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Re: sculpted risers and offset arrow-rests/sight-windows

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  • James W
    I have been shooting off the hand without a glove for a fair number of years now. The fletching on medieval arrows were wrapped which would prevent a lifted
    Message 1 of 60 , Feb 27 10:59 PM
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      I have been shooting off the hand without a glove for a fair number of years now. The fletching on medieval arrows were wrapped which would prevent a lifted quill in all but unusual situations. The Mary Rose arrows are wrapped solidly starting just in front of the quill. The wrapping continues down the length of the feather. This is still a pretty tight wrapping and I think the arrows show 8-10 wraps per inch before ending in a solid wrap at the base of the quill.

      If you do this with your arrows, you don't have to worry about the driving a quill into your hand. I certainly don't.

      I am not aware of anything in period that suggests the use of something to protect the bow hand. In Toxophilus, Ascham specifically mentions both the bracer and the shooting glove used for protection. The bracer for the stripe of the string and the glove to prevent the fingers from hurting. Ascham doesn't feel that protection for the bow hand is worth mentioning. In further reading in Toxophilus, Ascham talks about problems with different style of arrowheads. He talks about heads with a shoulder. The idea is that it is easier to get to the full drawlength because the archer will feel the shoulder of the head with his finger. I infer from this that archer is not wearing a glove because he needs to feel this shoulder. I also feel that the shoulder is acting as a draw length check -- sort of a medieval clicker.

      I would also debate whether a quill that did lift off and get driven into an archer's bow hand would be enough to take out an archer on the warfield. I do know of someone that this happened to. It was a joke at the time. Pictures were taken. Since this happened at a gathering of traditional and primitive archers recreating old techniques, they even tried to make glue from the blood with no success. Stick to sinew. A couple of weeks later, the good man was in the hospital and the prime suspect was something on that feather. But a couple of weeks in medieval times and probably nobody would have connected the two incidences especially with other diseases following the army.

      In Service,
      James
      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "John Fair of Hawkwode" <klooch1@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks for the info James.
      >
      > No type of rest used on the Mary Rose bows. Might be a possible reason for no period documentation on this.
      >
      > Any indications of any methods to keep from shooting off the hand in period?
      >
      > While hand damage from vane tips may be in the realm of papercuts for some, putting a lifted quill into flesh might put an archer out of action. Previously on this list some methods to avoid and minimize injury were shared.
      >
      > Proper technique should take most of the risk out of shooting off hand. I'm not so certain I could always maintain such when faced with a charging line of enemies, or a case of buck fever.
      >
      > John Fair
      >
    • James W
      I have been shooting off the hand without a glove for a fair number of years now. The fletching on medieval arrows were wrapped which would prevent a lifted
      Message 60 of 60 , Feb 27 10:59 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        I have been shooting off the hand without a glove for a fair number of years now. The fletching on medieval arrows were wrapped which would prevent a lifted quill in all but unusual situations. The Mary Rose arrows are wrapped solidly starting just in front of the quill. The wrapping continues down the length of the feather. This is still a pretty tight wrapping and I think the arrows show 8-10 wraps per inch before ending in a solid wrap at the base of the quill.

        If you do this with your arrows, you don't have to worry about the driving a quill into your hand. I certainly don't.

        I am not aware of anything in period that suggests the use of something to protect the bow hand. In Toxophilus, Ascham specifically mentions both the bracer and the shooting glove used for protection. The bracer for the stripe of the string and the glove to prevent the fingers from hurting. Ascham doesn't feel that protection for the bow hand is worth mentioning. In further reading in Toxophilus, Ascham talks about problems with different style of arrowheads. He talks about heads with a shoulder. The idea is that it is easier to get to the full drawlength because the archer will feel the shoulder of the head with his finger. I infer from this that archer is not wearing a glove because he needs to feel this shoulder. I also feel that the shoulder is acting as a draw length check -- sort of a medieval clicker.

        I would also debate whether a quill that did lift off and get driven into an archer's bow hand would be enough to take out an archer on the warfield. I do know of someone that this happened to. It was a joke at the time. Pictures were taken. Since this happened at a gathering of traditional and primitive archers recreating old techniques, they even tried to make glue from the blood with no success. Stick to sinew. A couple of weeks later, the good man was in the hospital and the prime suspect was something on that feather. But a couple of weeks in medieval times and probably nobody would have connected the two incidences especially with other diseases following the army.

        In Service,
        James
        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "John Fair of Hawkwode" <klooch1@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Thanks for the info James.
        >
        > No type of rest used on the Mary Rose bows. Might be a possible reason for no period documentation on this.
        >
        > Any indications of any methods to keep from shooting off the hand in period?
        >
        > While hand damage from vane tips may be in the realm of papercuts for some, putting a lifted quill into flesh might put an archer out of action. Previously on this list some methods to avoid and minimize injury were shared.
        >
        > Proper technique should take most of the risk out of shooting off hand. I'm not so certain I could always maintain such when faced with a charging line of enemies, or a case of buck fever.
        >
        > John Fair
        >
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