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I have a question.

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  • Aeddan Ivor
    I have a question for everyone here. When an archer would travel, what was the most convenient way of carrying their bows? Did they strap it on their backs or
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 7, 2008
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      I have a question for everyone here.
      When an archer would travel, what was the most convenient way of
      carrying their bows?
      Did they strap it on their backs or did they carry it like a walking
      stick?

      Aeddan
    • Wolferam
      If they didn t have a cart at their disposal, then it was most likely carried on their backs. Using a bow as a walking stick would be extremely bad for the
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 7, 2008
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        If they didn't have a cart at their disposal, then it was most likely carried on their backs. Using a bow as a walking stick would be extremely bad for the bow.

        Wolferam

        --- On Sun, 9/7/08, Aeddan Ivor <aeddanivor@...> wrote:
        From: Aeddan Ivor <aeddanivor@...>
        Subject: [SCA-Archery] I have a question.
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, September 7, 2008, 6:12 PM











        I have a question for everyone here.

        When an archer would travel, what was the most convenient way of

        carrying their bows?

        Did they strap it on their backs or did they carry it like a walking

        stick?



        Aeddan





























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Emil Stecher
        ... The correct phrasing of this question is, How would a longbow be stowed by a traveler in period ... since I doubt that an Italian or Spanish arbalester
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 8, 2008
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          --- On Sun, 9/7/08, Aeddan Ivor <aeddanivor@...> wrote:

          > From: Aeddan Ivor <aeddanivor@...>
          > Subject: [SCA-Archery] I have a question.
          > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Sunday, September 7, 2008, 7:12 PM
          > I have a question for everyone here.
          > When an archer would travel, what was the most convenient
          > way of
          > carrying their bows?
          > Did they strap it on their backs or did they carry it like
          > a walking
          > stick?
          >
          > Aeddan
          >

          The correct phrasing of this question is, "How would a longbow be stowed by a traveler in period ..." since I doubt that an Italian or Spanish arbalester would use his crossbow as a walking stick, nor would most Central Asiatic archers, since their bows would be in the bowcase secured either to their waist or their horse's saddle.

          Barak Raz
          (Emil M Stecher)
          (gwrgi at yahoo dot com)
        • Cian of Storvik
          Living history groups are repleat with bow socks with shoulder slings. Most demand the sock must be wool. The only source I can find for a bow sock is Roger
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 8, 2008
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            Living history groups are repleat with "bow socks" with shoulder
            slings. Most demand the sock must be wool.

            The only source I can find for a bow sock is Roger Ascham's Toxophilus
            where he recommends a canvas or wool case to protect the bow from the
            elements. I wish I could think of a period illustration where they
            might show such a case in use, but I do not recollect any such images.

            If you're talking recurves, then the hip slung bow case similar to
            mongolians is probably okay.
            See "Concordantiae caritatis" circa 1350 folio 114.
            http://tarvos.imareal.oeaw.ac.at/server/images/7004856.JPG
            -Cian
          • Michael Grossberg
            ... From: Cian of Storvik To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com Sent: 9/8/2008 2:35:06 PM Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: I have a question. If you re talking recurves,
            Message 5 of 15 , Sep 8, 2008
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              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Cian of Storvik
              To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: 9/8/2008 2:35:06 PM
              Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: I have a question.



              If you're talking recurves, then the hip slung bow case similar to
              mongolians is probably okay.
              See "Concordantiae caritatis" circa 1350 folio 114.
              http://tarvos.imareal.oeaw.ac.at/server/images/7004856.JPG
              -Cian


              I'm not thoroughly familiar with the Mongol style bowcase, but didn't it
              require the
              bow to be carried already strung? Not a very good idea for a
              modern(expensive)
              recurve. Bows of the period were much more easily acquired, so that if one
              was
              ruined by being constantly strung it would be easier to replace.
              My tuppence. Please feel free to properly enlighten me.

              Gardr Gunnarsson(user of a Viking style longbow, which I carry, unstrung,
              in a cloth
              case, usually held in my bow hand)


              _
            • eulenhorst@rosesandivy.net
              The concept that modern recurves are particularly vulnerable to being left strung is highly overrated. I have often left my modern competitions bows strung
              Message 6 of 15 , Sep 8, 2008
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                The concept that modern recurves are particularly vulnerable to being left strung is highly overrated. I
                have often left my modern competitions bows strung for extended periods of time and commonly leave them
                setup for the entire period of a multiple day shoot. The safety of this has been repeatedly confirmed to
                me by technical experts from Hoyt, Yamaha, and other archry manufacturers. There is little, if any
                diffenence in limb construction between modern recurves and compound bows which are never unstrung. The
                difference in performance coming from the cam action, limb angle and length, and pre-stress limits.

                The damage to traditional bows comes from the extended stretching of the sapwood or other elastic wood
                elements. When the elastic components are horn, sinew, or other materials they do not show the same
                vulnerabilities.
                Carolus

                On Mon Sep 8 11:47 , 'Michael Grossberg' <geejayem@...> sent:
                >----- Original Message -----
                >
                >From: Cian of Storvik
                >
                >To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >Sent: 9/8/2008 2:35:06 PM
                >
                >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: I have a question.
                >
                >
                >
                >If you're talking recurves, then the hip slung bow case similar to
                >
                >mongolians is probably okay.
                >
                >See "Concordantiae caritatis" circa 1350 folio 114.
                >
                >http://tarvos.imareal.oeaw.ac.at/server/images/7004856.JPG
                >
                >-Cian
                >
                >
                >
                >I'm not thoroughly familiar with the Mongol style bowcase, but didn't it
                >
                >require the
                >
                >bow to be carried already strung? Not a very good idea for a
                >
                >modern(expensive)
                >
                >recurve. Bows of the period were much more easily acquired, so that if one
                >
                >was
                >
                >ruined by being constantly strung it would be easier to replace.
                >
                >My tuppence. Please feel free to properly enlighten me.
                >
                >
                >
                >Gardr Gunnarsson(user of a Viking style longbow, which I carry, unstrung,
                >
                >in a cloth
                >
                >case, usually held in my bow hand)
                >
                >
                >
                >_
                >
                >
                >
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                >
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              • Aeddan Ivor
                Thank you all for you help in this.
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                  Thank you all for you help in this.
                • Michael Grossberg
                  ... left strung is highly overrated. I ... of time and commonly leave them ... has been repeatedly confirmed to ... manufacturers. There is little, if any
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                    > [Original Message]
                    > From: <eulenhorst@...>
                    > To: <SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Date: 9/8/2008 6:36:14 PM
                    > Subject: RE: [SCA-Archery] Re: I have a question.
                    >
                    > The concept that modern recurves are particularly vulnerable to being
                    left strung is highly overrated. I
                    > have often left my modern competitions bows strung for extended periods
                    of time and commonly leave them
                    > setup for the entire period of a multiple day shoot. The safety of this
                    has been repeatedly confirmed to
                    > me by technical experts from Hoyt, Yamaha, and other archry
                    manufacturers. There is little, if any
                    > diffenence in limb construction between modern recurves and compound bows
                    which are never unstrung. The
                    > difference in performance coming from the cam action, limb angle and
                    length, and pre-stress limits.
                    >
                    > The damage to traditional bows comes from the extended stretching of the
                    sapwood or other elastic wood
                    > elements. When the elastic components are horn, sinew, or other
                    materials they do not show the same
                    > vulnerabilities.
                    > Carolus

                    Carolus.
                    Thank you for the correction. My information was obviously sadly out of
                    date.
                    Gard
                  • Carolus
                    No problem. We often work on the basis of material written in the late Victorian era or on common knowledge passed from person to person.Much of it is
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                      No problem. We often work on the basis of material written in the
                      late Victorian era or on "common knowledge" passed from person to
                      person.Much of it is incomplete or even outright false but we have no
                      way of knowing until some one finds and presents the new
                      information. Boy, have I been bit by that one in the past (probably
                      still have some of that old info in my knowledge file as well).
                      Carolus

                      At 07:45 AM 9/9/2008, you wrote:
                      >Carolus.
                      >Thank you for the correction. My information was obviously sadly out of
                      >date.
                      >Gard
                    • Nest verch Tangwistel
                      Well, there is still the question of where it could be left when strung. I know the local archery shops have had their loaner modern recurve bows strung
                      Message 10 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                        Well, there is still the question of where it could be left when strung. I know the local archery shops have had their loaner modern recurve bows strung continuously for the last 20 years. Most of the bows have actually stood up to that fairly well. a couple warped limbs, but we are talking about 20 years. They sit indoors in a controlled environment hanging from pegs. The Black Widow company actually recommends you store it strung hanging from the string. However, I know one person who left their bow strung in their tent. Oops...too hot....delamination. He figured it would not get too hot.
                         
                        Nest

                        --- On Tue, 9/9/08, Carolus <eulenhorst@...> wrote:

                        From: Carolus <eulenhorst@...>
                        Subject: RE: [SCA-Archery] Re: I have a question.
                        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Tuesday, September 9, 2008, 11:00 AM






                        No problem. We often work on the basis of material written in the
                        late Victorian era or on "common knowledge" passed from person to
                        person.Much of it is incomplete or even outright false but we have no
                        way of knowing until some one finds and presents the new
                        information. Boy, have I been bit by that one in the past (probably
                        still have some of that old info in my knowledge file as well).
                        Carolus

                        At 07:45 AM 9/9/2008, you wrote:
                        >Carolus.
                        >Thank you for the correction. My information was obviously sadly out of
                        >date.
                        >Gard


















                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Bill
                        ... Aeddan...what the archers would do would be to carry the bow over their shoulder, unless they had been fortunate enough to make, have gifted to them, or
                        Message 11 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Aeddan Ivor" <aeddanivor@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I have a question for everyone here.
                          > When an archer would travel, what was the most convenient way of
                          > carrying their bows?
                          > Did they strap it on their backs or did they carry it like a walking
                          > stick?
                          >
                          > Aeddan
                          >

                          Aeddan...what the archers would do would be to carry the bow over
                          their shoulder, unless they had been fortunate enough to make, have
                          gifted to them, or otherwise appropriated a 'bowbag', depending upon
                          the type of bow. This way the bow was relatively protected and easily
                          accessible.

                          A second part to your questions would be just as important as the
                          first "What would they do with the BOWSTRING?" It was NOT left on the
                          bow in an unstrung position but rather, carried under the archer's hat
                          as a protection against the weather and humidity. Seems rather
                          strange, considering that we now know that 60+% of our body heat is
                          lost through our head/hair; however, that is what they did. Ascham's
                          Toxophilus mentions it (I believe) as well as Roger Hardy's book
                          "Longbow". Also, read the Grail series from Bernard Cornwall as his
                          protagonist, Thomas, speaks of unstringing his bow and carrying the
                          string under his hat in inclement weather.

                          Now, my fellow archers...I have a question for YOU out there...what
                          did the archers carry their ARROWS in? And, what was the difference
                          between a hunter's quiver and a warrior's quiver, considering that
                          both; based upon the answer you provide, were made from the same type
                          of material.
                        • James Koch
                          Gentlemen & ladies, ... The answer of course depends on where and when. In the West arrows were carried in cloth bags and stuck in the belt when ready to
                          Message 12 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                            Gentlemen & ladies,



                            >Now, my fellow archers...I have a question for YOU out there...what
                            >did the archers carry their ARROWS in? And, what was the difference
                            >between a hunter's quiver and a warrior's quiver, considering that
                            >both; based upon the answer you provide, were made from the same type
                            >of material.
                            The answer of course depends on where and when. In the West arrows
                            were carried in cloth bags and stuck in the belt when ready to
                            shoot. This makes sense with ash and similar hard wood shafts. I'd
                            tend to break cedar shafts carrying them through the woods stuck in
                            my belt. Belt quivers were used and back quivers have been
                            documented. In the East leather bow/arrow quivers were also
                            carried. Crossbow bolts had box shaped quivers and were brought to
                            battles in barrels.
                            >
                            Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
                          • Michael Grossberg
                            ... From: Bill To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com Sent: 9/9/2008 2:59:21 PM Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: I have a question. A Now, my fellow archers...I have a
                            Message 13 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Bill
                              To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: 9/9/2008 2:59:21 PM
                              Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: I have a question.


                              A
                              Now, my fellow archers...I have a question for YOU out there...what
                              did the archers carry their ARROWS in? And, what was the difference
                              between a hunter's quiver and a warrior's quiver, considering that
                              both; based upon the answer you provide, were made from the same type
                              of material.


                              _IMHO, the difference would be mostly capacity. A quiver for hunting,
                              either belt- or
                              back-carried, would need to hold only a few arrows, as you wouldn't be
                              taking very many
                              shots. A war quiver, on the other hand, would need to hold a great many
                              arrows, as you'd be
                              using them up at a great rate. The English at the Big Three battles(that
                              would be Crecy, Poictiers,
                              and Agincourt, of course) had their arrows in cloth bags, which were
                              transported by wagons, the
                              bags being grabbed up as needed.
                              Also, the difference in head shape between war and hunting arrows. Hunting
                              arrows would've been
                              (and still are) much broader, to provide more cutting edge. War
                              arrows(especially armor-piercing
                              bodkin points) wouldn't need as much room at the bottom of the quiver.
                              Again, my opinion.
                              Gardr Gunnarsson
                            • MerrisaSJC@aol.com
                              I have a Windstar II bow that is a FITA style recurve and have also confirmed that it is ok to leave it strung for long periods of time. It was suggested to
                              Message 14 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                                I have a Windstar II bow that is a FITA style recurve and have also
                                confirmed that it is ok to leave it strung for long periods of time. It was
                                suggested to me that this would be also be preferred to avoid limb twisting that can
                                be imparted by an improperly strung bow and to help eliminate string stretch
                                over a long period of shooting like several days. Remember consistency.

                                However, this is only true with fiberglass or other composite material bows.
                                I do not nor will I ever leave any of my self long bows or other wood bows
                                that I have made strung for longer than I would shoot it for at any one time.
                                Leaving it strung is hard on the wood fibers and cause a really bad set or
                                string follow to the bow.

                                Merrisa



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                              • MerrisaSJC@aol.com
                                I didn t like the way the arrows dipped. The paint right from the container is thicker than I wanted and caused a really thick dip with both the white and
                                Message 15 of 15 , Sep 9, 2008
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                                  I didn't like the way the arrows dipped. The paint right from the container
                                  is thicker than I wanted and caused a really thick dip with both the white
                                  and the yellow. I really was not sure about thinning it out as this was the
                                  first time I had dipped an arrow let alone done a crown dip. Also with it
                                  going on so thick it made me concerned about weight being added to the rear of
                                  the arrow and taking away from the advantage of the footed design, that being
                                  weight being forward without changing mass.

                                  Merrisa

                                  aka

                                  Asha Willow



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                                  plus the latest fall trends and hair styles at StyleList.com.
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