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Re: A Center Shot Stone Bow?

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  • logantheboweyder
    The stone crossbow a common bow, and you can read a blurb about it here: http://www.thebeckoning.com/medieval/stonebow/about-sbow.html Nice images of a period
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 8, 2011
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      The stone crossbow a common bow, and you can read a blurb about it here: http://www.thebeckoning.com/medieval/stonebow/about-sbow.html

      Nice images of a period stone crossbow are here:
      http://www.adrax.com/watsons/stonebow.htm

      In the Twelfth Night, Act 2, Scene 5, Shakespeare even mentions one as an appropriate tool for putting out someone's eye.

      I've seen references to hand-stonebows, and seen a copy of your illumination tidbit before. I know of no one modern who makes one, nor has attempted to make one, and I suspect they would be very hazardous to shoot.

      Generally they were used to hunt birds, and it is believed that the preferred ammunition was clay balls, rather than stones, for accuracy purposes.

      Logan

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Dearg Ailfredsson <thefenixhuntsman@...> wrote:
      >
      > The bow shown is a 'Center Shot Stone Bow' from a painting dated about 1440 AD.
      >
      > It
      > is interesting to note the split bowstring shown, as this type of
      > bowstring/cable set-up has recently been used on the modern Compound
      > Bows to do away with using the usual cable guard set-up.Does anyone have anymore info on this bow?
      > This is all I could find.
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      > Dearg.
      > >>------>
      >
      >
      > Lord Úlfr Rauðskeggr (Dearg) AOA CSO
      > (Yule-fur Rowth-skegg-er) "Wolf Red beard"
      > 11th century Gall Gaidhel [gall guy-yell]
      > a.k.a. "Irish Northman"
      > Leather Craftsman, Archer, Huntsman and Target Archery M.I.T.
      > The Barony of Fenix
      > Paid SCA member since 2003
      >
      >
      > When you stop challenging yourself, that's as good as you'll ever be.
      >
    • Sam Wise
      I recently got a bow at an antique store that has some markings on the back. The markings are: AO (possibly 0?) 68 35 28 H 10 1 The mark beside the 28 is
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 8, 2011
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        I recently got a bow at an antique store that has some markings on the
        back. The markings are:

        AO (possibly 0?)
        68
        35
        28'
        H

        10
        1

        The mark beside the 28 is about 3/4 the height of the 28 and super-scripted.

        Does anyone have any clue what they might mean?
        The 68 is, most likely, the overall length of the bow.
        The rest of the numbers I don't know.
        Samuel
      • Bill Tait
        AMO 68 (length of the bow, per Archery Manufacturers Organization) 35# @ 28 draw length H - unsure. Other markings are often serial or model numbers. William
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 8, 2011
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          AMO 68" (length of the bow, per Archery Manufacturers Organization)
          35# @ 28" draw length
          H - unsure.

          Other markings are often serial or model numbers.

          William

          On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 10:43 AM, Sam Wise <sam-wise1@...> wrote:
           


          I recently got a bow at an antique store that has some markings on the
          back. The markings are:

          AO (possibly 0?)
          68
          35
          28'
          H

          10
          1

          The mark beside the 28 is about 3/4 the height of the 28 and super-scripted.

          Does anyone have any clue what they might mean?
          The 68 is, most likely, the overall length of the bow.
          The rest of the numbers I don't know.
          Samuel


        • Sam Wise
          Thank you. Samuel
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 8, 2011
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            Thank you.
            Samuel


            On 8/8/11 2:34 PM, Bill Tait wrote:
            >
            >
            > AMO 68" (length of the bow, per Archery Manufacturers Organization)
            > 35# @ 28" draw length
            > H - unsure.
            >
            > Other markings are often serial or model numbers.
            >
            > William
            >
            > On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 10:43 AM, Sam Wise <sam-wise1@...
            > <mailto:sam-wise1@...>> wrote:
            >
            > __
            >
            >
            > I recently got a bow at an antique store that has some markings on the
            > back. The markings are:
            >
            > AO (possibly 0?)
            > 68
            > 35
            > 28'
            > H
            >
            > 10
            > 1
            >
            > The mark beside the 28 is about 3/4 the height of the 28 and
            > super-scripted.
            >
            > Does anyone have any clue what they might mean?
            > The 68 is, most likely, the overall length of the bow.
            > The rest of the numbers I don't know.
            > Samuel
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • alchem@en.com
            I considered making one.  The plan was to make a take down longbow with two different handles and strings, one set for arrows and one for pellets.  I even
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 14, 2011
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              I considered making one.  The plan was to make a take down longbow with two different handles and strings, one set for arrows and one for pellets.  I even considered a removable rest for the stone bow to allow it to shoot arrows.  Then I got busy making blowguns.  In Europe during the Middle Ages blowguns were used to shoot pellets in addition to darts like large caliber pea shoorters.  
              >
              Jim Koch "Gladius The Alchemist"
              >
              >
              > The stone crossbow a common bow, and you can read a blurb about it here:
              > http://www.thebeckoning.com/medieval/stonebow/about-sbow.html
              >

              > Nice images of a period stone crossbow are here:
              >
              http://www.adrax.com/watsons/stonebow.htm
              >
              > In the Twelfth Night, Act 2, Scene 5, Shakespeare even mentions one as an
              > appropriate tool for putting out someone's eye.
              >
              > I've seen references to hand-stonebows, and seen a copy of your
              > illumination tidbit before. I know of no one modern who makes one, nor
              > has attempted to make one, and I suspect they would be very hazardous to
              > shoot.
              >
              > Generally they were used to hunt birds, and it is believed that the
              > preferred ammunition was clay balls, rather than stones, for accuracy
              > purposes.
              >
              > Logan
              >
              > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Dearg Ailfredsson
              > <thefenixhuntsman@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> The bow shown is a 'Center Shot Stone Bow' from a painting dated about
              >> 1440 AD.
              >>
              >> It
              >> is interesting to note the split bowstring shown, as this type of
              >> bowstring/cable set-up has recently been used on the modern Compound
              >> Bows to do away with using the usual cable guard set-up.Does anyone have
              >> anymore info on this bow?
              >> This is all I could find.
              >>
              >>
              >>  
              >>
              >> Dearg.
              >>
              >>------>
              >>
              >>
              >> Lord
              Úlfr Rauðskeggr (Dearg) AOA CSO
              >> (Yule-fur Rowth-skegg-er) "Wolf Red beard"
              >> 11th century Gall Gaidhel [gall guy-yell]
              >> a.k.a. "Irish Northman"
              >> Leather Craftsman, Archer, Huntsman and Target Archery M.I.T.
              >> The Barony of Fenix
              >> Paid SCA member since 2003
              >>
              >>
              >> When you stop challenging yourself, that's as good as you'll ever be.
              >>
              >
              >
              >
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