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Re: [SCA-Archery] shooting off on a tangent

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  • Taslen
    Edward, What do you think of the spruce shafts? I have thought about switching to them myself Gaelen O Gradaigh ________________________________ From:
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 4, 2013
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      Edward,

      What do you think of the spruce shafts? I have thought about switching to them myself

      Gaelen O'Gradaigh


      From: lekervere <edwoodguy@...>
      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, March 4, 2013 3:18 AM
      Subject: [SCA-Archery] shooting off on a tangent

       

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "JDS" wrote:
      > Unless a bow Hunter/Competitor * I *
      > see little need /use
      > for over say 45# (no extra points for macho)

      I agree. I have a 50# bow, but I couldn't use it for tournaments because my arm would be jelly halfway through. I use a 40# and I can shoot all day.
      An important point though, it helps to use the lightest arrows that will still shoot straight off your bow. I see a lot of SCA archers using heavy field arrows in light bows, and they fly like bricks. A lighter arrow shoots flatter, and its easier to get the elevation right.
      One rule of thumb is 10 grains per pound of draw weight. That's a 400 grain arrow for a 40# bow. That's not the easiest thing to construct. I'm having very good results with sitka spruce, tapered on both ends to reduce weight. Switching to these lighter arrows, I added 40 points to my field round scores.

      Edward le Kervere



    • lekervere
      I think the spruce shafts are great. Everyone is surprised at how light they feel in the hand, but they re tougher than they feel. They re at least as strong
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 5, 2013
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        I think the spruce shafts are great. Everyone is surprised at how light they feel in the hand, but they're tougher than they feel. They're at least as strong as cedar shafts, and probably a little stronger when they hit hard objects. They come straight and they stay straight.
        When I ordered them I asked for 5/16" 40#. They were out of stock on those but Mr. Hildebrand offered to double taper the thicker shafts for free. My 29 1/2" shafts weigh about 300 grains bare. They're creamy white, so I chose to use stain, not paint. I think it kept them lighter. Leather dye works well, followed by a light coat of spray acrylic. The wood grain under a transparent finish makes for a nice lustre. You have to look hard to find the growth rings when gluing up nocks, but the rings are in there.
        The real advantage of spruce shafts is the weight. They're really light, so they shoot fast and the path is flatter. It makes it much easier to hit the farther targets.

        Edward

        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Taslen <taslen2000@...> wrote:
        >
        > Edward,
        >
        > What do you think of the spruce shafts? I have thought about switching to them myself
        >
        > Gaelen O'Gradaigh
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: lekervere <edwoodguy@...>
        > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, March 4, 2013 3:18 AM
        > Subject: [SCA-Archery] shooting off on a tangent
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "JDS" wrote:
        > > Unless a bow Hunter/Competitor * I *
        > > see little need /use
        > > for over say 45# (no extra points for macho)
        >
        > I agree. I have a 50# bow, but I couldn't use it for tournaments because my arm would be jelly halfway through. I use a 40# and I can shoot all day.
        > An important point though, it helps to use the lightest arrows that will still shoot straight off your bow. I see a lot of SCA archers using heavy field arrows in light bows, and they fly like bricks. A lighter arrow shoots flatter, and its easier to get the elevation right.
        > One rule of thumb is 10 grains per pound of draw weight. That's a 400 grain arrow for a 40# bow. That's not the easiest thing to construct. I'm having very good results with sitka spruce, tapered on both ends to reduce weight. Switching to these lighter arrows, I added 40 points to my field round scores.
        >
        > Edward le Kervere
        >
      • Steven Casort
        Check your eye dominance, ie which eye is the one your brain tends to use most.   I have been using the spruce shafts for about a year and find very little
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 5, 2013
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          Check your eye dominance, ie which eye is the one your brain tends to use most.
           
          I have been using the spruce shafts for about a year and find very little difference from POC.

          In Service
          Ihon MacLucas
          aka Steve Casort
        • Caterina Fortuna
          Ditto. Now, spruce arrows work great off a lighter draw weight bow. And fantastic for distance shooting. But, if your bow is tuned faster and you shoot a lot
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 6, 2013
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            Ditto. Now, spruce arrows work great off a lighter draw weight bow. And fantastic for distance shooting. But, if your bow is tuned faster and you shoot a lot it IS possible to shoot the spine out. I.e. shooting 1-3 hours 5 times a week for a month and a half dropped the spine weight about 10-15# on all of my spruce arrows.

            All of our previous dozens of shafts have done this.

            Currently, i have approx 7 high altitude cedar shafts for practice and scoring and a fresh dozen of spruce for scoring, specific tourneys, and distance shooting.

            My favorite is purple leather dye on the wood shafts with true oil on top.
            Cat

            On Mar 5, 2013 10:16 AM, "lekervere" <edwoodguy@...> wrote:
            >
            >  
            >
            They're at least as strong as cedar shafts, and probably a little stronger when they hit hard objects. They come straight and they stay straight.
            They're creamy white, so I chose to use stain, not paint. I think it kept them lighter. Leather dye works well, followed by a light coat of spray acrylic. The wood grain under a transparent finish makes for a nice lustre.

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