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Possible SSAC competition

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  • John Edgerton
    To see the photo and drawing of the target, see the files section of this group for the competition. Jon ********* SSAC The Triangle or Fitz-Rauf Target
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 19, 2012
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      To see the photo and drawing of the target, see the files section of this group for the competition. 


      Jon

      *********


      SSAC

      The Triangle or Fitz-Rauf Target

       

      Archers are used to targets where the highest point value is in the center of the target; a concentric circle, the peg in a roundel target, etc. So if your aim is a bit off you still can get the next highest point value. 

       

      With the Triangle Target which is an equilateral triangle, with one of its points straight up, divided into three equal width horizontal bands, the highest point value is the top part of the triangle. So, if you are aiming for the highest value and your aim is a bit high, left or right, you can miss completely and receive no points. Those that try for the highest value have a greater chance of making no score if they miss, than those that aim for the lower value areas. This provides a high scoring area for the better archers and still has a larger lower scoring area for the average archers.

       

      The three parts of the triangle target from Medieval Japan were said to represent a warrior on horseback. The top, high scoring, triangle was his head. The middle band was his body. And the largest band, the bottom, was his horse.

       

      The area of the highest scoring part, the head, is one-fifth the area of the horse and one-third the area of his body. So a logical way of scoring is: Head is five points. Body is three points. The horse is one point.

       

      My addition to this target is to make it a bit more challenging for the highly skilled archers by drawing one additional horizontal line at the upper third of the top or head triangle. This would represent a visor slot and would be a forty-fifth the area of the horse. However, this would give a point value of forty-five which would be too high, because one lucky shot to it and five misses of the target would give more points than hitting the head with all six. A reasonable compromise would be to give a value of fifteen points. However, slight errors in aim are even more apt to create a complete miss and zero points.

       

      For the SSAC competition, the triangle has 20 inch long sides. And is shot from 20 yards. There is no time limit. It is shot in four ends of three arrows for a total of twelve arrows and a possible maximum score of 180 points. The youth division is shot from 15 yards.  The standard SSAC rules apply.

       

      Bottom-black = 1 point

      Middle-red      = 3 points

      Top-gold         = 5 points

      Visor-black     = 15 points

       

      Lines count as higher score.

       

       

      AppleMark

      The gold triangle in this photo shows up as white and the black visor, is just noticeable at the upper tip. It is a 27 inch triangle on a 36” matt. The target was first shot at West/An Tir War, 2012.

       

       

       

      The below drawing shows the scoring areas and values of the target.

      AppleMark

    • Jim Pickette
      Jon, Please expand the achronym SSAC . Thanks. JoO Calontir
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 19, 2012
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        Jon,

        Please expand the achronym "SSAC".

        Thanks.

        JoO
        Calontir

        ---- John Edgerton <sirjon1@...> wrote:
        > To see the photo and drawing of the target, see the files section of this group
        > for the competition.
        >
        > Jon
        > *********
        >
        > SSAC
        > The Triangle or Fitz-Rauf Target
        >
        > Archers are used to targets where the highest point value is in the center of
        > the target; a concentric circle, the peg in a roundel target, etc. So if your
        > aim is a bit off you still can get the next highest point value.
        >
        >
        > With the Triangle Target which is an equilateral triangle, with one of its
        > points straight up, divided into three equal width horizontal bands, the highest
        > point value is the top part of the triangle. So, if you are aiming for the
        > highest value and your aim is a bit high, left or right, you can miss completely
        > and receive no points. Those that try for the highest value have a greater
        > chance of making no score if they miss, than those that aim for the lower value
        > areas. This provides a high scoring area for the better archers and still has a
        > larger lower scoring area for the average archers.
        >
        >
        > The three parts of the triangle target from Medieval Japan were said to
        > represent a warrior on horseback. The top, high scoring, triangle was his head.
        > The middle band was his body. And the largest band, the bottom, was his horse.
        >
        >
        > The area of the highest scoring part, the head, is one-fifth the area of the
        > horse and one-third the area of his body. So a logical way of scoring is: Head
        > is five points. Body is three points. The horse is one point.
        >
        >
        > My addition to this target is to make it a bit more challenging for the highly
        > skilled archers by drawing one additional horizontal line at the upper third of
        > the top or head triangle. This would represent a visor slot and would be a
        > forty-fifth the area of the horse. However, this would give a point value of
        > forty-five which would be too high, because one lucky shot to it and five misses
        > of the target would give more points than hitting the head with all six. A
        > reasonable compromise would be to give a value of fifteen points. However,
        > slight errors in aim are even more apt to create a complete miss and zero
        > points.
        >
        >
        > For the SSAC competition, the triangle has 20 inch long sides. And is shot from
        > 20 yards. There is no time limit. It is shot in four ends of three arrows for a
        > total of twelve arrows and a possible maximum score of 180 points. The youth
        > division is shot from 15 yards. The standard SSAC rules apply.
        >
        >
        > Bottom-black = 1 point
        > Middle-red = 3 points
        > Top-gold = 5 points
        > Visor-black = 15 points
        >
        > Lines count as higher score.
        >
        >
        > The gold triangle in this photo shows up as white and the black visor, is just
        > noticeable at the upper tip. It is a 27 inch triangle on a 36” matt. The target
        > was first shot at West/An Tir War, 2012.
        >
        >
        >
        > The below drawing shows the scoring areas and values of the target.
      • John Edgerton
        You can also go to the SCA Scores for further information on the competition. http://scores-sca.org/home/index.php?R=25 Jon ________________________________
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 19, 2012
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          You can also go to the SCA Scores for further information on the competition. 


          Jon


          From: Jim Pickette <pickette@...>
          To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: John Edgerton <sirjon1@...>
          Sent: Wed, September 19, 2012 5:35:31 PM
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Possible SSAC competition

           

          Jon,

          Please expand the achronym "SSAC".

          Thanks.

          JoO
          Calontir

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