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Re: [SCA-Archery] Asymmetrical Bows

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  • Francois Leclerc
    ... The benefit at the time was the ability to have a powerful bow that was long, thus smoother, and that could be shot from horseback. The detriment would be
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 27 7:38 AM
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      > I was checking out the pics of the Hun bow and it's asymmetry. I am aware
      > that the Japanese bow is also asymmetrical.
      >
      > Is there a benefit to be asymmetrical? Detriment?

      The benefit at the time was the ability to have a powerful bow that was
      long, thus smoother, and that could be shot from horseback.

      The detriment would be (and I am speculating opn this one) that it's a
      different technique since the bow is held differently than a symetrical bow.
    • Mark Hendershott
      ... Held differently? How so? I just ordered a Hun, sort of sight unshot. I ve seen them at events but never shot one. Simon Sinnighe Briaroak,Summits, An
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 27 8:33 AM
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        At 10:38 AM 4/27/01 -0400, you wrote:
        >snip
        >
        >The detriment would be (and I am speculating opn this one) that it's a
        >different technique since the bow is held differently than a symetrical bow.

        Held differently? How so? I just ordered a Hun, sort of sight
        unshot. I've seen them at events but never shot one.

        Simon Sinnighe
        Briaroak,Summits, An Tir



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      • Scott Jaqua
        While I have yet to test my Hun while shooting from horse back, that is the intended purpose of an asymmetrical bow. As to needing to change how one shoots, I
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 27 2:13 PM
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          While I have yet to test my Hun while shooting from horse back, that is the
          intended purpose of an asymmetrical bow. As to needing to change how one
          shoots, I have not found it to be true. The only adaptation I had to make
          was, shooting off my hand (no rest or shelf). Of course one mistake I see a
          lot of people make with these bows, is to set the brace height too low. In
          general, most asymmetrical bows that I have seen , have a higher then normal
          (ie: recurve or longbow) brace height.

          True story:

          I received my Hun via mail on a Wednesday. That day I was able to shoot
          about three ends at twenty yards, in my back yard. Thursday I was able to
          shoot a couple of ends at 30 and one at 40 yards. Friday night I arrived
          on-site for Gyldenholts 20th anniversary event. Saturday I competed in the
          baronial archery championship, using my Hun. I had made a pledge to myself,
          a few weeks before to make my equipment more period in appearance. With the
          Hun it was very easy to keep this pledge. I was able to win the championship
          with a bow that I had only used twice before in practice.

          Since that day, my Hun has done well for me. Any problems have been with me
          and not the bow. I was even able to shoot and win two clout shoots, with it,
          my very first two times shooting that type of event.

          To say I am pleased with this bow would be an understatement. What I said
          after the very first time I shot it, is still true. They will not even be
          able to pry that bow out of my cold dead hands!

          Njall,
        • Becky H
          ... Hello Simon and Yahoo!Group. I have been lurking on this board for about 8 weeks, since I first started looking for info on the Hun I was about to buy.
          Message 4 of 11 , May 1, 2001
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            --- In SCA-Archery@y..., Mark Hendershott <crimlaw@j...> wrote:
            >
            > Held differently? How so? I just ordered a Hun, sort of sight
            > unshot. I've seen them at events but never shot one.
            >
            > Simon Sinnighe
            > Briaroak,Summits, An Tir
            >

            Hello Simon and Yahoo!Group. I have been lurking on this board for
            about 8 weeks, since I first started looking for info on the Hun I
            was about to buy. I've been shooting for 10 months and
            have found this to be a great community for newbie archers.

            I've had my Hun since the end of March, and I shoot it 3-4 times a
            week. I really love shooting it. From my experience it is not held
            differently than other bows. You hold it at the handle with the
            longer limb on top. I actually hold it at the top of the wood/handle
            area because that's where it feels best. Try moving your hand up and
            down in that area until if feels right. When you find the right spot,
            memorize it so you can be consistent every time.

            I have a question that maybe some of the more experienced archers can
            help me with. It's very distressing to me that the arrows are
            scratching the thread wrap above the handle. I'm going to make a
            leather cover for it, but from what I understand of arrows, they
            aren't supposed to hit the bow at all. I got arrows spined for the
            weight I'm pulling (30#) but they're really short (26") because,
            well, so are my arms. I've even started wearing a glove on my bow
            hand because the arrows were scratching me, even though I double
            glued the fletch down. How can I prevent the arrows from hitting the
            bow?

            Simon if you have any more Hun related questions, you can email me or
            post them here.

            --Becky
            becky@...
          • rstaggs@ece.arizona.edu
            Greetings, Due to arrow paradox, it is not possible to have the arrow not contact the bow. What I do to stop the arrows from scratching the handle/shelf area
            Message 5 of 11 , May 2, 2001
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              Greetings,
              Due to arrow paradox, it is not possible to have the arrow not
              contact
              the bow. What I do to stop the arrows from scratching the
              handle/shelf area is to use a small piece of mole skin or calf
              hair(purchsed as arrow shelf kit from BEAR)and wrap it aroun the bow
              at the contact spot. As you seem to be using your bow hand as your
              arrow rest, it is a good idea to protect that hand with a glove(
              unless you have a massive callus on that first knuckle LOL) These
              seem
              to work for me. Hope it helps.

              Yours in service;

              Ldy. Germaine Sylvrbyrd of Staghurst
              Kindom of Atenveldt
              Barony of Tir Ysgithr
            • archer3@webtv.net
              When drawing on the hand it is a given that the arrow is in contact with the bow. The roll of the string with either the mediterranean or eastern purposely
              Message 6 of 11 , May 2, 2001
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                When drawing on the hand it is a given that the arrow is in contact
                with the bow. The "roll" of the string with either the mediterranean or
                eastern purposely pulls the arrow in to contact. If you pull the arrow
                away from the bow, you are pinching the string.
                For a strike plate I glue on a thin piece of the hardest and smoothest
                leather I have. I don't recommend using epoxy. If you are hearing a
                "click" from the arrow on release you are plucking. :-)

                Damian >>~~~>
              • greytaylor@worldnet.att.net
                Wrapping the fore of the feather with thread can help ease the transition as the arrow passes over your hand. I know a number of non-SCA primitive bow
                Message 7 of 11 , May 2, 2001
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                  Wrapping the fore of the feather with thread can help ease the
                  transition as the arrow passes over your hand. I know a number of
                  non-SCA primitive bow shooters that shoot off their hands rather than
                  use an arrow rest. All of them wrap the leading edge of their
                  feathers with thread. I've been playing with making bamboo arrows in
                  an oriental style and all of them are getting wrapped with silk
                  thread because they'll be shot off the hand (looks pretty cool,
                  too). In fact, I need to meet with Njall to get him to shoot a
                  couple of these on his Hun bow as the arrow style and long length
                  should fit the two of them well.

                  Taillear


                  --- In SCA-Archery@y..., "Becky H" <blue_becky@h...> wrote:
                  snippage
                  > I have a question that maybe some of the more experienced archers
                  can
                  > help me with. It's very distressing to me that the arrows are
                  > scratching the thread wrap above the handle. I'm going to make a
                  > leather cover for it, but from what I understand of arrows, they
                  > aren't supposed to hit the bow at all. I got arrows spined for the
                  > weight I'm pulling (30#) but they're really short (26") because,
                  > well, so are my arms. I've even started wearing a glove on my bow
                  > hand because the arrows were scratching me, even though I double
                  > glued the fletch down. How can I prevent the arrows from hitting
                  the
                  > bow?
                  >
                  > Simon if you have any more Hun related questions, you can email me
                  or
                  > post them here.
                  >
                  > --Becky
                  > becky@p...
                • jotl@ridgecrest.ca.us
                  ... I wrap both the base and the knock end of the fletch with silk thread further held down with flycaster s ring varnish. I still got fletch cuts on my
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 2, 2001
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                    At 1:03 AM 5/3/01 +0000, greytaylor@... wrote:
                    >Wrapping the fore of the feather with thread can help ease the
                    >transition as the arrow passes over your hand. I know a number of
                    >non-SCA primitive bow shooters that shoot off their hands rather than
                    >use an arrow rest. All of them wrap the leading edge of their
                    >feathers with thread. I've been playing with making bamboo arrows in
                    >an oriental style and all of them are getting wrapped with silk
                    >thread because they'll be shot off the hand (looks pretty cool,
                    >too). In fact, I need to meet with Njall to get him to shoot a
                    >couple of these on his Hun bow as the arrow style and long length
                    >should fit the two of them well.
                    >
                    >Taillear

                    I wrap both the base and the knock end of the fletch with silk thread
                    further held down with flycaster's ring varnish. I still got fletch cuts
                    on my unprotected hand while shooting them with my ELB. Full gloves are
                    too hot here in the desert, so I went to a leather ring as a rest on the
                    index finger of my bow hand. Seems to work pretty well and and I don't get
                    nearly as sweaty as with a glove. I have a flat on the side of the ring to
                    hold against the bow handle and a flat on top to serve as an arrow rest; I
                    index the ring on the top of the stiching of the leather grip covering on
                    the bow. I was told that impressions of such archer's rings were found in
                    the mud at the Mary Rose find, but I have not researched this myself.

                    Another thing people have done is to cut away a leather glove leaving only
                    the index finger covered to serve as the rest. Others have sewn a simple
                    leather cover to place over the finger at risk to form an arrow shelf.

                    James
                    jotl@...
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