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Re: Teaching a 5 year old

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  • Luigi Kapaj
    ... Feather cuts can be prevented by properly trimming down the feathers. Take a knife and slide it into one of the first few barbs near the front and cut in
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 30, 2009
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      > I shoot with a glove on my left hand to prevent
      > feather cuts.

      Feather cuts can be prevented by properly trimming down the feathers. Take a knife and slide it into one of the first few barbs near the front and cut in along the barb down to the shaft making the leading point of the feather as sharp and, most importantly, as smooth to the shaft as possible. Then put a generous drop of white glue over the point. I shoot off the hand and this solved all feather cut issues for me.

      For teaching a 5 year old, here are a few observations as to how the archers in Mongolia teach their children. First they take it very seriously, including full garb and learning the proper technique they want them to use as an adult - thumb draw, and at times alongside professional archers for inspiration though mostly with other kids or alone. For distance, Mongolians place the target 3 meters away per year of age for girls and 4 meters per year of age for boys. Mongolians count age in natural numbers so your 5 year old is 6 by Mongolian reckoning so he should be practicing at a target 24 meters away.


      Puppy
      http://Yasa.NYCMongol.com
    • Sheri Rees
      Simon, The biggest thing that will help your great-grandson is practice. Verbal instructions can and do work with this age when combined with lots of practice
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 1 9:57 AM
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        Simon,
        The biggest thing that will help your great-grandson is
        practice. Verbal instructions can and do work with this age when
        combined with lots of practice and reassurance. As well as his being
        able to watch you and others shooting properly.

        My son is now 5 and a half, he's been shooting without my direct help
        for almost 2 years. He shoots with us every week during Baronial
        practice (which is in our yard) and whenever else he asks to. He's
        also competed in one Shire Champions shoot 2 years in a row (later
        this month will be the third time). He's competed mostly because I
        was there to shoot and he wanted to when I did (more fun than the
        babysitter).

        Give yourselves the time to work with this, you can't rush it.
        Also find some fun targets to shoot at - keep this a game for him.

        Shadhra, AnTir
        (who works at a preschool many months a year)



        At 09:41 AM 6/30/2009, you wrote:
        >I'm beginning to teach my five year old great-grandson. We have a
        >very light yew longbow. He's getting the idea but has difficulty
        >keeping the arrow is position until release. So far I have found
        >(since verbal instruction doesn't seem to work with this age) that
        >the back of my gloved hand seems to be the best solution.
        >
        >Any other suggestions?
        >
        >Thanks,
        >
        >Simon Sinneghe
        >Briaroak, Summits, An Tir
      • Lord Richard Woodenbridge
        Greetings all, I thought that this discussion was related to a video I posted on youtube today. Its my son age 6 as of March at practicing shooting. I jsut
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 4 3:37 PM
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          Greetings all,
          I thought that this discussion was related to a video I posted on youtube today. Its my son age 6 as of March at practicing shooting.
          I jsut thought those of you who commented might like to see this:

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQ1wPKoWsKo

          Richard Woodenbridge
        • Hank Steinfeld
          In general, his form looks very good especially for someone that young.  I hesitate to make suggestions but I will add that if you look at his feet, you will
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 5 5:20 AM
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            In general, his form looks very good especially for someone that young.  I hesitate to make suggestions but I will add that if you look at his feet, you will see an opportunity to increase draw and improve form even more.  Have him stand with his rear (right foot) slightly behind a line drawn from the tips of his toes to the target. (the purpendicular to the shooting line).  This will allow him to get a better draw and will make shooting even easier.  Looks like he was having a good time and that is as important.
             
            In Service
            Khadir






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