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Re: new to archery

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  • logantheboweyder
    A hanging quilt on the side of that shed would go a good ways towards saving the shed wall from further abuse. Logan
    Message 1 of 42 , Sep 9, 2008
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      A hanging quilt on the side of that shed would go a good ways towards
      saving the shed wall from further abuse.

      Logan

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Ingunn" <weasel2008@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello!!
      >
      > I'm new to archery. I just started yesterday (much to the many
      > dimpled-dents in my lawn shed) ...

      >
      > Ingunn
      >
    • logantheboweyder
      My experience has been for me that fishtailing was caused by the arrow hitting the bow. Fletching did nothing to stop it, but only tended to make recovery
      Message 42 of 42 , Sep 24, 2008
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        My experience has been for me that fishtailing was caused by the arrow
        hitting the bow. Fletching did nothing to stop it, but only tended to
        make recovery happen quicker. Changing the spine, arrow length, FOC
        (balance from front to back), or tip weight has been the most
        effective ways of getting this cured, in descending order.

        In the below example, it sounds like the heavier shafts changed the
        FOC just enough that the arrow wasn't flexing enough to get the back
        end out of the way as it passed the bow. Reducing spine a bit would
        be the solution, but since the arrows were already made the only
        remaining remedy would be to add tip weight... which is what was
        apparently effective.

        Logan
        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Ben Grant" <beinirthunnkarr@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Tom Pilcher <tpilcher@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Fishtailing is also a factor of spine weight.
        > >
        > > Arrows that are too light tend to fishtail while arrows that are
        too
        > heavy tend to shoot left. Heavier points accentuate the fishtail but
        > larger fletchings decrease it.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Master James Llewellyn ap Gruffydd
        > >
        >
        > This is true, but sometimes, heavier points can also solve problems.
        >
        > A month or two ago, one of our veteran archers started to experience
        > erratic flight from his newly made arrows. This Lord is very
        > experienced and in truth has TAUGHT most of us here most of what we
        > know about arrow craft. We just couldn't seem to figure out what the
        > problem was. They were spined right. The fletchings were aligned
        > properly. The shafts were good and straight. We bounced around many
        > ideas and then we hit on a suspect. Weight! or more properly
        > balance! The new arrows were slightly heavier or more dense, so
        using
        > the same old 125 grain points made his arrows tail heavy allowing
        them
        > to "nose around" very oddly. I gave him a few of my 145's and
        > proposed an experiment. After testing with the newly re-tipped
        arrows
        > there was a marked improvement in their flight.
        > This is just another example of the complexity involved in such a
        > seemingly simple task. It's a lot more than just gluing feathers to
        a
        > sharp stick. Change one variable and you alter the whole formula.
        > But if it weren't challenging it wouldn't be fun.
        >
        > Beinir
        >
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