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Re: flaming arrow ASAP

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  • DavidP005
    I use a mixture of saltpetre, as I also make my own slow matches for my matchlock rifle, Pine Tar and boild linseed oil in my flaming arrows. I actually use
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
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      I use a mixture of saltpetre, as I also make my own slow matches for
      my matchlock rifle, Pine Tar and boild linseed oil in my flaming
      arrows. I actually use the linseed oil to cut the Pine Tar to soak a
      piece of cloth that I bind to the arrow. I've found the saltpetre
      helps keep the mixture going in flight.

      Tex

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder
      Lutre <Merry@...> wrote:
      >
      > Heck, if you're gonna do that, why not use magnesium :) If you
      can
      > get it lit, you wouldn't be able to blow it out regardless....
      Certainly
      > would make for an impressive flame :)
      >
      > James Koch wrote:
      > > I tend to agree regarding using saltpetre. I used to soak cotton
      > > rope in a solution of saltpetre and allow it to dry to make slow
      > > match. Once lit he slow match would smoulder in still air and
      glow
      > > brightly in a strong wind. Potassium Nitrate "Chile Saltpeter"
      works
      > > best since it is less hydrophilic than sodium nitrate. If a
      cloth
      > > was treated with saltpetre and then soaked in naptha, once lit it
      > > would difficult to blow out.
      > > >
      > > Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > At 02:34 PM 10/2/2008, you wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >> I think your thinking of Saltpetre ( potassium nitrate) which is
      an
      > >> ingredient of gunpowder and is used to make things like incense,
      > >> rope and cigarettes to
      > >> keep these items from going out and controlling the burn. May be
      helpful with
      > >> a fire arrow....
      > >> Richard
      > >> In a message dated 10/2/08 12:34:23 PM,
      > >> <mailto:sandra.rangel16%40yahoo.com>sandra.rangel16@... writes:
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>> Anyone try jet feul? Maybe it will stay lit while the arrow is
      in
      > >>> flight? Just a thought, never tried but then again the way gas
      prices
      > >>> are it might be expensive to test. I think somewhere I read that
      > >>> there's a small amount they put in cigarette's too (ever wonder
      why
      > >>> they stay lit even in wind?) Maybe that's a myth but I don't
      smoke
      > >>> either way!
      > >>>
      > >>> ~Rohesia
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >> **************
      > >> Looking for simple solutions to your real-life financial
      > >> challenges? Check out WalletPop for the latest news and
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      > >> (<http://www.walletpop.com/?
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      > >>
      > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > >
      >
      > --
      >
      > // Merry
      >
      > ----------
      > "Merry" Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre AoA:071013 Torse:080906
      > Shire of Standing Stones; Formerly: Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
      > Christian M. Cepel --- 573.999.2370 --- Columbia, MO
      > http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
      > ICQ:12384980 YIM/AOL:Bramblethorne MSN:Merry@ShireOfS.....
      >
      > 'Toirdhealbhach' anglicized Tirloughe (1576), modernly 'Turlough',
      > pronounced 'TIR' or 'TUR' + 'low', 'logh', 'lock', or 'loch'
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • arturdubh
      Well, a person can, indeed, learn something new every day if they aren t careful. :-) Thanks for the correction -- and for providing it without being
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
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        Well, a person can, indeed, learn something new every day if they
        aren't careful. :-)

        Thanks for the correction -- and for providing it without being
        condescending. It is difficult to discern exactly what something is
        made of in a grainy/blurry picture. I freely admit that I was
        guessing they were made of clay....and clay would, of course, tend to
        break on impact.

        Say, that does give one an idea. How about some "experimental
        archaeology"?

        --Artúr


        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "jameswolfden" <jameswolfden@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > If you mean these ones,
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-
        > Archery/photos/album/965722480/pic/2050126555/view?
        > picmode=large&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&dir=asc
        >
        > They are Chinese whistling fire arrows from Stephen Selby's display
        > in Hong Kong. They are made of iron not clay. Oil and pitch soaked
        > cloth would be wrapped above the barbs in the arrow. The barbs
        would
        > prevent the flaming material from sliding back down the shaft on
        > release.
        >
        > Here is a write up on whistling arrows from the ATARN site that
        also
        > includes a bit on the fire arrows.
        >
        > http://www.atarn.org/chinese/whistle/whistle.htm
        >
        >
        > In Service,
        > James Wolfden
        >
        > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "arturdubh" <nasionnaich@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Dave;
        > >
        > > There is a picture of some specially-made arrow heads, for use
        > > with "flame arrows", in the "Photos" section of the group; for
        > some
        > > reason I can't connect to the page right now, probably yet
        > > another "Yahoo! glitch"... Anyway, they seem to be made of clay,
        > with
        > > a cavity similar to that of a whstling arrow, designed to break
        > open
        > > on impact. Perhaps the flammable material was shoved inside,
        > soaked
        > > with naptha (or any other substance such as kerosene), lit and
        > sent
        > > on its way.
        > >
        > > In any case, they look to be extremely efficient.
        > >
        > > --Artúr
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <gargoyle1058@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I need any and all info that you may have on ways to make a
        > > workable flaming arrow ASAP modern or otherwise for use in any
        > type
        > > of bow including crossbows. This is not for a SCA project. Thank
        > > you, Gar
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Andrew
        I posted a picture of a cage Fire Arrowhead in the Miscellaneous folder in the photo section.... perhaps that might give you an Idea ... flaming arrow ASAP
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 4, 2008
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          I posted a picture of a "cage Fire Arrowhead" in the Miscellaneous
          folder in the photo section.... perhaps that might give you an Idea


          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <gargoyle1058@...> wrote:
          >
          > I need any and all info that you may have on ways to make a workable
          flaming arrow ASAP modern or otherwise for use in any type of bow
          including crossbows. This is not for a SCA project. Thank you, Gar
          >
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