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RE: [SCA-Archery] Junior Royal Rounds?

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  • Bill Moore
    Here in AEthelmearc we have Junior RR s. They are exactly the same as a regular RR except they are shot at 10, 15 and 20 instead of 20,30 and 40. They also
    Message 1 of 34 , Jan 11, 2013
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      Here in AEthelmearc we have Junior RR’s. They are exactly the same as a regular RR except they are shot at 10, 15 and 20 instead of 20,30 and 40. They also include the speed round. The scoring for the badges is the same also. Anyone under 18 is allowed, although if able, they are incouraged to shoot adult rounds.

       

      Baron Edward Harbinger

      AEthelmearc Region 5 Archery Marshal

       

      From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of goldenhind04
      Sent: Friday, January 11, 2013 3:07 PM
      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SCA-Archery] Junior Royal Rounds?

       

       

      I'm working on a new Society wide youth archery merit badge (a new thing in the works). Does everyone have a Junior Royal Round, at least on the books? The one in Caid calls for 8 arrows at 20, 15, and 10 yards, no speed end. Rankings for Juniors (14 and under, max draw weight 35#) are the same as for adults, but using the scores from Jr. RRs, so Bowman 25-44 points, Yeoman 45-65 points, etc.

      How about everyone else? I would hate to asssume that's the way everyone does it for badge purposes and find out differently later. I'd *really* appreciate it if folks from different areas would look this up in their kingdom handbooks and post.

    • lekervere
      ... The short answer is: novelty shoots. Shooting at paper for score is engaging for some, but others who do not often hit the center can grow tired of it
      Message 34 of 34 , Jan 14, 2013
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        > At any age group, how do you supply encouragement to newer archers?
        The short answer is: novelty shoots.
        Shooting at paper for score is engaging for some, but others who do not often hit the center can grow tired of it fairly soon.
        I run a popinjay prize shoot for young archers a couple times a year. There is no counting for score. If you shoot the bird off the perch, you win the prize. This can keep children age 5 to 15 engaged for 90 minutes or more, even with delays for shooting in three groups because the line is crowded. The small target helps develop instinctive aim, and the shooters are encouraged as they get closer and closer to the bird. Their next shot could win a prize.
        Similar psychology holds for adult shooters. If the target is fun to shoot at, they are less discouraged by misses, and the next shot could be a hit.
        You can't do novelties at every shoot, but if the point of the event is to orient new archers and bring them into the sport, novelties may be the way to go.
        An interesting psychology experiment: for archers that are shooting all around the rim of the target, place a balloon over the bull's eye and see if their scores improve.

        Edward le Kervere
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