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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Use of optical aids on the archery range

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  • Jim Pickette
    I certainly concurr on adapting to persons with disabilities. THAT is already in the rules. Q: Period telescopes for the rest of us? The evidence does not
    Message 1 of 43 , Jun 1, 2012
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      I certainly concurr on adapting to persons with disabilities. THAT is already in the rules.

      Q: Period telescopes for the rest of us? The evidence does not yet support it.

      JoO
      Fidelibus

      ---- J C Ronsen <jcronsen@...> wrote:
      > On Thu, 31 May 2012 15:01:07 -0400, Karl W. Evoy wrote:
      > > IIRC, the original question was the use of optical aids during
      > > official shoots. The discussion then veered towards the periodiness
      > > of some of types of telescopes. If you are presenting at the
      > > serious re-enactment level, anything you have visable should be
      > > period. The SCA has a more voluntary standard. My understanding of
      > > the rules, at say Pennsic, which are "The use of spotters is
      > > forbidden", then an optical aid should be cleared by the MIC; that
      > > said, I would have no problem allowing a simple scope if the archer
      > > was unable to see where the shafts are landing. Any type of
      > > rangefinder, however, would be forbidden. If you are attempting to
      > > shoot in a period manner, then "Eyeball Mk.I" is your choice;
      > > that's what they had avalable.
      > > Karl
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > My general rule of thumb is this:
      >
      > For practice: if an archer wants to use a spotter's scope,
      > rangefinders, extra eyes, spyglasses, etc. to help them adjust their
      > sight marks at a practice; I have no problem with that.
      >
      > For a tournament: no for 99% of shooters. I have met (and shot with)
      > two archers, over the years, who were functionally blind (everything
      > is one big blur beyond five feet) and used spotter's scopes to help
      > them identify the targets, but did not use them as sights for their
      > bows. Both of them asked a marshal to stand next to the target they
      > needed to shot at and used the scopes to identify which blob they were
      > supposed to shoot at. I do not have an issue with the small percentage
      > of archers who need this kind of assistance in order to find the
      > target, but when I marshal a tourney, I do not allow such tools for
      > archers with good eyes and or glasses. Particularly not range finders:
      > most of my ranges are at unknown distances.
      >
      > I have used a small spotter's scope, as a marshal, (it was a nice one
      > that I used for almost 30 years, but it died last year) for a handful
      > of shoots. All of the shoots were variations of the same theme: shoot
      > one arrow or bolt; hit a target at a long range and advance to the
      > next round; miss and you are out. One such shoot involved a full sized
      > knight on horseback, made out of corplast, at the bottom of a hill, at
      > around 130 yards. You had to keep shooting until you either hit the
      > horse or you hit the knight in an un-armored spot. I find that a good
      > spotter's scope can save extra trips 100+ yards downrange and back if
      > all I am interested in is if the archer hit a target. A spyglass would
      > look less modern, but my scope was small enough that I could keep it
      > hidden away in my quiver.
      >
      >
      >
      > ska: Baron Caleb Reynolds
      > mka: Caleb Ronsen
      > aka: Bubba th' Barbarian
      > Baron of the Court of AEthelmearc
      > Because you can't spell "Old Blarney Sec" without Caleb Reynolds.
      >
      > There's no substitute for reading. Well, not MY stuff, but generally.
      >
      >
    • Chris Ivins
      M Lords and Ladies, I am relatively new (within the last year) to archery, so forgive any ignorance or naivety on my part, but occasionally I will use a set of
      Message 43 of 43 , Jun 1, 2012
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        M'Lords and Ladies,

        I am relatively new (within the last year) to archery, so forgive any ignorance or naivety on my part, but occasionally I will use a set of binoculars during our practices to help call where an arrow hits at the longer distances so that a fellow archer can refine their aim point, but I do not ever intend to use them for that purpose at an event.
        Also, I am sure some of the Kingdoms will have different guidelines on marks on the bow limbs, but in the An Tir Book of Target, it states,
        "i. Sighting and/or range marks on the limbs or riser are allowed, except in Divisions or competitions that exclude their use."
        In my own practice, I have considered adding tape with simple "hash marks" to figure out the best aim points for the different distances on Royal Rounds, but by using tape, I intend to remove them for ANY event /competition I enter, the marks will be used only for practice, and only to get used to aiming with the loaner bow I am using.

        -Respectfully, and In Service,
                                                          Lord Iurii Levchenich
                                                          Junior Target Archery Marshal-In-Training
         

        --- On Fri, 6/1/12, James Koch <alchem@...> wrote:

        From: James Koch <alchem@...>
        Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Use of optical aids on the archery range
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, June 1, 2012, 7:40 PM

        Gentlemen & Ladies,
        >
        Define optical aids.  Binoculars, telescopes, spotting scopes, and
        some range finders utilize lenses not available until after the SCA
        period.  They are for our intents and purposes modern.  On the other
        hand, some range finders do not require a lens.  A guy who used to be
        an active shooter here in the Midrealm had marks on the limbs of his
        crossbow that indicated a standard height or width when viewed at
        various distances.  He would look at the target with both eyes open
        and could accurately judge the range if he knew one of the target's
        dimensions.  There were no "optics" involved other than those of his
        eyes.  He simply compared the known target dimension to the spacing
        between the marks to get the approximate range and then
        interpolated.  It's hard to describe, but easy to do.  Of course this
        series of marks was only useful when dealing with unknown ranges.
        >
        Jim Koch "Gladius The Alchemist"     



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