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Re: shaft material

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  • cianofstorvik
    There was a company a few years back that was importing shafts from Australia that were described as Silverwood . No indigenous tree to Austrial is called
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 6, 2011
      There was a company a few years back that was importing shafts from Australia that were described as "Silverwood". No indigenous tree to Austrial is called "silverwood". There was much speculation that this was an ash wood, as it had very similar properties (heavier than cedar or poplar, but not as heavy as oak, similar grain to ash), but was probably tasmanian oak.
      They came tapered or "barreled", and were available in spine weights upwards of 75# and as low as 35#. I have a couple dozen 60# ones left unfletched, but am not giving them up as the source dried up. They were about 1.5x as expensive as port orford cedar, but were much tougher and so saved money over replacing broken PO shafts. And of course they came pre-barreled and not prone to warping which was nice.

      Anyhow, I would ask around locally for Tasmanian Oak or "Silverwood" tapered shafts, and see if you can find who's making them. If you find out, I'd like to know if they're still exporting, as they are really nice shafts.
      -Cian of Storvik
      Peasant
      Kingdom of Atlantia
    • Des & Jan Howard
      Cian Silver Ash (Flindersia schottiana)is large Australian native rainforest tree. The only person, to my knowledge, making Silver Ash shafting was a bloke in
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 6, 2011
        Cian
        Silver Ash (Flindersia schottiana)is large Australian
        native rainforest tree. The only person, to my
        knowledge, making Silver Ash shafting was a bloke in
        Queensland who has gone out of the game & sold off his
        gear.
        Tasmanian Oak is the name used for three almost
        identical species of eucalypt hardwoods that are
        normally marketed collectively. E.delegatensis, E.
        regnans & E. obliqua. Apart from pine & MDF this is the
        material most commonly available for timber trim &
        dowelling around these parts.
        Tasmanian Oak & Silver Ash, (along with Port Orford
        Cedar & Ramen), are the only Lochacian acceptable
        timbers for combat arrow shafting. I don't recall
        timber restrictions for target archery. I use Tas. Oak
        dowelling for both target & combat arrows, very
        stringently selecting 5/16" in 2.4m lengths from a
        large Bunnings. The very best go to target use,
        t'others go to combat.
        Ranif

        On 7/10/2011 7:48 AM, cianofstorvik wrote:
        > There was a company a few years back that was importing shafts
        > from Australia that were described as "Silverwood".
        > No indigenous tree to Austrial is called "silverwood".
        > There was much speculation that this was an ash wood,
        > as it had very similar properties (heavier than cedar or poplar,
        > but not as heavy as oak, similar grain to ash), but was probably tasmanian oak.
        > Anyhow, I would ask around locally for Tasmanian Oak
        > or "Silverwood" tapered shafts, and see if you can find
        > who's making them. If you find out, I'd like to know if
        > they're still exporting, as they are really nice shafts.
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