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Re: Newbie breast trouble?

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  • i_griffen
    I agreee with the statements below except, when you draw the bow place the string an the side of your breast. draw to an anchor point about the middle of your
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 26, 2011
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      I agreee with the statements below except, when you draw the bow place the string an the side of your breast. draw to an anchor point about the middle of your jaw. I have seen my wife shoot across her breast until the day she caught herself 7 straight shots though the nipple. She was black and blue for many days.

      Your stance should be natural (as if your are standing reading a book or cooking). From the hips down relaxed and natural. Your back and shoulders should be square and relaxed. YOur drawing arm across the shoulders though the bow arm should be straight. In other words your body should be forming the "T". No I have seen some women that will either open or close their stance so that they don't catch their breast.


      I hope this helps

      Iain Griffen



      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, kburgess1@... wrote:
      >
      > are you trying to draw to your ear ? if so you will encounter problems...
      > if you are using a different anchor point, try this.
      > basic stance and foot placement, hand, elbow, shoulders in line straight on with the target,
      > draw the bow ensuring that the string is in front of your breast and see how much draw you can achieve, you should be able to reach an anchor point somewhere between the point of your chin to mid jaw. that will be plenty of draw.
      >
      > you mentioned that you cant "keep up" ?? speed ? range ? accuracy ?
      >
      > bran
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Martina" <lilly_anne@...>
      > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2011 9:19:50 AM
      > Subject: [SCA-Archery] Newbie breast trouble?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I just started practising with a group and I have a problem that I can't draw the bow-string far enough because my anatomy gets in the way. I've asked more experienced people but they couldn't think of anything and just suggested a shorter bow despite guys of a similar height have no problems with the one in question. For the record, I fell in love with an English longbow, probably 2" taller than I am. I love the power. But I can't draw it as far as I need even though my arms would allow it - so frustrating. With bows short enough as not to get in the way I can't keep up with others unless it's a recurved riding bow and I can't say I like how it behaves, seems pretty unpredictable. Besides, I'm not riding.
      >
      > I wear a 32GG (uk sizing) bra, that should be about an J in US. My breasts are spaced a little apart. I assume my stance may not be completely correct as I'm just starting up. I draw from my bellydance experience as to posture - pull up off the waist, tuck pelvis in and keep abdominals activated, don't lock knees - on that I add leg position and other things I've been told. I feel I get most power from all muscles involved and use the width of my "manly" shoulders this way as opposed when trying to collapse my chest in.
      >
      > I've heard so many times that breasts are not an obstacle with archery. So, what is wrong?
      >
    • kburgess1@comcast.net
      oops..... clumsy wording on my part .... perhaps leading edge as presented to the bow ??? ... From: i_griffen To:
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 26, 2011
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        oops..... clumsy wording on my part .... perhaps leading edge as presented to the bow ???


        From: "i_griffen" <i_griffen@...>
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2011 7:01:42 PM
        Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Newbie breast trouble?

         


        I agreee with the statements below except, when you draw the bow place the string an the side of your breast. draw to an anchor point about the middle of your jaw. I have seen my wife shoot across her breast until the day she caught herself 7 straight shots though the nipple. She was black and blue for many days.

        Your stance should be natural (as if your are standing reading a book or cooking). From the hips down relaxed and natural. Your back and shoulders should be square and relaxed. YOur drawing arm across the shoulders though the bow arm should be straight. In other words your body should be forming the "T". No I have seen some women that will either open or close their stance so that they don't catch their breast.

        I hope this helps

        Iain Griffen

        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, kburgess1@... wrote:
        >
        > are you trying to draw to your ear ? if so you will encounter problems...
        > if you are using a different anchor point, try this.
        > basic stance and foot placement, hand, elbow, shoulders in line straight on with the target,
        > draw the bow ensuring that the string is in front of your breast and see how much draw you can achieve, you should be able to reach an anchor point somewhere between the point of your chin to mid jaw. that will be plenty of draw.
        >
        > you mentioned that you cant "keep up" ?? speed ? range ? accuracy ?
        >
        > bran
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Martina" <lilly_anne@...>
        > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2011 9:19:50 AM
        > Subject: [SCA-Archery] Newbie breast trouble?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I just started practising with a group and I have a problem that I can't draw the bow-string far enough because my anatomy gets in the way. I've asked more experienced people but they couldn't think of anything and just suggested a shorter bow despite guys of a similar height have no problems with the one in question. For the record, I fell in love with an English longbow, probably 2" taller than I am. I love the power. But I can't draw it as far as I need even though my arms would allow it - so frustrating. With bows short enough as not to get in the way I can't keep up with others unless it's a recurved riding bow and I can't say I like how it behaves, seems pretty unpredictable. Besides, I'm not riding.
        >
        > I wear a 32GG (uk sizing) bra, that should be about an J in US. My breasts are spaced a little apart. I assume my stance may not be completely correct as I'm just starting up. I draw from my bellydance experience as to posture - pull up off the waist, tuck pelvis in and keep abdominals activated, don't lock knees - on that I add leg position and other things I've been told. I feel I get most power from all muscles involved and use the width of my "manly" shoulders this way as opposed when trying to collapse my chest in.
        >
        > I've heard so many times that breasts are not an obstacle with archery. So, what is wrong?
        >

      • loreleiElkins@aol.com
        Yep, good advice on stance below. You should not be pulling the string in front of your breast but to the side of it. From one well endowed women to
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 27, 2011
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          Yep, good advice on stance below.  You should not be pulling the string in front of your breast but to the side of it.  From one well endowed women to another....your boobs should never get in the way.


          Lorelei

          You need a piece of equipment call a breast protector. This can be heavy nylon mesh in a modern one, or leather in a more period appearing one.  The breast protector will allow the breast to compress somewhat. It also provides a surface to that the string will not snag on release.

          I knew one well endowed lady of the CSULB archery team that pulled the string of the bow deeply into the breast at full draw. Using a breast protector she competed at the Varsity collegiate level.

          As for which mussels to use.  You should feel the squeeze between your shoulder blades if you are drawing correctly.  With your build I recommend a "closed stance" That is you should face the target completely completely sidwise. You shoulders in line with your hips and at full draw you should have a straight line from your bow hand to the elbow of your string hand arm. Another way yo say this is  heals, hips and shoulders all lined up and 90 degrees to the shooting line.

          I hope that helps.

          Njall




          -----Original Message-----
          From: Scott B. Jaqua <hagerson@...>
          To: SCA-Archery <SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sun, Jun 26, 2011 9:04 am
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Newbie breast trouble?



          You need a piece of equipment call a breast protector. This can be heavy nylon mesh in a modern one, or leather in a more period appearing one.  The breast protector will allow the breast to compress somewhat. It also provides a surface to that the string will not snag on release.

          I knew one well endowed lady of the CSULB archery team that pulled the string of the bow deeply into the breast at full draw. Using a breast protector she competed at the Varsity collegiate level.

          As for which mussels to use.  You should feel the squeeze between your shoulder blades if you are drawing correctly.  With your build I recommend a "closed stance" That is you should face the target completely completely sidwise. You shoulders in line with your hips and at full draw you should have a straight line from your bow hand to the elbow of your string hand arm. Another way yo say this is  heals, hips and shoulders all lined up and 90 degrees to the shooting line.

          I hope that helps.

          Njall


          On 6/26/2011 9:19 AM, Martina wrote:
           
          I just started practising with a group and I have a problem that I can't draw the bow-string far enough because my anatomy gets in the way. I've asked more experienced people but they couldn't think of anything and just suggested a shorter bow despite guys of a similar height have no problems with the one in question. For the record, I fell in love with an English longbow, probably 2" taller than I am. I love the power. But I can't draw it as far as I need even though my arms would allow it - so frustrating. With bows short enough as not to get in the way I can't keep up with others unless it's a recurved riding bow and I can't say I like how it behaves, seems pretty unpredictable. Besides, I'm not riding.

          I wear a 32GG (uk sizing) bra, that should be about an J in US. My breasts are spaced a little apart. I assume my stance may not be completely correct as I'm just starting up. I draw from my bellydance experience as to posture - pull up off the waist, tuck pelvis in and keep abdominals activated, don't lock knees - on that I add leg position and other things I've been told. I feel I get most power from all muscles involved and use the width of my "manly" shoulders this way as opposed when trying to collapse my chest in.

          I've heard so many times that breasts are not an obstacle with archery. So, what is wrong?



          -- 
          Scott B. Jaqua
          Hagerson Forge
          www.hagersonforge.com
          


        • logantheboweyder
          http://www.pantagraph.com/sports/professional/article_c53b1b5e-5fb5-54cc-bd0d-a64d000ba89b.html Please look at Vic s piece of garb over his bow-arm breast. As
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 27, 2011
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            http://www.pantagraph.com/sports/professional/article_c53b1b5e-5fb5-54cc-bd0d-a64d000ba89b.html

            Please look at Vic's piece of garb over his bow-arm breast.
            As well, issues to consider are opening or closing your stance, as Njall and others comment. An open stance can have the string avoid the area completely, or a more closed stance with a draw against the bow-side of the breast (as opposed to past the breast) may work, depending a lot on where you anchor. As well, moving your anchor to below the chin may help. Janet Dykman seems to not be having a problem in this picture:

            http://www.texasarchery.org/Photos/Shootout2002/FOR/page16.htm

            Logan
            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Scott B. Jaqua" <hagerson@...> wrote:
            >
            > You need a piece of equipment call a breast protector. This can be heavy
            > nylon mesh in a modern one, or leather in a more period appearing one.
            > The breast protector will allow the breast to compress somewhat. It also
            > provides a surface to that the string will not snag on release.
            >
            > I knew one well endowed lady of the CSULB archery team that pulled the
            > string of the bow deeply into the breast at full draw. Using a breast
            > protector she competed at the Varsity collegiate level.
            >
            > As for which mussels to use. You should feel the squeeze between your
            > shoulder blades if you are drawing correctly. With your build I
            > recommend a "closed stance" That is you should face the target
            > completely completely sidwise. You shoulders in line with your hips and
            > at full draw you should have a straight line from your bow hand to the
            > elbow of your string hand arm. Another way yo say this is heals, hips
            > and shoulders all lined up and 90 degrees to the shooting line.
            >
            > I hope that helps.
            >
            > Njall
            >
            >
            > On 6/26/2011 9:19 AM, Martina wrote:
            > >
            > > I just started practising with a group and I have a problem that I
            > > can't draw the bow-string far enough because my anatomy gets in the
            > > way. I've asked more experienced people but they couldn't think of
            > > anything and just suggested a shorter bow despite guys of a similar
            > > height have no problems with the one in question. For the record, I
            > > fell in love with an English longbow, probably 2" taller than I am. I
            > > love the power. But I can't draw it as far as I need even though my
            > > arms would allow it - so frustrating. With bows short enough as not to
            > > get in the way I can't keep up with others unless it's a recurved
            > > riding bow and I can't say I like how it behaves, seems pretty
            > > unpredictable. Besides, I'm not riding.
            > >
            > > I wear a 32GG (uk sizing) bra, that should be about an J in US. My
            > > breasts are spaced a little apart. I assume my stance may not be
            > > completely correct as I'm just starting up. I draw from my bellydance
            > > experience as to posture - pull up off the waist, tuck pelvis in and
            > > keep abdominals activated, don't lock knees - on that I add leg
            > > position and other things I've been told. I feel I get most power from
            > > all muscles involved and use the width of my "manly" shoulders this
            > > way as opposed when trying to collapse my chest in.
            > >
            > > I've heard so many times that breasts are not an obstacle with
            > > archery. So, what is wrong?
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > --
            > Scott B. Jaqua
            > Hagerson Forge
            > www.hagersonforge.com
            >
          • marychance
            I ve been a E or F cup (pre weight loss) but never had the problem of catching myself in the string. However I use a more open or curved stance. Instead of
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 27, 2011
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              I've been a E or F cup (pre weight loss) but never had the problem of catching myself in the string. However I use a more open or curved stance. Instead of stright bow arm, I curve in my wrist and shoulder so the bow string comes in between my upper arm and breast, making a shallow angle between your shoulder line and bow arm at the shoulder. Also, as has been said before a really firm supportive bra makes a big difference, maybe even a minimizer bra.

              Cecelia

              --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Martina" <lilly_anne@...> wrote:
              >
              > I just started practising with a group and I have a problem that I can't draw the bow-string far enough because my anatomy gets in the way. I've asked more experienced people but they couldn't think of anything and just suggested a shorter bow despite guys of a similar height have no problems with the one in question. For the record, I fell in love with an English longbow, probably 2" taller than I am. I love the power. But I can't draw it as far as I need even though my arms would allow it - so frustrating. With bows short enough as not to get in the way I can't keep up with others unless it's a recurved riding bow and I can't say I like how it behaves, seems pretty unpredictable. Besides, I'm not riding.
              >
              > I wear a 32GG (uk sizing) bra, that should be about an J in US. My breasts are spaced a little apart. I assume my stance may not be completely correct as I'm just starting up. I draw from my bellydance experience as to posture - pull up off the waist, tuck pelvis in and keep abdominals activated, don't lock knees - on that I add leg position and other things I've been told. I feel I get most power from all muscles involved and use the width of my "manly" shoulders this way as opposed when trying to collapse my chest in.
              >
              > I've heard so many times that breasts are not an obstacle with archery. So, what is wrong?
              >
            • Magnus
              If nothing helps there always crossbow to fall back on But best of luck with the English long bow I love to see that historical early period widow maker in
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 27, 2011
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                If nothing helps there always crossbow to fall back on

                But best of luck with the English long bow I love to see that historical early period widow maker in action as they flat out distanced any other bow in history pushing out to 400 yards in medieval times however today they say 180 yards is the max to be accurate today but in king henrys (forget which one) days target could not be less then 220 yards. Of course in those Days archers started very young and was there profession

                 

                Magnus of Trimaris

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