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Bow stringing

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  • Lord Alester MacClansy
    I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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      I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the cut off period? 1 hour, 1 day? Any input?

      Klancey
    • Eadric Anstapa
      No longer than is needed. I know some primitive shooters that will unstring their bow if it is going to be unused for 20 minutes or more. For modern
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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        No longer than is needed.

        I know some primitive shooters that will unstring their bow if it is
        going to be unused for 20 minutes or more. For modern composites, not
        a big a deal.

        Sort of at minimum it is best if you basically string them when you get
        to the range in the morning (then get it inspected) and then unstring
        them when you leave the range in the evening. Don't carry em around or
        store then strung as in general all that can do is cause problems.

        -EA

        On 7/19/2010 3:37 PM, Lord Alester MacClansy wrote:
        > I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the cut off period? 1 hour, 1 day? Any input?
        >
        > Klancey
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
      • Jason Yeates
        I generally unstring when I m done using it. I string it up on the range because that s actually part of our inspection process. :)
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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          I generally unstring when I'm done using it.  I string it up on the range because that's actually part of our inspection process. :)

          On Mon, Jul 19, 2010 at 5:07 PM, Eadric Anstapa <eadric@...> wrote:
           

          No longer than is needed.

          I know some primitive shooters that will unstring their bow if it is
          going to be unused for 20 minutes or more. For modern composites, not
          a big a deal.

          Sort of at minimum it is best if you basically string them when you get
          to the range in the morning (then get it inspected) and then unstring
          them when you leave the range in the evening. Don't carry em around or
          store then strung as in general all that can do is cause problems.

          -EA



          On 7/19/2010 3:37 PM, Lord Alester MacClansy wrote:
          > I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the cut off period? 1 hour, 1 day? Any input?
          >
          > Klancey
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >


        • Carolus
          Much of it depends on the type of bow. For natural materials the minimum time is best. On the other hand modern composites really don t care. I have several
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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            Much of it depends on the type of bow. For natural materials the
            minimum time is best. On the other hand modern composites really don't
            care. I have several Olympic grade bows (well they were 30 years ago)
            with hard rock maple core fiberglass limbs. When I was shooting
            competition regularly I would set the bow up the afternoon or evening
            before the first day of practice and leave it setup until the end of
            shooting which could be a week. I have even left them set up for a
            couple of months. They still shoot as new.

            In general, most SCA grade bows do well if set up just before practice
            for the day and taken down when shooting ends for the day. Keep it out
            of the sun as much as possible. Use a good UV protectant paste wax and
            wipe it down occasionally with lemon or walnut oil. Overall care is
            much more important than time strung.
            Carolus

            Lord Alester MacClansy wrote:
            > I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the cut off period? 1 hour, 1 day? Any input?
            >
            > Klancey
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >
            > No virus found in this incoming message.
            > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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            >
            >
          • Jason Yeates
            I ve heard the break-down bows are a lot more susceptible to limb twist if you leave them strung for long periods.
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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              I've heard the break-down bows are a lot more susceptible to limb twist if you leave them strung for long periods.

              On Mon, Jul 19, 2010 at 5:30 PM, Carolus <eulenhorst@...> wrote:
               

              Much of it depends on the type of bow. For natural materials the
              minimum time is best. On the other hand modern composites really don't
              care. I have several Olympic grade bows (well they were 30 years ago)
              with hard rock maple core fiberglass limbs. When I was shooting
              competition regularly I would set the bow up the afternoon or evening
              before the first day of practice and leave it setup until the end of
              shooting which could be a week. I have even left them set up for a
              couple of months. They still shoot as new.

              In general, most SCA grade bows do well if set up just before practice
              for the day and taken down when shooting ends for the day. Keep it out
              of the sun as much as possible. Use a good UV protectant paste wax and
              wipe it down occasionally with lemon or walnut oil. Overall care is
              much more important than time strung.
              Carolus



              Lord Alester MacClansy wrote:
              > I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the cut off period? 1 hour, 1 day? Any input?
              >
              > Klancey
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              >
              > ----------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              > No virus found in this incoming message.
              > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              > Version: 9.0.839 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3014 - Release Date: 07/18/10 11:35:00
              >
              >

            • logantheboweyder
              Material dependant answer. Wood bows will take on a set, and can show noticable changes in the sun after a couple of hours, in some situations. My lady bought
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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                Material dependant answer.

                Wood bows will take on a set, and can show noticable changes in the sun after a couple of hours, in some situations.

                My lady bought a fiberglass/wood composite (Wing Archery) bow that was strung up in a shop for several years, and still shoots great.

                As a general rule, all-wood bows should be unstrung if they are going to sit. I don't generally let one down between ends, unless it is in mid-summer, but I would take it down for lunch break.

                For all other bows, I would take it down at the end of the day's shooting.

                Another thing to remember is that you have a spring under tension, with a considerable amount of energy stored. If that string does get accidentally knicked and breaks, that stored energy is released quickly, and can damage things and body parts pretty easily.

                Logan

                --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Lord Alester MacClansy" <klancey1@...> wrote:
                >
                > I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the cut off period? 1 hour, 1 day? Any input?
                >
                > Klancey
                >
              • Carolus
                Mine are takedowns, both Bear and Hoyt and my lady has a Samick takedown as well. I have never seen any problems with any of these brands of takedown bows
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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                  Mine are takedowns, both Bear and Hoyt and my lady has a Samick takedown
                  as well. I have never seen any problems with any of these brands of
                  takedown bows even when strung for some time. I would be tempted to say
                  it has more to do with general care than type of bow or stringing when
                  dealing with modern composites.
                  Carolus

                  Jason Yeates wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > I've heard the break-down bows are a lot more susceptible to limb
                  > twist if you leave them strung for long periods.
                  >
                  >
                • Guy Taylor
                  This question comes up regularly in mundane traditional archery circles. As has been noted, it depends upon the bow s materials. All wood or bows made solely
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 19, 2010
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                    This question comes up regularly in mundane traditional archery circles.
                    As has been noted, it depends upon the bow's materials.
                    All wood or bows made solely of wood laminates should be unstrung when shooting has finished. Many people will unstring when breaking for lunch and re-string when shooting resumes.
                    Fiberglass laminated bows may be left strung indefinately, if they are stored properly. A number of people string their glass-lam bows at the beginning of hunting season and don't unstring them until the season is over. Some bowyers actually recommend that their bows be left strung as they feel the stringing process is the most dangerous time in a bow's life.
                    Leaving a bow strung does not promote limb twist. Improper storage and improper stringing technique both promote limb twist.
                     
                    Guy
                     

                    --- On Mon, 7/19/10, Lord Alester MacClansy <klancey1@...> wrote:

                    From: Lord Alester MacClansy <klancey1@...>
                    Subject: [SCA-Archery] Bow stringing
                    To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Monday, July 19, 2010, 1:37 PM

                     
                    I have a curious question. Is there an amount of time its bad to leave a bow strung? I know it would depend on many factors but as a rule of thumb, whats the cut off period? 1 hour, 1 day? Any input?

                    Klancey

                  • chris & sher
                    i am not positive , but i have a few older glass lam, bows , that when i acquired them were strung. and the poundage has dropped from there original . i would
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 20, 2010
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                      i am not positive , but i have a few older glass lam, bows , that when i acquired them were strung.
                      and the poundage  has dropped from there original .
                      i would think that , if a bow were always strung, the resistance would drop,  like a old spring that wont return.
                      Christopher
                       
                    • bradb@micro-link.net
                      I ve seen improperly stored mentioned a couple of times so far.... For the rookie shooters this means anywhere there may be a serious temperature fluxuation.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 20, 2010
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                        I've seen "improperly stored" mentioned a couple of times so far....

                        For the rookie shooters this means anywhere there may be a serious
                        temperature fluxuation. You don't want to store your bow in the car due to
                        the incredible difference in temperature from the sun of the day to the
                        cool of 5AM. Neither the garage, if it is not insulated or if there is a
                        significant temp fluxuation. The constant temperature differences will
                        delaminate a bow fairly quickly.

                        A bow should never be 'propped' into the corner of a room. Especially
                        while strung. This will cause the limbs to twist. Lay the bow flat
                        wherever it is at rest. On top of a book case, dresser, shelves, etc. are
                        the best places. And this may be 'strung' or 'unstrung'. Experienced
                        shooters will have their favourite bows hanging on two pegs or two hooks
                        on the wall to assure the bow is supported in a stress free environment. I
                        have actually taken two of the clothes bars which are sold (Advanced Auto)
                        for hanging shirts and suits in a vehicle and mounted them fore and aft in
                        the ceiling of the Jeep. All my bows (marshal staff, ironwood walking
                        staff, etc.) are up out of the way, protected from lateral stressing and
                        the feast gear, and not sticking us in the elbows to and from events
                        anymore. I tried rope but the rope eventually sags and everything hangs
                        really badly. Get one inch wooden dowling from a hardware store and figger
                        your own mounting in the top of your vehicle. My Red Head *loves* the
                        clothes bars.

                        Transport the bows in a 'Bow Case' which can be nothing more than a very
                        long "sock" sewn up to protect the bow from scratches and to keep the
                        string with the bow. My belt brother has a 'wooden' bow case with a hinged
                        lid which also carries his beeswax, knock pliers, fletchtite, tip glue,
                        bow square, yadda yadda. Very nice.

                        Be safe. 50 week town run is almost finished!!

                        Brad



                        > Leaving a bow strung does not promote limb twist. Improper storage and
                        > improper stringing technique both promote limb twist.
                        >  
                        > Guy
                        >  
                      • Guy Taylor
                        While I obviously cannot answer to your individual situation, bowyers have checked bows that have been strung for years at a time and have seen no drop in
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 20, 2010
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                          While I obviously cannot answer to your individual situation, bowyers have checked bows that have been strung for years at a time and have seen no drop in weight.
                           
                          Guy 

                          --- On Tue, 7/20/10, chris & sher <CTURK2@...> wrote:

                          From: chris & sher <CTURK2@...>
                          Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Bow stringing
                          To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Tuesday, July 20, 2010, 5:51 AM

                           
                          
                          i am not positive , but i have a few older glass lam, bows , that when i acquired them were strung.
                          and the poundage  has dropped from there original .
                          i would think that , if a bow were always strung, the resistance would drop,  like a old spring that wont return.
                          Christopher
                           
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