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Was: (Glueing feather) - arrow constuction

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  • L & M Romanowski
    ... My method is with pure Boning finish products. I have used Duco instead of Fletch-tite with just as good success. I use only steel wool with my shafts.
    Message 1 of 1 , May 29, 2000
      Chris Nogy wrote:

      > This is how I finish my 'modern' arrows.
      >
      > I usually finish my shafts with sandpaper (600 grit) and then steel wool (0000). If you dampen the shaft lightly between sandings then lightly knock off the fuzz that rises, after 2 sandings and 1 steel wooling you end up with a very smooth shaft.
      >
      > Then I fletch (using a cyano-acrylate glue and accelerator), then I dip the shaft to the fletches and using a small sponge brush I apply the Polyurethane (Minwax satin is my choice) thickly to the channels between the fletches and let it run down. It covers the joint and part of the quill, and weatherproofs and protects the joint.

      My method is with pure Boning finish products. I have used Duco instead of Fletch-tite with just as good success. I use only steel wool with my shafts. Wooling the bare shaft. Stain then wool again. Dip in clear twice and wool in between. Then dip in white for nine inches on the nock end if desired, twice.

      The Boning products are three times the Minwax products but I think you could use Duco cement with Minwax and get the same tough results. Your colors are limited though and I have not experimented with mixing the Boning colors and the Minwax finish. (has anyone tried this?)

      I also trim the ends of the quills and add an extra drop of glue to hold them on better.(abuse from the shelf and targets could peel back your feathers prematurely)

      I cannot recall problems with weather or losing feathers or loosing points or nocks. I still have arrows that are 5 seasons old and in use. They usually end up broken or lost before they fail. (I have a secret for keeping the nocks on)


      > Steel wool the poly when it is completely dry, then a quick coat of light paste wax, buffed, and you will have no problem retrieving them out of even the toughest ethafoam target.
      >

      Even easier is spraying pure silicone on the first 7-8 inches of the shaft. Let them sit overnight and you won't have any problems in ANY target. Don't go up higher on the shaft or you won't be able to pull them out. I usually redo them after 4 or 5 full days of shooting.

      Marcus Caruana
      Forester of the Middle
      Barony of Roaring Wastes
      House Loch Mor
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