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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: was PVCV bows

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  • Ld.blackmoon
    greetings there are 2 in northkeep , ansteorra, 3 if you count crossbows : / ( one just moved away ) just so people know, there are other groups out there that
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 30, 2012
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      greetings
       
      there are 2 in northkeep , ansteorra, 3 if you count crossbows : /
      ( one just moved away )
       
      just so people know, there are other groups out there that also teach selfbow and laminate wood bow making .
      o-jam in northern Oklahoma ( Ansteorra ), and the Ozark selfbow jamboree in marshal Mo.( Calontir " I think " ) are the ones I know of, there must be others out there somewhere else too ; )
       
      heaven forbid the heavies hear of this sacrilege , but how many people have made rattan bows  ??
      I got old rattan given to me and it had cracks in the handle region, so I didn't get to present it to the child archer this year, but next year I plan on having one for both child and youth archery champions at our event ; )
      ( no they aren't just for kids, we shave them way down to get them light enough, but we scaled a thicker one this year, it scaled out at # 46 @ 28"   )
       
      Be Safe , Be Happy, Have Fun .
      Arthur
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 8:11 PM
      Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: was PVCV bows

       

      That's great, Guy! And a prouder young lady you'll not see, I'll wager!
      So, how many bowyers are out there, and where are you located?
      Frode

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Guy Taylor <guy.taylor@...> wrote:
      >
      > I teach beginning bowmaking in my area to anyone interested. Due to
      limited
      > facilities we do it at events on an as-needed basis or upon
      request at mundane
      > archery gatherings I attend.
      > At this year's Great Western War in October I'll have on going bow
      making
      > demonstration at my booth for the duration of the event. At last
      year's war a
      > young lady began and finished her first wood bow during the event.
      > Â
      > Guy
      > The new Greenman Archery website

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    • James W
      First choice would be to make a unbacked wooden bow. If you have to back the bow, don t use linen. Instead, use fiberglass cloth tape designed for sealing
      Message 2 of 14 , May 1, 2012
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        First choice would be to make a unbacked wooden bow.

        If you have to back the bow, don't use linen. Instead, use fiberglass cloth tape designed for sealing seams in boat building.

        Just because linen is period doesn't make a linen backed bow period. There are no examples of period bows being backed by linen nor any evidence that I am aware of it ever being done in period. Sinew backing, sure, there's plenty of evidence of that.

        Fiberglass cloth will dry clear giving the appearance of unbacked bow and, hence, a more period looking bow. In addition, the fiberglass cloth will offer more protection from the bow breaking when using less then ideal wood which is the only point of backing with linen. If one is concerned about fiberglass giving an unfair advantage, that would apply to a proper fiberglass lamination strip but not really to the cloth tape I am suggesting.

        I realize that on some traditional bowyer forums the use of fiberglass including the cloth tape variety is taboo but fiberglass is not banned in the SCA.

        James



        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "frode_kettilsson" <anthonyspangler@...> wrote:
        >
        > I sympathize with the cost issues for new archers (my first bow was a
        > 30# wrist rattling fiberglass Martin, literally, it was the only kind I
        > could afford), and I applaud the creativity that allows a functioning
        > bow to be made from a PVC pipe. Hoobah! However, I have to agree with
        > Thomas and James, too. The cost in materials for a perfectly
        > serviceable linen backed red oak (or maple) board bow is less that $10,
        > and the tools to make it can be had for as little as $30! But, for lots
        > of Gentles, this is Mysterious Stuff, fraught with Danger! So here's a
        > question; we have people who will teach you to shoot, teach you to fight
        > heavy, to fence, to dance, to make cheese, and to properly yell "Oyez!"
        > Is there anything like this in place to teach people how to make their
        > own archery equipment? It would, of course, have to pass all the
        > necessary inspections, but with a qualified instructor at their elbow,
        > people often find themselves capable of the most astonishing things!
        > Trust me, if I can make a bow, anyone can make a bow!
        > Instructors would have to be able to advise and help with wood
        > selection, technique, tool use, finishing, etc., but the same must be
        > true of all the pursuits mentioned above. And, all of the Marshal's I
        > know can spot bad things, even if they are not bowyers themselves.
        > Is this something that already exists? Is it something that could
        > (should) be created? After all, we are an educational entity!
        > Just Askin'
        > Frode
        >
      • frode_kettilsson
        No disagreement there, James! I use linen primarily because it s fairly inexpensive, and easy to glue with wood glue (I prefer Titebond III). And with board
        Message 3 of 14 , May 1, 2012
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          No disagreement there, James!  I use linen primarily because it's fairly inexpensive, and easy to glue with wood glue (I prefer Titebond III).   And with board bows it's sometimes hard to know for sure what you're getting into, even when the grain looks good.  I've blown up a light linen backed bow (blown up!), but I've also had linen save me from serious injury on a much heavier bow.  A backing is primarily a peace of mind thing, especially while learning.  Linen also gives you a canvas to work on if you're into the decorative thing, and some folks are.  Not necessarily period, although some of the Turkish bows were quite elaborately decorated.
          But, agreed, an unbacked wood bow is the gold standard.
          Frode

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "James W" <jameswolfden@...> wrote:
          >
          > First choice would be to make a unbacked wooden bow.
          >
          > If you have to back the bow, don't use linen. Instead, use fiberglass cloth tape designed for sealing seams in boat building.
          >
          > Just because linen is period doesn't make a linen backed bow period. There are no examples of period bows being backed by linen nor any evidence that I am aware of it ever being done in period. Sinew backing, sure, there's plenty of evidence of that.
          >
          > Fiberglass cloth will dry clear giving the appearance of unbacked bow and, hence, a more period looking bow. In addition, the fiberglass cloth will offer more protection from the bow breaking when using less then ideal wood which is the only point of backing with linen. If one is concerned about fiberglass giving an unfair advantage, that would apply to a proper fiberglass lamination strip but not really to the cloth tape I am suggesting.
          >
          > I realize that on some traditional bowyer forums the use of fiberglass including the cloth tape variety is taboo but fiberglass is not banned in the SCA.
          >
          > James
          >

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