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Re: [SCA-Archery] Strings Part II

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  • Carolus
    I ve had a flemish twist string I made fail once. Hyper critical 9 strand Kevlar on a 44# Hoyt shooting Easton X7 aluminum shafts. String was in excess of
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
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      I've had a flemish twist string I made fail once.  Hyper critical 9 strand Kevlar on a 44# Hoyt shooting Easton X7 aluminum shafts.  String was in excess of 5000 shots and I just didn't pay attention to the warning signs.  Pay attention, take your time making it and your DIY string won't fail any faster than a commercial one (I've had 3 commercial Dacron stings fail).
      Carolus
      On 6/26/2013 8:20 AM, richard johnson wrote:
       

      With 12-16 or more strands, my initial thoughts would be that you'd
      see the individual strands fray long before the thing snapped, but i
      was curious as to if anyone actually HAD a home-made string snap.

      On 6/26/13, Guy Taylor <greenmanarrows@...> wrote:
      > Unless you push the envelope, don't pay attention to maintenance, or
      > do something similarly boneheaded, there is no reason to have a string
      > failure.
      > I've never had a string fail on any of my bows and I've never heard of
      > one I made for someone else failing.
      >
      > Taillear
      >
      > On 6/26/13, richard johnson <rikjohnson39@...> wrote:
      >> Now, being a bit of a paranoid person who overengineers my work,
      >> I've never had a professional string break. Had a number of bows
      >> break on me but string failure is a worry of mine.
      >> Thus I prefer to buy them from someone who knows what they are doing
      >> for fear that what I make may fail.
      >>
      >> Still, reading the literature and watching the vids and the fact that
      >> I just purchased a 45# take-down bow with wood riser (the previous
      >> owner hated the feel of the grip but, I am a decent woodworker so some
      >> work with a file and sandpaper made it feel right) and no string makes
      >> me want to try string-making. Making a serving jig, a string board
      >> and such are well within my skills. Hey! I make tables and other such
      >> projects for fun.
      >>
      >> For those who DO make bowstrings, how often do your strings fail?
      >> And what would you say was the cause?
      >>
      >> --
      >> Rick Johnson
      >> http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
      >> "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
      >> security will soon find that they have neither."
      >>
      >
      >
      > --
      > The Greenman Archery <http://www.greenmanarchery.com/index.html> Website
      > Fine custom wood arrows for traditional archers.
      >

      --
      Rick Johnson
      http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
      "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined
      security will soon find that they have neither."


    • Fritz
      When richard johnson put fingers to keys it was 6/26/13 10:43 AM... ... I ve had linen strings fail. They wore at the nock point and I hadn t yet learned the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 3, 2013
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        When richard johnson put fingers to keys it was 6/26/13 10:43 AM...

        > ...
        > For those who DO make bowstrings, how often do your strings fail?
        > And what would you say was the cause?

        I've had linen strings fail.
        They wore at the nock point and I hadn't yet learned the signs*.

        The strings always broke as the arrow left the bow, it was never
        traumatic, just disappointing.

        I make twined "Flemish" strings. I go 4x bow strength in the body, and
        add in half again the threads at the ends for the loop and the bowyer's
        knot, and as much as is necessary to fit the arrows in the nocking area.
        I found that serving that area hides the signs of impending failure.



        *
        On a linen or hemp and beeswax string: When the spot where the arrow
        rests starts looking like polished black walnut, it's time to replace.
        This was learned on a 70+# Osage Orange Longbow. YMMV.
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