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shaft sleeve query

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  • richard johnson
    When i went to a gun show I saw some hand-made arrows that looked nice.. but revealed that the fletching was straight. no curve! no offset. I have a
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 8, 2013
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      When i went to a gun show I saw some hand-made arrows that looked
      nice.. but revealed that the fletching was straight. no curve! no
      offset.

      I have a 'primitive' fletcher jig that will hold the feathers at 120
      degree apart but setting the offset is guesswork so I use an old jig
      from the 70's to ensure that the arrows are set and offset properly.

      This caused me to wonder how our ancestors managed to get a consistant
      offset on their arrows?
      Even Otzi had a 105 degree offset on his arrows.

      Thus I am trying to 'invent' a sleeve-guide that I can use to ensure a
      proper placing of the feathers without using my modern fletch-jig.

      How was it done?
      Anyone know?


      --
      Rick Johnson
      http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
      "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
      security will soon find that they have neither."
    • Carl Nelson
      experience and training from one fletcher to the next down through history, Master to Apprentice. ... -- Carl Nelson archcoach@gmail.com 626-297-6513
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 8, 2013
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        experience and training from one fletcher to the next down through history, Master to Apprentice.


        On Tue, Oct 8, 2013 at 2:55 PM, richard johnson <rikjohnson39@...> wrote:
         

        When i went to a gun show I saw some hand-made arrows that looked
        nice.. but revealed that the fletching was straight. no curve! no
        offset.

        I have a 'primitive' fletcher jig that will hold the feathers at 120
        degree apart but setting the offset is guesswork so I use an old jig
        from the 70's to ensure that the arrows are set and offset properly.

        This caused me to wonder how our ancestors managed to get a consistant
        offset on their arrows?
        Even Otzi had a 105 degree offset on his arrows.

        Thus I am trying to 'invent' a sleeve-guide that I can use to ensure a
        proper placing of the feathers without using my modern fletch-jig.

        How was it done?
        Anyone know?

        --
        Rick Johnson
        http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
        "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
        security will soon find that they have neither."




        --
        Carl Nelson
        626-297-6513
      • Guy Taylor
        Just so you know, feathers do not have to be offset or have helical when they are glued. The arrow will still spin if the feathers are glued on straight.
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 8, 2013
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          Just so you know, feathers do not have to be offset or have helical
          when they are glued. The arrow will still spin if the feathers are
          glued on straight.
          Offset or helical can be desired when using a broadhead that may want
          to plane in the air, but target arrows will do fine with straight
          fletching.

          Taillear

          On 10/8/13, richard johnson <rikjohnson39@...> wrote:
          > When i went to a gun show I saw some hand-made arrows that looked
          > nice.. but revealed that the fletching was straight. no curve! no
          > offset.
          >
          > I have a 'primitive' fletcher jig that will hold the feathers at 120
          > degree apart but setting the offset is guesswork so I use an old jig
          > from the 70's to ensure that the arrows are set and offset properly.
          >
          > This caused me to wonder how our ancestors managed to get a consistant
          > offset on their arrows?
          > Even Otzi had a 105 degree offset on his arrows.
          >
          > Thus I am trying to 'invent' a sleeve-guide that I can use to ensure a
          > proper placing of the feathers without using my modern fletch-jig.
          >
          > How was it done?
          > Anyone know?
          >
          >
          > --
          > Rick Johnson
          > http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
          > "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
          > security will soon find that they have neither."
          >


          --
          The Greenman Archery <http://www.greenmanarchery.com/index.html> Website
          Fine custom wood arrows for traditional archers.
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