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Peer-reviewed article on safety of recreational archery

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  • saethryth
    Those of us who are trying to convince local park and recreation authorities to allow target archery, may be interested in the article published in The Journal
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 3, 2012
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      Those of us who are trying to convince local park and recreation authorities to allow target archery, may be interested in the article published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness; June 2012, volume 52(3); pages 293-9.

      Here is a link: http://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/sports-med-physical-fitness/article.php?cod=R40Y2012N03A0293.

      As far as I know, this is the first scientific article on recreational archery (rather than elite athletes).

      Here is the abstract:
      "EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ARCHERY INJURIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR ARCHERY RANGES AND TRAINING PROGRAMS"
      Aim: To assess the incidence of injuries in the general population caused by participation in the sport of target archery or bowhunting.
      Methods: Descriptive analysis of a national probability sample of hospital based treatments for archery-related injuries, over a 10-year period.
      Results: The leading injuries were lacerations (62% ± 2%), which most often occurred through mishandling hunting arrows. Puncture wounds accounted for 8% ±1% and foreign bodies 6%±1%, arising from feathers or vanes embedding in the hand, falling onto an arrow, or a rupturing arrow shaft. Contusions and abrasions, often caused by the bowstring hitting the arm, accounted for 6% ±1% of injuries. Nearly all (99% ± 0.4%) of cases were treated and released. The overall injury rate is 4.4/10,000 participants age 6 and over.
      Conclusion: Contrary to the prevailing perception that archery is inherently dangerous, the evidence shows that recreational archery is a very safe sport – safer than popular field sports where people risk collisions or falls, such as soccer, basketball or baseball. The injury rate from lacerations could be significantly reduced if bow hunter education courses emphasized safe handling of broadhead arrows. The data suggest that nearly all acute injuries in target archery can be prevented through participation in an accredited training program and the use of basic protective gear (arm guards and shooting gloves). All archery education programs should focus on proper archery stance and joint strengthening to minimize chronic shoulder and back injuries.
    • John Edgerton
      Thank you Saethryth This is very useful information. Everyone should print up a copy of the article and save it to present to the powers-that-be when needed.
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 3, 2012
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        Thank you Saethryth

        This is very useful information. Everyone should print up a copy of the article and save it to present to the powers-that-be when needed. 

        Jon


        From: saethryth <suepalsbo@...>
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, July 3, 2012 8:48:27 AM
        Subject: [SCA-Archery] Peer-reviewed article on safety of recreational archery

         

        Those of us who are trying to convince local park and recreation authorities to allow target archery, may be interested in the article published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness; June 2012, volume 52(3); pages 293-9.

        Here is a link: http://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/sports-med-physical-fitness/article.php?cod=R40Y2012N03A0293.

        As far as I know, this is the first scientific article on recreational archery (rather than elite athletes).

        Here is the abstract:
        "EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ARCHERY INJURIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR ARCHERY RANGES AND TRAINING PROGRAMS"
        Aim: To assess the incidence of injuries in the general population caused by participation in the sport of target archery or bowhunting.
        Methods: Descriptive analysis of a national probability sample of hospital based treatments for archery-related injuries, over a 10-year period.
        Results: The leading injuries were lacerations (62% ± 2%), which most often occurred through mishandling hunting arrows. Puncture wounds accounted for 8% ±1% and foreign bodies 6%±1%, arising from feathers or vanes embedding in the hand, falling onto an arrow, or a rupturing arrow shaft. Contusions and abrasions, often caused by the bowstring hitting the arm, accounted for 6% ±1% of injuries. Nearly all (99% ± 0.4%) of cases were treated and released. The overall injury rate is 4.4/10,000 participants age 6 and over.
        Conclusion: Contrary to the prevailing perception that archery is inherently dangerous, the evidence shows that recreational archery is a very safe sport – safer than popular field sports where people risk collisions or falls, such as soccer, basketball or baseball. The injury rate from lacerations could be significantly reduced if bow hunter education courses emphasized safe handling of broadhead arrows. The data suggest that nearly all acute injuries in target archery can be prevented through participation in an accredited training program and the use of basic protective gear (arm guards and shooting gloves). All archery education programs should focus on proper archery stance and joint strengthening to minimize chronic shoulder and back injuries.

      • Joe Klovance
        This is a paper about injuries to participants. In general local parks and recreation authorities are more concerned with bystanders accidentally being in
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 3, 2012
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          This is a paper about injuries to participants. In general local parks and recreation authorities are more concerned with bystanders accidentally being in places they should not be or arrows accidentally shot in incorrect directions and people being skewered by the arrows. This paper says nothing about those scenarios. This paper may assuage worries about too many ambulance trips but not bystander liability.

          Gryffyd

          To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
          From: suepalsbo@...
          Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2012 14:26:16 +0000
          Subject: [SCA-Archery] Peer-reviewed article on safety of recreational archery

           
          Those of us who are trying to convince local park and recreation authorities to allow target archery, may be interested in the article published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness; June 2012, volume 52(3); pages 293-9.

          Here is a link: http://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/sports-med-physical-fitness/article.php?cod=R40Y2012N03A0293.

          As far as I know, this is the first scientific article on recreational archery (rather than elite athletes).

          Here is the abstract:
          "EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ARCHERY INJURIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR ARCHERY RANGES AND TRAINING PROGRAMS"
          Aim: To assess the incidence of injuries in the general population caused by participation in the sport of target archery or bowhunting.
          Methods: Descriptive analysis of a national probability sample of hospital based treatments for archery-related injuries, over a 10-year period.
          Results: The leading injuries were lacerations (62% ± 2%), which most often occurred through mishandling hunting arrows. Puncture wounds accounted for 8% ±1% and foreign bodies 6%±1%, arising from feathers or vanes embedding in the hand, falling onto an arrow, or a rupturing arrow shaft. Contusions and abrasions, often caused by the bowstring hitting the arm, accounted for 6% ±1% of injuries. Nearly all (99% ± 0.4%) of cases were treated and released. The overall injury rate is 4.4/10,000 participants age 6 and over.
          Conclusion: Contrary to the prevailing perception that archery is inherently dangerous, the evidence shows that recreational archery is a very safe sport – safer than popular field sports where people risk collisions or falls, such as soccer, basketball or baseball. The injury rate from lacerations could be significantly reduced if bow hunter education courses emphasized safe handling of broadhead arrows. The data suggest that nearly all acute injuries in target archery can be prevented through participation in an accredited training program and the use of basic protective gear (arm guards and shooting gloves). All archery education programs should focus on proper archery stance and joint strengthening to minimize chronic shoulder and back injuries.


        • Bill Tait
          Agreed. This article would be very useful for developing a school-based archery program. Having our marshals trained and registered through your (a) National
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 3, 2012
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            Agreed. This article would be very useful for developing a school-based archery program. 

            Having our marshals trained and registered through your (a) National Archery Association would be more useful for convincing of setup-safety.

            William

            On Tue, Jul 3, 2012 at 9:23 AM, Joe Klovance <jklovanc@...> wrote:
             

            This is a paper about injuries to participants. In general local parks and recreation authorities are more concerned with bystanders accidentally being in places they should not be or arrows accidentally shot in incorrect directions and people being skewered by the arrows. This paper says nothing about those scenarios. This paper may assuage worries about too many ambulance trips but not bystander liability.

            Gryffyd

            To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            From: suepalsbo@...
            Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2012 14:26:16 +0000

            Subject: [SCA-Archery] Peer-reviewed article on safety of recreational archery

             
            Those of us who are trying to convince local park and recreation authorities to allow target archery, may be interested in the article published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness; June 2012, volume 52(3); pages 293-9.

            Here is a link: http://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/sports-med-physical-fitness/article.php?cod=R40Y2012N03A0293.

            As far as I know, this is the first scientific article on recreational archery (rather than elite athletes).

            Here is the abstract:
            "EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ARCHERY INJURIES - IMPLICATIONS FOR ARCHERY RANGES AND TRAINING PROGRAMS"
            Aim: To assess the incidence of injuries in the general population caused by participation in the sport of target archery or bowhunting.
            Methods: Descriptive analysis of a national probability sample of hospital based treatments for archery-related injuries, over a 10-year period.
            Results: The leading injuries were lacerations (62% ± 2%), which most often occurred through mishandling hunting arrows. Puncture wounds accounted for 8% ±1% and foreign bodies 6%±1%, arising from feathers or vanes embedding in the hand, falling onto an arrow, or a rupturing arrow shaft. Contusions and abrasions, often caused by the bowstring hitting the arm, accounted for 6% ±1% of injuries. Nearly all (99% ± 0.4%) of cases were treated and released. The overall injury rate is 4.4/10,000 participants age 6 and over.
            Conclusion: Contrary to the prevailing perception that archery is inherently dangerous, the evidence shows that recreational archery is a very safe sport – safer than popular field sports where people risk collisions or falls, such as soccer, basketball or baseball. The injury rate from lacerations could be significantly reduced if bow hunter education courses emphasized safe handling of broadhead arrows. The data suggest that nearly all acute injuries in target archery can be prevented through participation in an accredited training program and the use of basic protective gear (arm guards and shooting gloves). All archery education programs should focus on proper archery stance and joint strengthening to minimize chronic shoulder and back injuries.



          • Steven Casort
            It will not allow me on the server!  Can someone please send me a copy of this artical? In Service Ihon MacLucasCAID Minister of Archersaka Steve Casort It
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 4, 2012
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              It will not allow me on the server!  Can someone please send me a copy of this artical?

              In Service
              Ihon MacLucas
              CAID Minister of Archers
              aka Steve Casort
            • saethryth
              Since the copyright is owned by the publisher, you ll need to purchase a copy from them through their website. Typically the publisher releases the copyright
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 5, 2012
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                Since the copyright is owned by the publisher, you'll need to purchase a copy from them through their website. Typically the publisher releases the copyright a year or two after publication, at which time it is available to download for free.

                --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Steven Casort <ihon_macl@...> wrote:
                >
                > It will not allow me on the server!  Can someone please send me a copy of this artical?
                >
                > In Service
                > Ihon MacLucasCAID Minister of Archersaka Steve Casort
                >
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