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Period Bow

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  • cuvien1438
    Greetings, I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating to 14th century France , and archery? My personae is occitan, which is a
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 10, 2009
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      Greetings,

      I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
      to 14th century 'France', and archery?

      My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
      central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
      bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.

      Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
      and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
      I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
      need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
      like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.

      Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
      materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
      should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
      competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?

      Thank You,

      Cuvien
    • James Koch
      Cuvien, ... Where do you live? Once we know that we can refer you to a local fletcher. For SCA shooting you need special arrows. That is to say you need
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 11, 2009
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        Cuvien,
        >
        Where do you live? Once we know that we can refer you to a local
        fletcher. For SCA shooting you need special arrows. That is to say
        you need natural shafts and fletching. For a modern recurve you will
        want to use wood shafts and feather fletch. What is the draw weight
        of your bow? It is written on the side or one of the limbs and looks
        like this 35# @ 28". Your best bet is to obtain arrows matched for
        both you and for the bow. This will depend on your draw
        length. There is a special stick for measuring this and your local
        fletcher likely has one. The shafts can then be cut to your length
        and the stiffness of the spine of the arrows matched to the draw
        weight of your bow. This is not such a big deal with a
        recurve. Then points of the appropriate weight can be attached. For
        medieval France you probably want to use a long flatbow.
        >
        Jim Koch "Gladius The Alchemist"
        >
        >
        >At 02:04 AM 1/11/2009, you wrote:

        >Greetings,
        >
        >I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
        >to 14th century 'France', and archery?
        >
        >My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
        >central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
        >bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.
        >
        >Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
        >and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
        >I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
        >need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
        >like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.
        >
        >Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
        >materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
        >should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
        >competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?
        >
        >Thank You,
        >
        >Cuvien
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jameswolfden
        Your French Archer circa 14th Century would be using either a crossbow or an English Longbow ideally made of yew. But get comfortable with your recurve before
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 11, 2009
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          Your French Archer circa 14th Century would be using either a
          crossbow or an English Longbow ideally made of yew.

          But get comfortable with your recurve before considering
          adding/switching to a period longbow or period crossbow.

          In Service,
          James Wolfden

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "cuvien1438" <cuvien1438@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Greetings,
          >
          > I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information
          relating
          > to 14th century 'France', and archery?
          >
          > My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is
          now
          > central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind
          of
          > bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been
          made of.
          >
          > Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an
          acquaintance
          > and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery
          practice but
          > I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or
          do I
          > need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and
          I
          > like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.
          >
          > Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
          > materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
          > should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
          > competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?
          >
          > Thank You,
          >
          > Cuvien
          >
        • Michael Grossberg
          ... The French were not particularly noted for the use of the bow. Being the weapon of a peasant, it was beneath the dignity of a French knight to use, and
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 11, 2009
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            -----Original Message-----
            >From: cuvien1438 <cuvien1438@...>
            >Sent: Jan 11, 2009 2:04 AM
            >To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Period Bow
            >
            >Greetings,
            >
            >I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
            >to 14th century 'France', and archery?
            >
            >My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
            >central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
            >bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.
            >
            >Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
            >and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
            >I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
            >need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
            >like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.
            >
            >Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
            >materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
            >should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
            >competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?
            >
            >Thank You,
            >
            >Cuvien

            The French were not particularly noted for the use of the bow. Being the weapon of a peasant, it was beneath the dignity of a French knight to use, and they didn't much like the idea of having their serfs armed with a weapon that could kill a knight from a distance(or kill one at all; after all, peasants were there to BE killed, not kill their betters!). If the French decided that they needed long-distance weapons, they generally hired mercenary crossbowmen(who they then looked down on with contempt, and often rode down when the crossbowmen wouldn't get out of the knights' way fast enough to suit them).

            Arrows for SCA use must be made of wood, with feather fletching. Good luck finding these in the average sporting goods store. There are several arrow makers (called "fletchers") in the Society, who can do all kinds of custom work for you.
            If you want to make your own(which, for basic arrows, isn't hard at all) all the tools and supplies you'll need can be gotten from 3 Rivers Archery, KustomKing Archery, and several other suppliers. I reccommend a magazine called "Primitive Archer", which has lots of informaive articles, and tons of ads for primitive supplies dealers.
            Hope this helps some.

            Gardr Gunnarsson
            Barony of Settmour Swamp
            >
          • Michael Grossberg
            ... The French were not particularly noted for the use of the bow. Being the weapon of a peasant, it was beneath the dignity of a French knight to use, and
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 11, 2009
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              -----Original Message-----
              >From: cuvien1438 <cuvien1438@...>
              >Sent: Jan 11, 2009 2:04 AM
              >To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Period Bow
              >
              >Greetings,
              >
              >I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
              >to 14th century 'France', and archery?
              >
              >My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
              >central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
              >bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.
              >
              >Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
              >and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
              >I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
              >need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
              >like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.
              >
              >Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
              >materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
              >should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
              >competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?
              >
              >Thank You,
              >
              >Cuvien

              The French were not particularly noted for the use of the bow. Being the weapon of a peasant, it was beneath the dignity of a French knight to use, and they didn't much like the idea of having their serfs armed with a weapon that could kill a knight from a distance(or kill one at all; after all, peasants were there to BE killed, not kill their betters!). If the French decided that they needed long-distance weapons, they generally hired mercenary crossbowmen(who they then looked down on with contempt, and often rode down when the crossbowmen wouldn't get out of the knights' way fast enough to suit them).

              Arrows for SCA use must be made of wood, with feather fletching. Good luck finding these in the average sporting goods store. There are several arrow makers (called "fletchers") in the Society, who can do all kinds of custom work for you.
              If you want to make your own(which, for basic arrows, isn't hard at all) all the tools and supplies you'll need can be gotten from 3 Rivers Archery, KustomKing Archery, and several other suppliers. I reccommend a magazine called "Primitive Archer", which has lots of informative articles, and tons of ads for primitive supplies dealers.
              Hope this helps some.

              Gardr Gunnarsson
              Barony of Settmour Swamp
              >
            • J. Hughes
              Actually, there was a very strong tradition of archery in France, in Gascony. This is an area known for the use of the Occitan dialect. When the English lost
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 11, 2009
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                Actually, there was a very strong tradition of archery in France, in Gascony. This is an area known for the use of the Occitan dialect. When the English lost that part of France to the French king, the French monarchs particularly valued this capability. By the early 16th century the Kings of France had revived the practice of Philip Augustus (12th century) to have a mounted personal guard of crossbowmen. Bottom line: we do know what bow an occitan person would have used, a crossbow.

                Charles O'Connor




                ________________________________
                From: Michael Grossberg <geejayem@...>
                To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2009 2:20:51 PM
                Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Period Bow




                -----Original Message-----
                >From: cuvien1438 <cuvien1438@yahoo. com>
                >Sent: Jan 11, 2009 2:04 AM
                >To: SCA-Archery@ yahoogroups. com
                >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Period Bow
                >
                >Greetings,
                >
                >I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
                >to 14th century 'France', and archery?
                >
                >My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
                >central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
                >bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.
                >
                >Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
                >and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
                >I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
                >need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
                >like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.
                >
                >Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
                >materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
                >should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
                >competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?
                >
                >Thank You,
                >
                >Cuvien

                The French were not particularly noted for the use of the bow. Being the weapon of a peasant, it was beneath the dignity of a French knight to use, and they didn't much like the idea of having their serfs armed with a weapon that could kill a knight from a distance(or kill one at all; after all, peasants were there to BE killed, not kill their betters!). If the French decided that they needed long-distance weapons, they generally hired mercenary crossbowmen( who they then looked down on with contempt, and often rode down when the crossbowmen wouldn't get out of the knights' way fast enough to suit them).

                Arrows for SCA use must be made of wood, with feather fletching. Good luck finding these in the average sporting goods store. There are several arrow makers (called "fletchers") in the Society, who can do all kinds of custom work for you.
                If you want to make your own(which, for basic arrows, isn't hard at all) all the tools and supplies you'll need can be gotten from 3 Rivers Archery, KustomKing Archery, and several other suppliers. I reccommend a magazine called "Primitive Archer", which has lots of informative articles, and tons of ads for primitive supplies dealers.
                Hope this helps some.

                Gardr Gunnarsson
                Barony of Settmour Swamp
                >






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Steven Fuller
                What is the draw weight of your bow, and how long is your draw? These two tidbits are used to make arrows that are right for you and your bow. --Rhys Cantor.
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 11, 2009
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                  What is the draw weight of your bow, and how long is your draw? These two tidbits are
                  used to make arrows that are right for you and your bow.

                  --Rhys Cantor.
                  Brother of the Great Dark Horde

                  --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "cuvien1438" <cuvien1438@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Greetings,
                  >
                  > I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
                  > to 14th century 'France', and archery?
                  >
                  > My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
                  > central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
                  > bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.
                  >
                  > Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
                  > and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
                  > I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
                  > need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
                  > like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.
                  >
                  > Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
                  > materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
                  > should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
                  > competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?
                  >
                  > Thank You,
                  >
                  > Cuvien
                  >
                • Terrance Timmons
                  Actually, there was a royal proclomation in 13/14th century for french nobles that if they couldnt afford knightly armour, then they must have and be
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 12, 2009
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                    Actually, there was a royal proclomation in 13/14th century for french nobles that if they couldnt afford "knightly" armour, then they must have and be profecient with a bow. it is on the sca_4peerage group files section.

                    YIS

                    Terrance
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Michael Grossberg
                    To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2009 12:20 PM
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Period Bow




                    -----Original Message-----
                    >From: cuvien1438 <cuvien1438@...>
                    >Sent: Jan 11, 2009 2:04 AM
                    >To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                    >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Period Bow
                    >
                    >Greetings,
                    >
                    >I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
                    >to 14th century 'France', and archery?
                    >
                    >My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
                    >central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
                    >bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.
                    >
                    >Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
                    >and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
                    >I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
                    >need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
                    >like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.
                    >
                    >Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
                    >materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
                    >should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
                    >competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?
                    >
                    >Thank You,
                    >
                    >Cuvien

                    The French were not particularly noted for the use of the bow. Being the weapon of a peasant, it was beneath the dignity of a French knight to use, and they didn't much like the idea of having their serfs armed with a weapon that could kill a knight from a distance(or kill one at all; after all, peasants were there to BE killed, not kill their betters!). If the French decided that they needed long-distance weapons, they generally hired mercenary crossbowmen(who they then looked down on with contempt, and often rode down when the crossbowmen wouldn't get out of the knights' way fast enough to suit them).

                    Arrows for SCA use must be made of wood, with feather fletching. Good luck finding these in the average sporting goods store. There are several arrow makers (called "fletchers") in the Society, who can do all kinds of custom work for you.
                    If you want to make your own(which, for basic arrows, isn't hard at all) all the tools and supplies you'll need can be gotten from 3 Rivers Archery, KustomKing Archery, and several other suppliers. I reccommend a magazine called "Primitive Archer", which has lots of informaive articles, and tons of ads for primitive supplies dealers.
                    Hope this helps some.

                    Gardr Gunnarsson
                    Barony of Settmour Swamp
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Terrance Timmons
                    also as some of the people have posted, you need to find your draw length. arrow lengths should be as long as your arm (basic way to figure it out). for
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 12, 2009
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                      also as some of the people have posted, you need to find your draw length. arrow lengths should be as long as your arm (basic way to figure it out). for practice if you are not very skilled, you might want to get some metal/fibreglass types as the wood are expensive and do break if you only hit the target, usually not an issue, but when you miss, they can hit the target stand, rocks, etc. not fun.

                      Terrance
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: cuvien1438
                      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2009 12:04 AM
                      Subject: [SCA-Archery] Period Bow


                      Greetings,

                      I was wondering if anyone could help me with some information relating
                      to 14th century 'France', and archery?

                      My personae is occitan, which is a mountainous region of what is now
                      central France. I can't find any information to tell me what kind of
                      bow these people used, and what sort of wood it might have been made of.

                      Also, by pure chance I was gifted a recurve bow from an acquaintance
                      and I was thinking of just using this and going to archery practice but
                      I don't have any arrows. Should I just buy some regular arrows? Or do I
                      need some kind of special arrows? I know I want to be period, and I
                      like to make my own stuff, so maybe I should just make my own.

                      Looking at archery sites, I see a lot of different points and
                      materials. How do I know what size shafts to buy and how long they
                      should be? What points are used in archery practices and sca
                      competitions? And where should I buy my supplies?

                      Thank You,

                      Cuvien





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • James Koch
                      Gentlemen & Ladies, ... I earlier offered to make two archer s swords available as prizes for a shoot to be held at Pennsic. The plan is to offer a falchion
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 28, 2009
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                        Gentlemen & Ladies,
                        >
                        I earlier offered to make two archer's swords available as prizes for
                        a shoot to be held at Pennsic. The plan is to offer a falchion and a
                        katzbalger, both of which I have already made. The falchion will go
                        to the hand bow shooter and the katzbalger to the crossbow shooter
                        with the winning scores. It recently occurred to me that this shoot
                        could be held during one of the try outs for the champion's shoot
                        teams. The marshals are already on the range and the range is
                        already closed for the day. Since the try outs are open to pretty
                        much everyone, this would save having to set up a special shoot on
                        another day. It would also reward the folks who come out every year
                        to compete on the champions teams. The scores from the competition
                        could also be used to help select members for the teams. My idea is
                        to do a simple retreating butt elimination shoot. You know, like in
                        the movie Robin Hood. Any thoughts on this?
                        >
                        Jim Koch "Gladius The Alchemist"
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