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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Horse bow question

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  • arion12@q.com
    You are wrong. You even use the term horsebow in the generic sense on your website :) Composite bow is also a good term for this category of bow. Google
    Message 1 of 43 , Aug 6, 2012
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      You are wrong. You even use the term horsebow in the generic sense on your website :) "Composite bow" is also a good term for this category of bow.

      Google search "horsebow". The way the term is used is generic for the type of bow traditionally shot from horseback.
      Most horse bows are being made by Hungarian Bowyers websites (Kassai, Grozer, Toth, etc), a few Korean bowyers, some Mongolain bowyers, and a Chinese guy just getting into the business on EBay.

      A horsebow is a bow with:
      * static siyah, typically made of wood,
      * a solid grip, again typically of wood
      * limbs that are a sinew, wood lathe, and horn sandwich glued up with fish glue
      * working limbs that tend to be short, but not always
      * a highly curved profile when not strung, in some cases curved into a "c" shape that must be very carefully unwound to string the bow. The Turks actually had a stand to string their flight bows. The bows were kept in humidity controlled cabinets.

      They do not shoot like any other bow type, be it longbow or recurve. They are characterized by their extremely fast speed. They are extremely efficient bows made in areas where wood was scarce and animal parts(horn and sinew) were plentiful ... the Russian/Asian steppes ... grasslands where horses where the main economy.

      Here's a good link to learn about the Hungarians who make horsebows:
      http://www.eastern-archery.com/bowframe.html

      As to making a period subcategory for horsebows made of horn, wood and sinew, it seems rather pointless and/or elitist. I'm guessing that there may be a few of these owned by SCA members? Let's see, if I buy one I can always be #1 in the category in my Kingdom, even if I shoot one arrow per year and score 2 points, because I'm the only one who owns one. I don't see the point!

      Arion the Wanderer



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Luigi Kapaj" <puppy@...>
      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 4:48:24 PM
      Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Horse bow question

      "Horse Bow" is a brand name, not a type of bow. Those bows are made by the
      master horse archer and teacher Kassai Lajos. They are fiberglass bows made
      in the shape of period styles and worth the money. (I own two) There are
      others who make Asian style bows, and you'll notice that the other two
      mentioned in the same price range are also made of fiberglass. BTW - I have
      seen one of the Korean bows in action, it was sweet.

      If you are concerned with period bows made of horn and sinew from Asia like
      the ones used by Mongolians, then you should discuss Composite Bows.
      Depending on source, The prices range from $850 (the ones I import from
      Mongolia) to the $2000-$3000 you will pay for the masterpieces of the likes
      of Jaap of Yumi Bows. (I don't own one... yet) You will be hard pressed to
      find one cheaper as to properly make one of these it takes at least 1 to 2
      years.

      I can see how this would price most people out of a period bow competition,
      but we already allow period-like bows of modern materials in all SCA
      archery, so a period bow only sub category is pointless if you allow
      fiberglass bows.

      PS - The Japanese "Yumi" bow is an asymmetrical longbow that is not of horn
      and sinew construction. Not sure how it got lumped into this discussion
      other than that it is sometimes used on horseback, but then so has any other
      type of bow for that matter. An asymmetric bow only sub category, now that
      would be interesting. It may be Huns vs Japanese only though...


      Puppy
      http://www.NYCMongol.com
    • James Koch
      Gentlemen & Ladies, ... One of my crossbow customers just contacted me with a question I can t properly answer. He is building a crossbow and wants to know
      Message 43 of 43 , Aug 12, 2012
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        Gentlemen & Ladies,
        >
        One of my crossbow customers just contacted me with a question I
        can't properly answer. He is building a crossbow and wants to know
        the minimum weight bolt he should use. He didn't specify a draw
        weight. No doubt this will vary depending on the prod composition,
        mass, and draw weight. I was wondering if there is such a formula,
        and if so where I might find it.
        >
        Jim Koch "Gladius The Alchemist"
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