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Crossbow bolt question

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  • Tina Curtis
    I have a question about crossbow bolts. What would work better for bolts, Cedar or Spruce. Notice Spruce is cheaper in price, but what works better. Wulfwyn
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 18, 2010
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      I have a question about crossbow bolts.

      What would work better for bolts, Cedar or Spruce. Notice Spruce is cheaper in price, but what works better.

      Wulfwyn
    • Eadric Anstapa
      Neither works better than the other. it is simply a matter of preference and availability. Compare a port orford cedar shafts to a sitka spruce shaft of the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 18, 2010
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        Neither works "better" than the other. it is simply a matter of
        preference and availability.

        Compare a port orford cedar shafts to a sitka spruce shaft of the same
        weight and spine and they should perform nearly identically.

        I personally like sitka spruce shafts because I think they take abuse a
        little better than port orford cedar. The spruce is harder to
        straighten but stays straight longer. The cedar is easier to straighten
        but consequently is also easier get un-straight.

        -EA

        On 7/18/2010 4:37 PM, Tina Curtis wrote:
        > I have a question about crossbow bolts.
        >
        > What would work better for bolts, Cedar or Spruce. Notice Spruce is cheaper in price, but what works better.
        >
        > Wulfwyn
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
      • Harry Billings
        The type of realse also comes into play here. A roller nut is not a hard on the butt end of the bolt as compared to a notch lock. Which tends to slap them a
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 18, 2010
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          The type of realse also comes into play here. A roller nut is not a hard on the butt end of the bolt as compared to a notch lock. Which tends to slap them a little more. Some thing else to think about.

          plachoya
          Ansteorra



           


           
          Neither works "better" than the other. it is simply a matter of
          preference and availability.

          Compare a port orford cedar shafts to a sitka spruce shaft of the same
          weight and spine and they should perform nearly identically.

          I personally like sitka spruce shafts because I think they take abuse a
          little better than port orford cedar. The spruce is harder to
          straighten but stays straight longer. The cedar is easier to straighten
          but consequently is also easier get un-straight.

          -EA

          On 7/18/2010 4:37 PM, Tina Curtis wrote:
          > I have a question about crossbow bolts.
          >
          > What would work better for bolts, Cedar or Spruce. Notice Spruce is cheaper in price, but what works better.
          >
          > Wulfwyn
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >


        • Carolus
          I personally prefer ash or one of the heavier hardwoods. Spine is irrelevant for crossbows. Heavier bolts are more stable in flight but hit the butt harder.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 18, 2010
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            I personally prefer ash or one of the heavier hardwoods. Spine is
            irrelevant for crossbows. Heavier bolts are more stable in flight but
            hit the butt harder.
            Carolus

            Eadric Anstapa wrote:
            > Neither works "better" than the other. it is simply a matter of
            > preference and availability.
            >
            > Compare a port orford cedar shafts to a sitka spruce shaft of the same
            > weight and spine and they should perform nearly identically.
            >
            > I personally like sitka spruce shafts because I think they take abuse a
            > little better than port orford cedar. The spruce is harder to
            > straighten but stays straight longer. The cedar is easier to straighten
            > but consequently is also easier get un-straight.
            >
            > -EA
            >
            > On 7/18/2010 4:37 PM, Tina Curtis wrote:
            >
            >> I have a question about crossbow bolts.
            >>
            >> What would work better for bolts, Cedar or Spruce. Notice Spruce is cheaper in price, but what works better.
            >>
            >> Wulfwyn
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> ------------------------------------
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >
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          • bradb@micro-link.net
            And remember that we re addressing XBow bolts. They are a bit shorter than the handbow arrows which will make a difference. The XBow quarrel length of
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 18, 2010
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              And remember that we're addressing XBow bolts. They are a bit shorter than
              the handbow arrows which 'will' make a difference. The XBow quarrel length
              of roughly 14-18 inches will be much more stable than an arrow of the same
              material 28-32 inches so I agree, the apples to oranges comparrison has
              even less variation between the two than would be expected.

              Brad




              > Neither works "better" than the other. it is simply a matter of
              > preference and availability.
              >
              > Compare a port orford cedar shafts to a sitka spruce shaft of the same
              > weight and spine and they should perform nearly identically.
              >
              > I personally like sitka spruce shafts because I think they take abuse a
              > little better than port orford cedar. The spruce is harder to
              > straighten but stays straight longer. The cedar is easier to straighten
              > but consequently is also easier get un-straight.
              >
              > -EA
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