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Re: Pennsic Archery Help

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  • bluecat@neo.rr.com
    Cresting your arrows- as in painting colored bands on the shafts to identify your arrows, is a period method of identifying your arrows from those of others.
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 5, 2011
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      Cresting your arrows- as in painting colored bands on the shafts to identify your arrows, is a period method
      of identifying your arrows from those of others.

      Creative fletching selection is also a choice.

      Choosing a specific color of nock and using only that color on your arrows will also allow them to be distinctive.

      Dirk Edward of Frisia
    • kburgess1@comcast.net
      or you could go the other way, clear coat finish on the shafts - no cresting - and a single color for the fletchings ... From: bluecat@neo.rr.com To:
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 5, 2011
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        or you could go the other way, clear coat finish on the shafts - no cresting - and a single color for the fletchings


        From: bluecat@...
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, September 5, 2011 9:18:44 AM
        Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Pennsic Archery Help

         

        Cresting your arrows- as in painting colored bands on the shafts to identify your arrows, is a period method
        of identifying your arrows from those of others.

        Creative fletching selection is also a choice.

        Choosing a specific color of nock and using only that color on your arrows will also allow them to be distinctive.

        Dirk Edward of Frisia

      • The Greys
        Dirk Edward, First let me say I am NOT a documentation fanatic! Having said that, my reading said that arrows were not crested in period. During war it made
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 6, 2011
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          Dirk Edward,
          First let me say I am NOT a documentation fanatic! Having said that, my reading said that arrows were not crested in period. During war it made little difference whose arrow made the kill, just that it made a kill. For hunting it was often not the Lord's shaft that took the game but one of his beaters. They marked their shafts with their mark so that the one deemed the kill shot got the largest piece of the game (this from Gaston Phoebus' hunting book). I have also seen actual period arrows and bolts in the armor museum in Vienna Austria and do not recall seeing cresting on the shafts. If you have any documentation for cresting I would be most interested in it.

          Thanks,
          cog

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "bluecat@..." <bluecat@...> wrote:
          >
          > Cresting your arrows- as in painting colored bands on the shafts to identify your arrows, is a period method
          > of identifying your arrows from those of others.
          >
          > Creative fletching selection is also a choice.
          >
          > Choosing a specific color of nock and using only that color on your arrows will also allow them to be distinctive.
          >
          > Dirk Edward of Frisia
          >
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