cheap,
            unmatched arrows, arrow flight will be erratic. It will be hard to tell if
            your shooting is improving and it will be impossible to tune your bow for
            best performance. Get a bow first. Then get some help, from a dealer or a
            friend, matching your arrows to your bow. Even if you are shooting a $10
            fiberglass bow you should go with a set of matched arrows. A dozen arrows
            will last a long time if you start out shooting close to the target and
            gradually increase your range as your shooting improves. Shooting 72
            unmatched arrows will improve your stamina but I believe it will be
            detrimental to your shooting skill. A high quality of practice is worth
            more than a high quantity of practice. Shooting one shot a day with matched
            equipment and good form will serve you better than shooting 72 unmatched
            arrows with poor form.

            At your service,
            Oudoceus Kynith
            Shire of Rosenfeld
            Kingdom of Ansteorra

            On Thu, 29 Nov 2001 06:59:53 -0800 (PST), SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com wrote:

            >
            > SEE! I told you people I need help! lol. Im guessing I
            > am miscalculationg my drawlength. How does one do that
            > correctly? (if you can describe it)
            >
            > And I dont even know the difference between composite
            > and recurve, I admit to my ignorance :( My apologies.
            >
            >
            > Another observation, I'd like to go with a #35 or less
            > because I can get 72 cheapo high school arrows (rated
            > for #35 or less) for $108. OR I can get 12? decent
            > arrows for $60 w/S&H. Which should I go with ... to
            > start out with. I figure, I'll do less walking back
            > and fourth initially when practicing with 72 target
            > arrows:)
            >
            > Ragnar, I live in New London Cty.. more specifically
            > Fenbridge (sp?) if I remember correctly. Are you
            > around me?
            >
            >
            > PS - My "V" is not working on my keyboard.
            >
            >
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            >
            >
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            >
            >





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          • Brad Boda d'Aylward
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Another question ... matched ... I have to agree with this. The poundage really doesn t matter except for distance shooting. Our
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 7, 2001
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              Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Another question


              >Ken,
              >
              >>I still think you should get a good set of matched arrows, even when just
              >starting out, whether you buy them or make them yourself. With cheap,
              >unmatched arrows, arrow flight will be erratic. It will be hard to tell if
              >your shooting is improving and it will be impossible to tune your bow for
              >best performance. Get a bow first. Then get some help, from a dealer or a
              >friend, matching your arrows to your bow. Even if you are shooting a $10
              >fiberglass bow you should go with a set of matched arrows. A dozen arrows
              >will last a long time if you start out shooting close to the target and
              >gradually increase your range as your shooting improves. Shooting 72
              >unmatched arrows will improve your stamina but I believe it will be
              >detrimental to your shooting skill. A high quality of practice is worth
              >more than a high quantity of practice. Shooting one shot a day with
              matched
              >equipment and good form will serve you better than shooting 72 unmatched
              >arrows with poor form.
              >
              >At your service,
              >Oudoceus Kynith


              I have to agree with this. The poundage really doesn't matter except for
              distance shooting. Our typical ranges run out to fourty yards which is
              relatively close for archery targets.

              What truely affects your shooting is having a set of 'matched' arrows. This
              means a set which most of the arrows weigh close to the same weight, their
              'spine' or stiffness is close to the same from one to the next, and ( to
              really get picky) the grain all runs the same.

              Why?? The biggest concern is if you shoot an arrow and it hits the butt way
              to the left. You would compensate for that by adjusting your form and
              correct for the last shot - but the next arrow you draw has a serious bend
              in it and weighs more than the last arrow which flew left. This arrow might
              angle down to the right, whereupon you would have to re-adjust your form
              which sends the next (naturally, lighter) arrow clean over the target all
              together. Very frustrating and you never get to a place where your form
              feels 'right'. You could be shooting with perfect form and mismatched
              arrows will still fly erratically.

              Check with your local Minister of Arts and Sciences. Ours teaches classes on
              arrow making as a craft which was performed in the time period. Or, check
              with the local archery captain or marshal. They usually know someone who has
              the equipment and can show you how to assemble you own set. Bare arrow
              shafts aren't that expensive and you could make a set of matched arrows in a
              couple of evenings. We have fletching jigs (which hold the arrow and
              fletching in place while the glue dries) which we loan out. Glue a fletch
              during a commercial and then do the next one during the next commercial.

              Welcome to the insanity

              Brad
            • rishai money
              what i have been able to shoot with have been loaned to me so I cant say too much about it but the comment about 70 arrows wo good form is right ...
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 7, 2001
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                what i have been able to shoot with have been loaned
                to me so I cant say too much about it but the comment
                about 70 arrows wo good form is right
                --- Brad Boda d'Aylward <bradb@...> wrote:
                > Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Another question
                >
                >
                > >Ken,
                > >
                > >>I still think you should get a good set of matched
                > arrows, even when just
                > >starting out, whether you buy them or make them
                > yourself. With cheap,
                > >unmatched arrows, arrow flight will be erratic. It
                > will be hard to tell if
                > >your shooting is improving and it will be
                > impossible to tune your bow for
                > >best performance. Get a bow first. Then get some
                > help, from a dealer or a
                > >friend, matching your arrows to your bow. Even if
                > you are shooting a $10
                > >fiberglass bow you should go with a set of matched
                > arrows. A dozen arrows
                > >will last a long time if you start out shooting
                > close to the target and
                > >gradually increase your range as your shooting
                > improves. Shooting 72
                > >unmatched arrows will improve your stamina but I
                > believe it will be
                > >detrimental to your shooting skill. A high quality
                > of practice is worth
                > >more than a high quantity of practice. Shooting
                > one shot a day with
                > matched
                > >equipment and good form will serve you better than
                > shooting 72 unmatched
                > >arrows with poor form.
                > >
                > >At your service,
                > >Oudoceus Kynith
                >
                >
                > I have to agree with this. The poundage really
                > doesn't matter except for
                > distance shooting. Our typical ranges run out to
                > fourty yards which is
                > relatively close for archery targets.
                >
                > What truely affects your shooting is having a set of
                > 'matched' arrows. This
                > means a set which most of the arrows weigh close to
                > the same weight, their
                > 'spine' or stiffness is close to the same from one
                > to the next, and ( to
                > really get picky) the grain all runs the same.
                >
                > Why?? The biggest concern is if you shoot an arrow
                > and it hits the butt way
                > to the left. You would compensate for that by
                > adjusting your form and
                > correct for the last shot - but the next arrow you
                > draw has a serious bend
                > in it and weighs more than the last arrow which flew
                > left. This arrow might
                > angle down to the right, whereupon you would have to
                > re-adjust your form
                > which sends the next (naturally, lighter) arrow
                > clean over the target all
                > together. Very frustrating and you never get to a
                > place where your form
                > feels 'right'. You could be shooting with perfect
                > form and mismatched
                > arrows will still fly erratically.
                >
                > Check with your local Minister of Arts and Sciences.
                > Ours teaches classes on
                > arrow making as a craft which was performed in the
                > time period. Or, check
                > with the local archery captain or marshal. They
                > usually know someone who has
                > the equipment and can show you how to assemble you
                > own set. Bare arrow
                > shafts aren't that expensive and you could make a
                > set of matched arrows in a
                > couple of evenings. We have fletching jigs (which
                > hold the arrow and
                > fletching in place while the glue dries) which we
                > loan out. Glue a fletch
                > during a commercial and then do the next one during
                > the next commercial.
                >
                > Welcome to the insanity
                >
                > Brad
                >
                >
                > ---8<---------------------------------------------
                > Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2001 by Baron
                > Bows
                > Need a bow? Check http://www.baronbows.com/
                >
                > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to
                > leave this list]
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >


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