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Arrow shafts in the Viking era

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  • lekervere
    Since we re on this subject anyway, I have a question: A lot of the arrowheads found in viking era graves are leaf shaped with a long thin tang for mounting to
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 14, 2012
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      Since we're on this subject anyway, I have a question:
      A lot of the arrowheads found in viking era graves are leaf shaped with a long thin tang for mounting to the shaft. Similar tang designs are seen through Asia, and are intended to be mounted on bamboo shafts. The question is, what were the vikings using for arrow shafting? Was it some form of cane or a species of wood shoot with a pith core? All references I have to viking arrow heads say the shafting did not survive. If I am reading the drawings correctly, the brass nocks may be set up to be inserted into a hollow center of something. Does anyone have more information on the shafting?

      Thank you,
      Edward le Kervere
    • James W
      The shafting could be any wood. It doesn t need to be hollowed out. You can either auger a hole out for the tang or just split the shaft for the length of the
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 14, 2012
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        The shafting could be any wood. It doesn't need to be hollowed out. You can either auger a hole out for the tang or just split the shaft for the length of the tang.

        In either case, it is important to wrap and glue the drilled out or split section.

        Cheers, James

        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "lekervere" <edwoodguy@...> wrote:
        >
        > Since we're on this subject anyway, I have a question:
        > A lot of the arrowheads found in viking era graves are leaf shaped with a long thin tang for mounting to the shaft. Similar tang designs are seen through Asia, and are intended to be mounted on bamboo shafts. The question is, what were the vikings using for arrow shafting? Was it some form of cane or a species of wood shoot with a pith core? All references I have to viking arrow heads say the shafting did not survive. If I am reading the drawings correctly, the brass nocks may be set up to be inserted into a hollow center of something. Does anyone have more information on the shafting?
        >
        > Thank you,
        > Edward le Kervere
        >
      • JDS
        Yes reinforcing the nocks is very important I seem to recall James was marshaling the line (In the agro plex) when i split a fletch right off because I wanted
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 14, 2012
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          Yes reinforcing the nocks is very important
          I seem to recall James was marshaling the line
          (In the agro plex)
          when i split a fletch right off because
          I wanted to shoot my new self nock arrows
          that I had just made.
          Oppsie
          Is
          Johann

          snip
          In either case, it is important to wrap and glue the drilled out or split section.

          Cheers, James
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