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RE: [SCA-Archery] Re: Making arrows in the woods

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  • RJ Bachner
    Greetings from southern Quebec. Locally you may find bushy plants like red osier growing all about your area or something like it. It works great as a self
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 2, 2010
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      Greetings from southern Quebec.

      Locally you may find bushy plants like red osier" growing all about your
      area or something like it. It works great as a self arrow but it is a lot of
      work getting it ready. There is also all the options already listed as well
      as white ash saplings, raspberry and many others. (don't use Staghorn Sumac
      no matter how straight it seems, bad idea trust me.)

      If you have access to a table saw then the possibilities become many.
      Depending on your draw weight good white pine, many spruces, BC Fir or sitka
      spruce can be had at your local Cabinet makers lumberyard.

      What you are looking for is grain that runs straight down the shaft with as
      little run off as possible. You want clean grain, no knots, pins or twists.

      The grain lines in softwood should be fine and many. The more rings per inch
      the denser and therefore stiffer the wood is likely to be, though there
      might be some exceptions. (for hardwood the exact opposite is normally true)

      Be prepared to make a sh*t load of shafts to get many matching shafts.

      For more help, email me directly I would love to chip in or look up
      Paleoplanet on google. Great help they will be.


      Ragi

      -----Original Message-----
      From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of frode_kettilsson
      Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2010 9:25 PM
      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Making arrows in the woods

      If it please My Lord, I can recommend none better than "The Traditional
      Bowyers Bible" series of books, which cover all aspects of the bowyers art.
      Though I have it not to hand, I believe one of the first two volumes covers
      self made arrows in some detail. Ash, Port Orford cedar, and Sitka spruce
      are all reputed to make fine arrow shafts, as is cane, and wild rose. As I
      am able, I will present to you more information.
      In Service,
      Frode Kettilsson

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, G P <gonfannon@...> wrote:
      >
      > No way I can make that. I'm in southern Ontario, Canada, and I don't get
      to
      > as many events as I'd like, even locally.
      >
      > What kind of woods would people recommend? Like, rather than naming
      specific
      > woods which may not grow near me, what properties of woods are desired in
      > arrow shafts, so that I can then look for local woods to suit?
      >
      >
      > Geirr
      >
      >
      > On Tue, Mar 2, 2010 at 5:47 PM, Ld. Cian Rhys Gravenor <
      > metaldog00@...> wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > Greeting,
      > >
      > > If you can make it to Lilies War this year, I think they are having a
      class
      > > on making your own arrows from wood that has been harvested. This is, of
      > > course, if I remember correctly and they haven't changed their minds on
      the
      > > matter. I attended their bow making class last year and it was a very
      > > informative course. It was very hands-on and I learned quite a bit.
      > >
      > > Ld. Cian
      > >
      > > ------------------------------
      > > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: gonfannon@...
      > > Date: Tue, 2 Mar 2010 14:00:23 -0500
      > > Subject: [SCA-Archery] Making arrows in the woods
      > >
      > >
      > > Greetings unto the list.
      > >
      > > I'm looking to speak to some people who make their own arrows from
      > > wood they harvest themselves from trees, rather than working with
      > > pre-cut wood. I would like to start doing this myself, and have
      > > questions.
      > >
      > > We could discuss it here, or you could write to me offlist. Either is
      > > fine by me.
      > >
      > > Geirr
      > > gonfannon@...
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------
      > > Your E-mail and More On-the-Go. Get Windows Live Hotmail Free. Sign up
      > > now. <http://clk.atdmt.com/GBL/go/201469229/direct/01/>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >




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    • Carolus
      Splitting works better than sawing for shafts. A split will follow the grain and give a more consistent shaft. Sawing can cut the grain at an angle which may
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 2, 2010
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        Splitting works better than sawing for shafts. A split will follow the
        grain and give a more consistent shaft. Sawing can cut the grain at an
        angle which may leave a weak point in the shaft allowing it to break on
        release producing a sharp and jagged end which can cause serious injury.
        Carolus

        RJ Bachner wrote:
        > Greetings from southern Quebec.
        >
        > Locally you may find bushy plants like red osier" growing all about your
        > area or something like it. It works great as a self arrow but it is a lot of
        > work getting it ready. There is also all the options already listed as well
        > as white ash saplings, raspberry and many others. (don't use Staghorn Sumac
        > no matter how straight it seems, bad idea trust me.)
        >
        > If you have access to a table saw then the possibilities become many.
        > Depending on your draw weight good white pine, many spruces, BC Fir or sitka
        > spruce can be had at your local Cabinet makers lumberyard.
        >
        > What you are looking for is grain that runs straight down the shaft with as
        > little run off as possible. You want clean grain, no knots, pins or twists.
        >
        > The grain lines in softwood should be fine and many. The more rings per inch
        > the denser and therefore stiffer the wood is likely to be, though there
        > might be some exceptions. (for hardwood the exact opposite is normally true)
        >
        > Be prepared to make a sh*t load of shafts to get many matching shafts.
        >
        > For more help, email me directly I would love to chip in or look up
        > Paleoplanet on google. Great help they will be.
        >
        >
        > Ragi
        >
        >
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