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Helical vs straight fletching

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  • tomjulessca
    In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, I think you have better control with the straight
    Message 1 of 8 , May 7, 2013
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      In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, "I think you have better control with the straight because you can adjust the angle more precisely. I think I can even get better spin with it."

      For myself, I am inclined to go with straight because it is period. However, I will also be making arrows for my wife who has only held a bow twice. If helical aids accuracy, I would like to give her that advantage. Anyone have an opinion? Particularly, if there is an advantage, is it slight, moderate, or what? Thanks.

      Tom
    • Siegfried
      I m not sure if the statement helical isn t period is actually correct. Given that the nature of many types of feathers already have a curve to them, and
      Message 2 of 8 , May 7, 2013
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        I'm not sure if the statement "helical isn't period" is actually correct.

        Given that the nature of many types of feathers already have a curve to
        them, and given that I've seen some references/pictures of extant
        fletching (or evidence of such) that would imply helical.

        Such as crossbow bolts, with fletching grooves cut in an angled/helical
        manner.

        In fact, Rodger Asham in his 1545 book Toxophilus on archery describes
        how an arrow should be fletched so it spirals in flight ... This implies
        that archers in the 16th century (or at least Rodger), understood
        helical fletching techniques.

        Siegfried


        On 5/8/13 12:21 AM, tomjulessca wrote:
        > In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, "I think you have better control with the straight because you can adjust the angle more precisely. I think I can even get better spin with it."
        >
        > For myself, I am inclined to go with straight because it is period. However, I will also be making arrows for my wife who has only held a bow twice. If helical aids accuracy, I would like to give her that advantage. Anyone have an opinion? Particularly, if there is an advantage, is it slight, moderate, or what? Thanks.
        >
        > Tom
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >

        --
        Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust, OP - Baron Highland Foorde - Atlantia
        http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
      • lekervere
        This link explores the question with some reasonably good methods http://archeryreport.com/2011/07/helical-straight-fletch-accuracy-repeatability/ I d prefer a
        Message 3 of 8 , May 7, 2013
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          This link explores the question with some reasonably good methods
          http://archeryreport.com/2011/07/helical-straight-fletch-accuracy-repeatability/
          I'd prefer a larger number of shots before drawing conclusions. Notice that all the shots are on the paper, but the helical fletching shows a slightly tighter group. Both have some shots in the outer zone.
          For beginning archers, helical fletching will not help to put you on the paper. Practice will. I think only expert archers are likely to get a noticeable benefit from the helical fletching. There are so many things that can keep a shot off the mark, mostly matters of form. Making the arrow spin will not help with any of them.

          Edward le Kervere

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "tomjulessca" <tomjulessca@...> wrote:
          >
          > In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, "I think you have better control with the straight because you can adjust the angle more precisely. I think I can even get better spin with it."
          >
          > For myself, I am inclined to go with straight because it is period. However, I will also be making arrows for my wife who has only held a bow twice. If helical aids accuracy, I would like to give her that advantage. Anyone have an opinion? Particularly, if there is an advantage, is it slight, moderate, or what? Thanks.
          >
          > Tom
          >
        • Carolus
          Entirely correct. The details of adjusting fletching angle, feather shape & size, straight vs. helical are seriously advanced topics to be addressed only
          Message 4 of 8 , May 8, 2013
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            Entirely correct.  The details of adjusting fletching angle, feather shape & size, straight vs. helical are seriously advanced topics to be addressed only after basic tuning and form have been stabilized.  Worry about matching arrow weight and balance to your bow and shooting style first.  Have your wife check eye dominance, get a stable and comfortable stance, learn proper draw and follow through and develop her muscle memory before worrying about this.  She's got a couple thousand shots to go through before fletching will make a difference.  If everything else is right the arrows don't need fletching.
            Carolus
            On 5/7/2013 9:54 PM, lekervere wrote:
             

            This link explores the question with some reasonably good methods
            http://archeryreport.com/2011/07/helical-straight-fletch-accuracy-repeatability/
            I'd prefer a larger number of shots before drawing conclusions. Notice that all the shots are on the paper, but the helical fletching shows a slightly tighter group. Both have some shots in the outer zone.
            For beginning archers, helical fletching will not help to put you on the paper. Practice will. I think only expert archers are likely to get a noticeable benefit from the helical fletching. There are so many things that can keep a shot off the mark, mostly matters of form. Making the arrow spin will not help with any of them.

            Edward le Kervere

            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "tomjulessca" <tomjulessca@...> wrote:
            >
            > In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, "I think you have better control with the straight because you can adjust the angle more precisely. I think I can even get better spin with it."
            >
            > For myself, I am inclined to go with straight because it is period. However, I will also be making arrows for my wife who has only held a bow twice. If helical aids accuracy, I would like to give her that advantage. Anyone have an opinion? Particularly, if there is an advantage, is it slight, moderate, or what? Thanks.
            >
            > Tom
            >


          • tomjulessca
            Excellent article and great advice - thanks Edward!
            Message 5 of 8 , May 8, 2013
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              Excellent article and great advice - thanks Edward!


              --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "lekervere" <edwoodguy@...> wrote:
              >
              > This link explores the question with some reasonably good methods
              > http://archeryreport.com/2011/07/helical-straight-fletch-accuracy-repeatability/
              > I'd prefer a larger number of shots before drawing conclusions. Notice that all the shots are on the paper, but the helical fletching shows a slightly tighter group. Both have some shots in the outer zone.
              > For beginning archers, helical fletching will not help to put you on the paper. Practice will. I think only expert archers are likely to get a noticeable benefit from the helical fletching. There are so many things that can keep a shot off the mark, mostly matters of form. Making the arrow spin will not help with any of them.
              >
              > Edward le Kervere
              >
              > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "tomjulessca" <tomjulessca@> wrote:
              > >
              > > In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, "I think you have better control with the straight because you can adjust the angle more precisely. I think I can even get better spin with it."
              > >
              > > For myself, I am inclined to go with straight because it is period. However, I will also be making arrows for my wife who has only held a bow twice. If helical aids accuracy, I would like to give her that advantage. Anyone have an opinion? Particularly, if there is an advantage, is it slight, moderate, or what? Thanks.
              > >
              > > Tom
              > >
              >
            • i_griffen
              Yes, agree it was an interesting article. But, This testing was don using Compound bows and Carbon arrows with a release. So if this same testing was done
              Message 6 of 8 , May 9, 2013
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                Yes, agree it was an interesting article. But, This testing was don using Compound bows and Carbon arrows with a release. So if this same testing was done using Traditional Bows, wooden arrows, with fingers. The results would be closer t the way we shoot.


                IG


                --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "tomjulessca" <tomjulessca@...> wrote:
                >
                > Excellent article and great advice - thanks Edward!
                >
                >
                > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "lekervere" <edwoodguy@> wrote:
                > >
                > > This link explores the question with some reasonably good methods
                > > http://archeryreport.com/2011/07/helical-straight-fletch-accuracy-repeatability/
                > > I'd prefer a larger number of shots before drawing conclusions. Notice that all the shots are on the paper, but the helical fletching shows a slightly tighter group. Both have some shots in the outer zone.
                > > For beginning archers, helical fletching will not help to put you on the paper. Practice will. I think only expert archers are likely to get a noticeable benefit from the helical fletching. There are so many things that can keep a shot off the mark, mostly matters of form. Making the arrow spin will not help with any of them.
                > >
                > > Edward le Kervere
                > >
                > > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "tomjulessca" <tomjulessca@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, "I think you have better control with the straight because you can adjust the angle more precisely. I think I can even get better spin with it."
                > > >
                > > > For myself, I am inclined to go with straight because it is period. However, I will also be making arrows for my wife who has only held a bow twice. If helical aids accuracy, I would like to give her that advantage. Anyone have an opinion? Particularly, if there is an advantage, is it slight, moderate, or what? Thanks.
                > > >
                > > > Tom
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • lekervere
                In this case the use of a compound bow with a mechanical release serves to make the test more consistent, and therefore more relevant. The only way to make it
                Message 7 of 8 , May 9, 2013
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                  In this case the use of a compound bow with a mechanical release serves to make the test more consistent, and therefore more relevant. The only way to make it more consistent would be to use a mechanical shooting machine that completely eliminated the human shooter. The test shows that if all other things are reasonably consistent, the spiral fletching does contribute to a somewhat tighter grouping. I still think there are very few of us with form so consistent that this would make a difference in our scores.

                  Edward le Kervere

                  --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "i_griffen" <i_griffen@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Yes, agree it was an interesting article. But, This testing was don using Compound bows and Carbon arrows with a release. So if this same testing was done using Traditional Bows, wooden arrows, with fingers. The results would be closer t the way we shoot.
                  >
                  >
                  > IG
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "tomjulessca" <tomjulessca@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Excellent article and great advice - thanks Edward!
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "lekervere" <edwoodguy@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > This link explores the question with some reasonably good methods
                  > > > http://archeryreport.com/2011/07/helical-straight-fletch-accuracy-repeatability/
                  > > > I'd prefer a larger number of shots before drawing conclusions. Notice that all the shots are on the paper, but the helical fletching shows a slightly tighter group. Both have some shots in the outer zone.
                  > > > For beginning archers, helical fletching will not help to put you on the paper. Practice will. I think only expert archers are likely to get a noticeable benefit from the helical fletching. There are so many things that can keep a shot off the mark, mostly matters of form. Making the arrow spin will not help with any of them.
                  > > >
                  > > > Edward le Kervere
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "tomjulessca" <tomjulessca@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > In response to my question about buying a fletching jig, and merits of helical vs straight, Carolus said, "I think you have better control with the straight because you can adjust the angle more precisely. I think I can even get better spin with it."
                  > > > >
                  > > > > For myself, I am inclined to go with straight because it is period. However, I will also be making arrows for my wife who has only held a bow twice. If helical aids accuracy, I would like to give her that advantage. Anyone have an opinion? Particularly, if there is an advantage, is it slight, moderate, or what? Thanks.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Tom
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • The Greys
                  My personal experience tends to agree with Edward here. I ve been making my own arrows for some time. I ve tried straight, diagonal and helicoil fletching.
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 10, 2013
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                    My personal experience tends to agree with Edward here. I've been making my own arrows for some time. I've tried straight, diagonal and helicoil fletching. I've gone so far was to weigh each finished arrow and code them to within 25 grain weights. The thought process was, if I make 18 - 24 arrows in one batch but only need 6 for a Royal Round use the 6 that are closest in weight. I've even done the "mark each shaft, aim at same point, record where shaft actually hits", then use the most consistent of the batch process. After all of this I have concluded that while having good arrows does count, improved technique and lots of practice goes much farther. There is also the basic fact that ALL arrows turn in flight. Straight fletched the least, helicoil the most.

                    cog

                    --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "lekervere" <edwoodguy@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > In this case the use of a compound bow with a mechanical release serves to make the test more consistent, and therefore more relevant. The only way to make it more consistent would be to use a mechanical shooting machine that completely eliminated the human shooter. The test shows that if all other things are reasonably consistent, the spiral fletching does contribute to a somewhat tighter grouping. I still think there are very few of us with form so consistent that this would make a difference in our scores.
                    >
                    > Edward le Kervere
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