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Re: Sir Jon in Primitive Archer magazine

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  • jameswolfden
    It is sometimes hard to tell whether the dimensions are correct in the diagrams or some bit of artistic license is used. That said, it is still fairly common
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 20, 2008
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      It is sometimes hard to tell whether the dimensions are correct in
      the diagrams or some bit of artistic license is used. That said, it
      is still fairly common in some archery cultures for the spectators
      and marshalls to be fairly close.

      I don't think this represents a disregard for human life or lack of
      knowledge about the lethality of all arrows including target blunts.
      There were laws in place that covered fatalities as a result of
      archery practises.

      I think it does speak of the expected skill of the participants.

      I drive my car down the highway at 50 MPH with other cars coming the
      other way also travelling at 50 MPH. The only thing separating my
      lane from their lane is one or two white lines. And even though I
      don't know the people in the other lane, I expect their skill to be
      sufficient enough that they won't come wondering into my lane killing
      us both.

      We can look back and find a small number of historical references to
      accidental killings on the archery range. I wonder if future
      historians will look back and wonder why we ever allowed opposing
      traffic so close together. From the records, we must have known how
      lethal it was.

      In Service,
      James Wolfden

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "arturdubh" <nasionnaich@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Just got the latest issue of Primitive Archer Magazine (Volume 16
      Issue
      > 5) in the mail today... The article on Mediaeval targets by Sir Jon
      > ("The Roundel", page 56) is absolutely fantastic! If you don't
      already
      > subscribe to this wonderful magazine, may I suggest that you do so
      ASAP.
      >
      > I find it rather illuminating (dare I use that term?) that
      spectators
      > and "staff" were allowed to sit next to targets and such while the
      > archers were busy shooting at those same targets... In my opinion,
      it
      > speaks of the skill of the archers -- and the seeming uncaring for
      > human life (or perhaps the knowledge that arrows will kill,
      > even "target arrows") of the society of the time.
      >
      > Again, Sir Jon, fantastic article!
      >
      > --Artúr
      >
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