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weight and styles of historical arrowheads

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  • Jamie
    Hi, I m doing my doctoral research on early Iron Age arrowheads in the ancient Near East, and I ve come across some issues where I think some cross-cultural
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 7, 2009
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      Hi, I'm doing my doctoral research on early Iron Age arrowheads in
      the ancient Near East, and I've come across some issues where I think
      some cross-cultural comparisons with well-researched fields (Medieval
      Europe, Japan, etc.) could be very helpful, but of which I am
      thoroughly ignorant, alas. I've done some searching, but have not
      yet been able to find sources that answer the particular questions I
      have.

      Does anyone know of any source that discusses the weights of
      arrowheads? Many of the larger arrowheads I deal with could be
      javelin or dart heads, so it would be useful to know what the
      practical upper limit for the weight of an arrowhead is. I have one
      source that suggests 10g, but seemed tolerably hazy about it. Am I
      also right in presuming that the fact that these arrows used
      lightweight reed shafts would affect the weight of arrowhead they
      would be able to bear?

      Also, are there sources that discuss in detail the functions of the
      different forms of arrowheads used? Bodkins are of course for
      puncturing protected targets, and broadhead types presumably to
      maximize bleeding, but I'd really like some more detail. In
      particular, we have a very common 3-bladed form (I gather much like
      modern hunting arrows), which I presume was intended to combine light
      weight for long range with an extra cutting surface to maximize
      bleeding. I'm also curious about the effectiveness of barbs - they
      nearly always require the arrowhead to fully penetrate the target to
      be effective.

      Any suggestions you might have would be much appreciated!

      cheers,
      Jamie
    • julian wilson
      Jamie, you could try e-mailling Hetor Cole - he s said to be England s premier Arrowsmith [so  I am given to understand]; and is also said to know more about
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 7, 2009
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        Jamie,
        you could try e-mailling Hetor Cole - he's said to be England's premier Arrowsmith [so  I am given to understand]; and is also said to know more about arrowheads than anyone else in England.
        He supplies replica arrowheads [and a few other things] to National Museums such as The Tower Armouries, to English Heritage, to The National Trust, and to a large number of the UK's  re-enactment Societies.
        He has a website, which you'll find through a Yahoo or Google search.

         Good luck,

        Julian Wilson



        --- On Wed, 7/1/09, Jamie <ushumgal@...> wrote:
        From: Jamie <ushumgal@...>
        Subject: [SCA-Archery] weight and styles of historical arrowheads
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, 7 January, 2009, 3:20 PM











        Hi, I'm doing my doctoral research on early Iron Age arrowheads in

        the ancient Near East, and I've come across some issues where I think

        some cross-cultural comparisons with well-researched fields (Medieval

        Europe, Japan, etc.) could be very helpful, but of which I am

        thoroughly ignorant, alas. I've done some searching, but have not

        yet been able to find sources that answer the particular questions I

        have.



        Does anyone know of any source that discusses the weights of

        arrowheads? Many of the larger arrowheads I deal with could be

        javelin or dart heads, so it would be useful to know what the

        practical upper limit for the weight of an arrowhead is. I have one

        source that suggests 10g, but seemed tolerably hazy about it. Am I

        also right in presuming that the fact that these arrows used

        lightweight reed shafts would affect the weight of arrowhead they

        would be able to bear?



        Also, are there sources that discuss in detail the functions of the

        different forms of arrowheads used? Bodkins are of course for

        puncturing protected targets, and broadhead types presumably to

        maximize bleeding, but I'd really like some more detail. In

        particular, we have a very common 3-bladed form (I gather much like

        modern hunting arrows), which I presume was intended to combine light

        weight for long range with an extra cutting surface to maximize

        bleeding. I'm also curious about the effectiveness of barbs - they

        nearly always require the arrowhead to fully penetrate the target to

        be effective.



        Any suggestions you might have would be much appreciated!



        cheers,

        Jamie


























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jameswolfden
        Hector Cole s website is www.hectorcoleironwork.com Check out the articles section. He describes a japanese arrowhead he made that came out a over 40 grams. He
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 7, 2009
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          Hector Cole's website is

          www.hectorcoleironwork.com

          Check out the articles section. He describes a japanese arrowhead he
          made that came out a over 40 grams. He has another article that looks
          at the different types of medieval arrowheads and their particular
          purpose.

          In Service,
          James
        • ld.blackmoon
          greetings you might try looking in secrets of the english war bow by hugh d.h. soar he has some excellent pics of different mideaval arrowheads , as
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 7, 2009
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            greetings

            you might try looking in " secrets of the english war bow " by hugh d.h. soar
            he has some excellent pics of different mideaval arrowheads , as well as results as to which were best for war , and which were best for hunting , some with surprising results when shot through armor into pig carcus .

            be safe, be happy, have fun
            arthur


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Jamie
            To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 9:20 AM
            Subject: [SCA-Archery] weight and styles of historical arrowheads


            Hi, I'm doing my doctoral research on early Iron Age arrowheads in
            the ancient Near East, and I've come across some issues where I think
            some cross-cultural comparisons with well-researched fields (Medieval
            Europe, Japan, etc.) could be very helpful, but of which I am
            thoroughly ignorant, alas. I've done some searching, but have not
            yet been able to find sources that answer the particular questions I
            have.

            Does anyone know of any source that discusses the weights of
            arrowheads? Many of the larger arrowheads I deal with could be
            javelin or dart heads, so it would be useful to know what the
            practical upper limit for the weight of an arrowhead is. I have one
            source that suggests 10g, but seemed tolerably hazy about it. Am I
            also right in presuming that the fact that these arrows used
            lightweight reed shafts would affect the weight of arrowhead they
            would be able to bear?

            Also, are there sources that discuss in detail the functions of the
            different forms of arrowheads used? Bodkins are of course for
            puncturing protected targets, and broadhead types presumably to
            maximize bleeding, but I'd really like some more detail. In
            particular, we have a very common 3-bladed form (I gather much like
            modern hunting arrows), which I presume was intended to combine light
            weight for long range with an extra cutting surface to maximize
            bleeding. I'm also curious about the effectiveness of barbs - they
            nearly always require the arrowhead to fully penetrate the target to
            be effective.

            Any suggestions you might have would be much appreciated!

            cheers,
            Jamie






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          • Jamie
            Thanks for the suggestions everyone - I ve mailed Hector Cole and am tracking down the Soar book - they look like very promising leads! For those of you
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 8, 2009
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              Thanks for the suggestions everyone - I've mailed Hector Cole and am
              tracking down the Soar book - they look like very promising leads!

              For those of you familiar with Medieval arrowheads, am I right in
              assuming that socketed arrowheads were most common in that period?
              Is this because they'd have less tendency to split the arrow shaft on
              impact, despite being somewhat more difficult to make than a tang?

              Thanks again!

              Best,
              Jamie


              --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "ld.blackmoon" <ld.blackmoon@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > greetings
              >
              > you might try looking in " secrets of the english war bow " by
              hugh d.h. soar
              > he has some excellent pics of different mideaval arrowheads , as
              well as results as to which were best for war , and which were best
              for hunting , some with surprising results when shot through armor
              into pig carcus .
              >
              > be safe, be happy, have fun
              > arthur
              >
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