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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: cresting

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  • James of the Lake
    And I don t see any cresting in the shaft either! James
    Message 1 of 25 , Sep 7, 2011
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      And I don't see any cresting in the shaft either!

      James

      On Sep 7, 2011, at 9:40 PM, Joe Klovance wrote:



      Do you mean this portrait? http://www.artcyclopedia.org/art/giovanni-antonio-boltraffio-saint.jpg

      If that is not the portrait please ignore the rest of this post. Interesting this is that the quills on the fetching is pointed in the wrong direction. There is also no visible means of supporting the "arrow" in that position. The left arm would be in a different position. I think that is al light spear and not an arrow.

      Gryffyd


    • Joe Klovance
      Here is a closeup of the fletching . http://www.mythrealmaille.com/images/sca/cresting.JPG There is some colour banding but it is difficult to see. There is
      Message 2 of 25 , Sep 7, 2011
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        Here is a closeup of the "fletching". http://www.mythrealmaille.com/images/sca/cresting.JPG

        There is some colour banding but it is difficult to see. There is another anomaly; The shaft gets bigger below the "fletching". I have never seen that on an arrow. I have seen javelins with a heavier shaft attached to a lighter top section; a bit like a pilum. To me it looks more and more like a javelin or spear.

        Gryffyd


        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        From: jotl2008@...
        Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2011 21:55:19 -0700
        Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: cresting

         
        And I don't see any cresting in the shaft either!

        James

        On Sep 7, 2011, at 9:40 PM, Joe Klovance wrote:



        Do you mean this portrait? http://www.artcyclopedia.org/art/giovanni-antonio-boltraffio-saint.jpg

        If that is not the portrait please ignore the rest of this post. Interesting this is that the quills on the fetching is pointed in the wrong direction. There is also no visible means of supporting the "arrow" in that position. The left arm would be in a different position. I think that is al light spear and not an arrow.

        Gryffyd



      • Karl W. Evoy
        Last time I was at the Museum (a couple of months ago), the painting was not on display; they had rearrainged the armour court. I took a number of pics at
        Message 3 of 25 , Sep 8, 2011
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          Last time I was at the Museum (a couple of months ago), the painting was not on display; they had rearrainged the armour court.
          I took a number of pics at close range before that, but when I searched my digital pics just now, they were'nt there. I must have used the film camera (how retro of me). I'll try to find the prints, but can't give you an estimate of that (house cleaning).
          Ancel
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, September 07, 2011 10:30 PM
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: cresting

           

          Gentlemen & Ladies, 
          >
          I went to the CMA site, but the image is not detailed enough to show the bolts.  I guess I'll have to trek back to the museum for better detail.
          >
          Jim Koch "Gladius The Alchemist"
          >
          >
          >At 10:21 PM 9/7/2011, you wrote:



          If you just search for the painting name you will find a PDF from the museum showing the painting.
           
          Gaelen

          From: Dan Stratton <agincort@...>
          To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 9:54 PM
          Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: cresting

           
          >If you have any documentation for cresting I would be most interested in it.

          >Thanks,
          >cog

          For what it's worth,
          At the Cleveland Museum of Art, in a German paiting from the 1540s, the hunting scene has a hunt with numerous crossbow shooters - close inspection shows the bolts marked with colored banding. The painting is "Hunting Near Hartenfels Castle" by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553)
          Date: 1540
          ...........................
          Ian Gourdon of Glen Awe
          Midrealm Forester - OP
          "- bows of carved wood strong for use, with well-seasoned strings of hemp, and arrows sharp-pointed whizzing in flight."


        • greg u
          I see that anally retentive SCA Documenturds are here trying to muddy up reality with supposed Documents . Documented by whom? Some know nothing court hanger
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 8, 2011
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            I see that anally retentive SCA Documenturds are here trying to muddy up reality with supposed "Documents". Documented by whom? Some know nothing court hanger on that did not have anything to do for a day in 1300s?
            And that court jester becomes the Knowing all Authority for banding on into infinity; just because he thought he would write something down for a gag. Stupid!
            Do the work in the period way with period material---not with menards wood and elmers glue and plastic nocks---and after a little while you might understand what it means to make arrows.
            The reality is "Good" arrows were hard to make and one would only use good arrows in a contest with other archers. Since where you lived will dictate the type of birds you can get fetching from most of all the contestants of an archery shoot off would have the same type of bird feathers as fletching. (Undocumented Reality) Maybe some would use robin feathers instead of seagull feathers or maybe some would cut the feathers a little different to retrieve their own arrows but conflicts on field would be inevitable. Either honestly or maliciously, arguments about who's arrow it was would have occurred since from the earliest time of archery. Say 10,000 yrs ago (undocumented). And when there was conflicts it would escalate to a fight with fists or knives and then there would be injuries to both sides. (undocumented)
            This is not a good thing for social order or regional stability! Hence based on the reality of the arrow making process and using rational logic and personal experience in conflict resolution I hypothesize that plant dye colors were used on arrow shafts and maybe fetching from since the earliest time of archery contests. Probably before the Sumerians were around and Certainly before the britans and picts paddled over to that miserable island. (undocumented reality)

            Balac the period wood worker
            http://scawood.webs.com

            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Joe Klovance <jklovanc@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Here is a closeup of the "fletching". http://www.mythrealmaille.com/images/sca/cresting.JPG
            >
            > There is some colour banding but it is difficult to see. There is another anomaly; The shaft gets bigger below the "fletching". I have never seen that on an arrow. I have seen javelins with a heavier shaft attached to a lighter top section; a bit like a pilum. To me it looks more and more like a javelin or spear.
            >
            > Gryffyd
            >
            > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            > From: jotl2008@...
            > Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2011 21:55:19 -0700
            > Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: cresting
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            > And I don't see any cresting in the shaft either!
            > James
            > On Sep 7, 2011, at 9:40 PM, Joe Klovance wrote:
            >
            > Do you mean this portrait? http://www.artcyclopedia.org/art/giovanni-antonio-boltraffio-saint.jpg
            >
            > If that is not the portrait please ignore the rest of this post. Interesting this is that the quills on the fetching is pointed in the wrong direction. There is also no visible means of supporting the "arrow" in that position. The left arm would be in a different position. I think that is al light spear and not an arrow.
            >
            > Gryffyd
            >
          • John Edgerton
            Where it gets larger below the fletching could be a bulbous nock to allow for a thicker string than the shaft by its self would allow. Perhaps in this case not
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 8, 2011
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            Where it gets larger below the fletching could be a bulbous nock to allow for a thicker string than the shaft by its self would allow. Perhaps in this case not tapered at the base of the nock.
          • John Edgerton
            I do hope that this post was done tongue in cheek. Even so, it goes over the line for politeness for this group. Continued posts in this vein will cause the
            Message 6 of 25 , Sep 8, 2011
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              I do hope that this post was done tongue in cheek.  Even so, it goes over the line for politeness for this group. Continued posts in this vein will cause the poster to placed on moderated status.  I have no problem with the theories expressed, just the "Documenturds" and confrontational altitude. 

              Sir Jon Fitz-Rauf, group owner

              On Sep 8, 2011, at 8:17 AM, greg u wrote:

               

              I see that anally retentive SCA Documenturds are here trying to muddy up reality with supposed "Documents". Documented by whom? Some know nothing court hanger on that did not have anything to do for a day in 1300s?
              And that court jester becomes the Knowing all Authority for banding on into infinity; just because he thought he would write something down for a gag. Stupid!
              Do the work in the period way with period material---not with menards wood and elmers glue and plastic nocks---and after a little while you might understand what it means to make arrows.
              The reality is "Good" arrows were hard to make and one would only use good arrows in a contest with other archers. Since where you lived will dictate the type of birds you can get fetching from most of all the contestants of an archery shoot off would have the same type of bird feathers as fletching. (Undocumented Reality) Maybe some would use robin feathers instead of seagull feathers or maybe some would cut the feathers a little different to retrieve their own arrows but conflicts on field would be inevitable. Either honestly or maliciously, arguments about who's arrow it was would have occurred since from the earliest time of archery. Say 10,000 yrs ago (undocumented). And when there was conflicts it would escalate to a fight with fists or knives and then there would be injuries to both sides. (undocumented)
              This is not a good thing for social order or regional stability! Hence based on the reality of the arrow making process and using rational logic and personal experience in conflict resolution I hypothesize that plant dye colors were used on arrow shafts and maybe fetching from since the earliest time of archery contests. Probably before the Sumerians were around and Certainly before the britans and picts paddled over to that miserable island. (undocumented reality)

              Balac the period wood worker
              http://scawood.webs.com

              -

            • Brighid ni Muirenn
              The Boltraffio portrait at the Timken Museum is now at http://www.timkenmuseum.org/collection/italian/portrait-youth-holding-arrow. Giovanni Antonio
              Message 7 of 25 , Sep 8, 2011
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                The Boltraffio portrait at the Timken Museum is now at http://www.timkenmuseum.org/collection/italian/portrait-youth-holding-arrow . Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio, Portrait of a Youth Holding an Arrow, c1500-1510. Brighid ni Muirenn

                On Wed, Sep 7, 2011 at 6:54 PM, Dan Stratton <agincort@...> wrote:
                 

                >If you have any documentation for cresting I would be most interested in it.

                >Thanks,
                >cog

                For what it's worth,
                At the Cleveland Museum of Art, in a German paiting from the 1540s, the hunting scene has a hunt with numerous crossbow shooters - close inspection shows the bolts marked with colored banding. The painting is "Hunting Near Hartenfels Castle" by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553)

                Date: 1540

                ........................... 
                Ian Gourdon of Glen Awe
                Midrealm Forester - OP
                "- bows of carved wood strong for use, with well-seasoned strings of hemp, and arrows sharp-pointed whizzing in flight."



              • Nest verch Tangwistel
                Some people prefer just guessing so they don t have to do any research, and other prefer having some sort of proof that something was done. There is no reason
                Message 8 of 25 , Sep 8, 2011
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                  Some people prefer just guessing so they don't have to do any research, and other prefer having some sort of proof that something was done. There is no reason to denigrate anyone for their personnal preference.
                   
                  I remember reading a 16th century book that talked about which part of the animal the was awarded to the person whose arrow made the kill when hunting with the king. They specifically mentioned the person's mark on the arrow which indicated the owner. Unfortunately, I do not remember what source that was from. I will see if I can find it again for the people who would prefer not to just make random guesses.
                   
                  Nest

                  --- On Thu, 9/8/11, greg u <balacorelanger@...> wrote:

                  From: greg u <balacorelanger@...>
                  Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: cresting
                  To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thursday, September 8, 2011, 11:17 AM

                   
                  I see that anally retentive SCA Documenturds are here trying to muddy up reality with supposed "Documents". Documented by whom? Some know nothing court hanger on that did not have anything to do for a day in 1300s?
                  And that court jester becomes the Knowing all Authority for banding on into infinity; just because he thought he would write something down for a gag. Stupid!
                  Do the work in the period way with period material---not with menards wood and elmers glue and plastic nocks---and after a little while you might understand what it means to make arrows.
                  The reality is "Good" arrows were hard to make and one would only use good arrows in a contest with other archers. Since where you lived will dictate the type of birds you can get fetching from most of all the contestants of an archery shoot off would have the same type of bird feathers as fletching. (Undocumented Reality) Maybe some would use robin feathers instead of seagull feathers or maybe some would cut the feathers a little different to retrieve their own arrows but conflicts on field would be inevitable. Either honestly or maliciously, arguments about who's arrow it was would have occurred since from the earliest time of archery. Say 10,000 yrs ago (undocumented). And when there was conflicts it would escalate to a fight with fists or knives and then there would be injuries to both sides. (undocumented)
                  This is not a good thing for social order or regional stability! Hence based on the reality of the arrow making process and using rational logic and personal experience in conflict resolution I hypothesize that plant dye colors were used on arrow shafts and maybe fetching from since the earliest time of archery contests. Probably before the Sumerians were around and Certainly before the britans and picts paddled over to that miserable island. (undocumented reality)

                  Balac the period wood worker
                  http://scawood.webs.com

                  --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Joe Klovance <jklovanc@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Here is a closeup of the "fletching". http://www.mythrealmaille.com/images/sca/cresting.JPG
                  >
                  > There is some colour banding but it is difficult to see. There is another anomaly; The shaft gets bigger below the "fletching". I have never seen that on an arrow. I have seen javelins with a heavier shaft attached to a lighter top section; a bit like a pilum. To me it looks more and more like a javelin or spear.
                  >
                  > Gryffyd
                  >
                  > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: jotl2008@...
                  > Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2011 21:55:19 -0700
                  > Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: cresting
                  >
                  >
                  >
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                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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                  > And I don't see any cresting in the shaft either!
                  > James
                  > On Sep 7, 2011, at 9:40 PM, Joe Klovance wrote:
                  >
                  > Do you mean this portrait? http://www.artcyclopedia.org/art/giovanni-antonio-boltraffio-saint.jpg
                  >
                  > If that is not the portrait please ignore the rest of this post. Interesting this is that the quills on the fetching is pointed in the wrong direction. There is also no visible means of supporting the "arrow" in that position. The left arm would be in a different position. I think that is al light spear and not an arrow.
                  >
                  > Gryffyd
                  >

                • richard johnson
                  I understand the need for cresting, which is why I built a cresting jig and created my own crest based on my arms (black band with white spots with a centers
                  Message 9 of 25 , Sep 8, 2011
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                    I understand the need for cresting, which is why I built a cresting jig and created my own crest based on my arms (black band with white spots with a centers white band with a centered red stripe).
                    But as for historic documentation for cresting????  I have no idea.
                     
                    What we would do is to argue.  Since few of us had uniform arrows, we'd try to choose arrows that matched fletching or shaft color or such so when we argued, I would say "All my arrows have a red nock-feather and white feathers" or some such description.
                    No one bothered to marktheir arrows though once I tried to paint a black oval on my shafts before the fletching..
                     
                    I suppose that is how fletching came to be.
                    But i leave it to the experts on this list to tell us if and how and when.

                    --
                    Rick Johnson
                    http://Rick-Johnson.webs.com
                    "Those who give up a little freedom in return for a little imagined security will soon find that they have neither."
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