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Crossbow string ends - ARG!

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  • Siegfried Sebastian Faust
    Ok, in the neverending saga of my crossbow (which is fun, I must say) ... my bent prod problem was fixed by the replacement of my old aluminum prod with a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 2, 2000
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      Ok, in the neverending saga of my crossbow (which is fun, I must say) ...
      my bent prod problem was fixed by the replacement of my old aluminum prod
      with a Gladius 125# one.

      Now the problem I have started to have, is that the crossbow EATS through
      the ENDS of the string. I have checked the ends of the bow and they are
      (insert your favorite cliche here - slicker than snot - smooth as a baby's
      bottom, etc).

      So it can't be due to unusual wear there ...

      So far it has taken 'perfectly good - even new' strings, and ranging from a
      day, to a few weeks, of shooting, has eaten through the end of the string
      to the point of failure, when the next shot strikes gold, and the string
      strikes the ground to my left or right (once failed on left, once on right
      - again, not a specific burr or anything)

      The end servings have been of two types - one was my own string, where the
      end was triple served by myself.

      The other was a Iolo string, where the end was 'knotted' sinew.

      Both strings when I put them on the bow were in perfect condition. And
      when examined before shooting the day they went (not taken off mind you -
      just examined on the bow), where in good condition, no wear showing.

      The only thing that I have found myself about both by looking at the OTHER
      end, is that it appears that they 'strength' of the bow was enough to push
      the serving aside and make the bare string ride on the prod. This was
      slightly noticeable on Iolo's knotted string, and VERY noticable on my own
      served string.

      Therefore, two questions.
      A) Is this definately the problem (yes, I know it is, just had to ask in
      case I have missed something)
      B) How the HECK do you serve an end loop for a 125# crossbow such that it
      won't separate when bent at the almost 90 degree angle that the gladius
      prod requires, and under the strength of said prod. my aluminum never had
      this problem.

      PLEASE help ...
      Siegfried


      ______________________________________________________________________
      Lord Siegfried Sebastian Faust Barony of Highland Foorde
      Baronial Web Minister http://highland-foorde.atlantia.sca.org
    • Susan Kell
      Hi Siegfried - Welcome to the club... 8-) Crossbows *eat* center and tip servings. You describe a very common problem, and Alan and Ailean have made good,
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 2, 2000
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        Hi Siegfried -
        Welcome to the club... 8-) Crossbows *eat* center and tip servings.
        You describe a very common problem, and Alan and Ailean have made good,
        experienced suggestions. I would add that the material used to *do* the
        serving makes a difference, as does how much wax is used in preparing the
        serving. Li has been using .020 Polygrip and has been experimenting with
        .022 Diamondback. Both work well, but the wraps of the serving must be
        done with a lot of tension in the server, as Ailean mentioned, *and* very
        close up against each other. Li doesn't wax the first layer of serving,
        and lightly waxes the second/top layer; he believes excess wax can force
        the strands apart when the string is under tension. Nylon serving
        material can work too, but it's a bit tougher to keep it tight & close
        enough. Li recommends against the larger diameter of Polygrip (.025) as
        he hasn't been able to get it to stay close together enough. Ditto all of
        the above for the center servings.
        What is the body of your string made from? We have found 30 strands (15
        circuits) of B-50 dacron or Dyneema work well on the Gladius prods, or 40
        strands (20 circuits) of Fast Flite.
        Good luck!
        -- Ygraine
      • Siegfried Sebastian Faust
        ... I ve been using 16-17 circuits (32-34 strands) of B-50 Siegfried ______________________________________________________________________ Lord Siegfried
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 3, 2000
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          >What is the body of your string made from? We have found 30 strands (15
          >circuits) of B-50 dacron or Dyneema work well on the Gladius prods, or 40
          >strands (20 circuits) of Fast Flite.

          I've been using 16-17 circuits (32-34 strands) of B-50

          Siegfried
          ______________________________________________________________________
          Lord Siegfried Sebastian Faust Barony of Highland Foorde
          Baronial Web Minister http://highland-foorde.atlantia.sca.org
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