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Re: [SCA-Archery] Digest Number 3705

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  • bluecat@neo.rr.com
    Advice on identifying one arrows was asked for politely, and was politely given. I stand by what I have said- Cresting is period. The banding patterns were in
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 7, 2011
      Advice on identifying one arrows was asked for politely, and was politely given.

      I stand by what I have said- Cresting is period. The banding patterns were in fact registered as I have said.

      As you have asked, I now politely offer a resource. The Worshipful Company of Fletchers in England dates to
      1371. I suggest you read here:

      http://www.fletchers.org.uk/historyarrowmaking.html

      Arrows continue to be banded to this day as a means of marking them. Specialized tape is sold commercially for
      that purpose unless it is done by hand.

      Enjoy!

      Dirk Edward of Frisia





      Banding ( cresting) of arrows has been done in the SCA a long time

      On 9/7/2011 7:46 AM, SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com wrote:
      >
      >
      > Posted by: "The Greys" cogworks@...
      > <mailto:cogworks@...?Subject=%20Re%3A%20Pennsic%20Archery%20Help> houseofgrey
      > <http://profiles.yahoo.com/houseofgrey>
      >
      >
      > Tue Sep 6, 2011 5:36 am (PDT)
      >
      >
      >
      > Dirk Edward,
      > First let me say I am NOT a documentation fanatic! Having said that, my reading said that arrows were not
      > crested in period. During war it made little difference whose arrow made the kill, just that it made a kill.
      > For hunting it was often not the Lord's shaft that took the game but one of his beaters. They marked their
      > shafts with their mark so that the one deemed the kill shot got the largest piece of the game (this from
      > Gaston Phoebus' hunting book). I have also seen actual period arrows and bolts in the armor museum in Vienna
      > Austria and do not recall seeing cresting on the shafts. If you have any documentation for cresting I would
      > be most interested in it.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > cog
    • Taslen
      Dirk,   Greetings what a wonderful site!   Gaelen From: bluecat@neo.rr.com To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, September
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 7, 2011
        Dirk,
         
        Greetings what a wonderful site!
         
        Gaelen

        From: "bluecat@..." <bluecat@...>
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 9:15 AM
        Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Digest Number 3705

         
        Advice on identifying one arrows was asked for politely, and was politely given.

        I stand by what I have said- Cresting is period. The banding patterns were in fact registered as I have said.

        As you have asked, I now politely offer a resource. The Worshipful Company of Fletchers in England dates to
        1371. I suggest you read here:

        http://www.fletchers.org.uk/historyarrowmaking.html

        Arrows continue to be banded to this day as a means of marking them. Specialized tape is sold commercially for
        that purpose unless it is done by hand.

        Enjoy!

        Dirk Edward of Frisia

        Banding ( cresting) of arrows has been done in the SCA a long time

        On 9/7/2011 7:46 AM, SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com wrote:
        >
        >
        > Posted by: "The Greys" cogworks@...
        > <mailto:cogworks@...?Subject=%20Re%3A%20Pennsic%20Archery%20Help> houseofgrey
        > <http://profiles.yahoo.com/houseofgrey>
        >
        >
        > Tue Sep 6, 2011 5:36 am (PDT)
        >
        >
        >
        > Dirk Edward,
        > First let me say I am NOT a documentation fanatic! Having said that, my reading said that arrows were not
        > crested in period. During war it made little difference whose arrow made the kill, just that it made a kill.
        > For hunting it was often not the Lord's shaft that took the game but one of his beaters. They marked their
        > shafts with their mark so that the one deemed the kill shot got the largest piece of the game (this from
        > Gaston Phoebus' hunting book). I have also seen actual period arrows and bolts in the armor museum in Vienna
        > Austria and do not recall seeing cresting on the shafts. If you have any documentation for cresting I would
        > be most interested in it.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > cog


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