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Re: [SCA-Archery] Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources? Sculpty? - Followup

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  • 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
    Btw folks. I had already purchased some Scuply before the conversation on the topic had gotten underway and I finally was in front of a TV at a friend s
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
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      Btw folks. I had already purchased some Scuply before the
      conversation on the topic had gotten underway and I finally was in front
      of a TV at a friend's house with idle hands a week or two ago and had a
      go. Having never used it before it's possible that I didn't cure/cook
      it properly, but I'm thinking that this isn't the case, and my
      conclusion is that the stuff is useful for decoration only and not up to
      even a fraction of the stresses involved. Oh well. It looked pretty
      until squeezed it to see if it would take any use and it crushed like a bug.

      'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre wrote:
      > Wow. Excellent. I had also forgotten about what's in my own back
      > yard here at MU (Not that one can see them.. they are all in storage)
      > http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/online/thumbring/thumbring.shtml
      >
      > Was surprised to find a wikipedia article... links to a page on how to
      > make a thumb ring from a billiard ball *boggle*
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thumb_ring
      >
      > Thank you!
      >
      > George Bottorf wrote:
      >
      >> Greetings, Merry. I agree the price of thumb rings is a bit pricy. A lot of work to make, tho. I went looking for info and found a bunch of it! I found the best info on Korean archery. Let me show you.
      >> 1- Search: Sugakji thumb rings.
      >> got 3 sites. Wooden thumb rings. Use previous and next to follow all pages. A lot of info there. All 3 sites good.
      >> 2- Go to ATARN.ORG Look around. Much stuff there.
      >> 3- Korean Traditonal Archery.Org. Ditto.
      >> 4- Go to Leatherwall. Ditto.
      >> 5- Look at Sugakji thumb ring tutorial.
      >> 6-You can use a 3/4" pvc 45 degree elbow to make a thumb ring. Just a bit of cut and trim. Not real fancy, but mine should work as soon as I finish sanding it a bit. BTW, the pvc ring is the female design. The Sugakji is the male version. I will try both and see which works for me. There, that should hold you for a spell. You might also want to search just for Thumb Rings. Can't hurt. More info. I plan to use a low pondage bow to learn the use of the ring! No sense in hurting yourself at the start. I hope this will be of some small use for you. YIS, Abner de Plunkett. West Kingdom archer and crossbowman.
      >>
      >>
      >> -----Original Message-----
      >> From: 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
      >> Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 12:03 PM
      >> To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      >> Subject: [SCA-Archery] Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources? Sculpty?
      >>
      >> I'm afraid the $32+ hand-carved horn thumbrings from Three Rivers are a
      >> little out of my price range at the moment and I'd like to have a go at
      >> making my own (200 arrows a day is leaving my ring finger quite swollen).
      >>
      >> Wondering if anyone knows of any good online resources with instructions
      >> for constructing one's own thumbring.
      >>
      >> I'm also wondering if any of the bake-able polymer sculpting clay
      >> products like Sculpey
      >> <http://www.sculpey.com/Products/products_poly_origsculp.htm>or Sculpey
      >> Ultra-light, et. al., will work for this. I've thought about trying to
      >> file down Schedule 80 or 40 PVC pipe and boiling it to let me shape it
      >> (I've used an oven before to straighten schedule 80 pipe when making
      >> Irish Flutes before, being careful to vent fumes. I think it softens
      >> around 300 degrees F).
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >

      --

      // Merry

      ----------
      'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
      Shire of Standing Stones; Formerly: Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
      Christian M. Cepel --- 573.999.2370 --- Columbia, MO
      http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
      ICQ:12384980 YIM/AOL:Bramblethorne MSN:Merry@ShireOfS.....

      'Toirdhealbhach' anglicized Tirloughe (1576), modernly 'Turlough',
      pronounced 'TIR' or 'TUR' + 'low', 'logh', 'lock', or 'loch'



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • logantheboweyder
      I suspect if you were wanting to go the clay-route, you would probably need some porcelain china grade clay, and firing temps that are somewhat beyond backyard
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
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        I suspect if you were wanting to go the clay-route, you would
        probably need some porcelain china grade clay, and firing temps that
        are somewhat beyond backyard firing capabilities. Much easier would
        be bronze casting, which can be done pretty easily. Aluminum might
        work as well, in which case you could do it with a carved piece of
        wax, your sculpey for a mold, a ceramic coffee cup for a crucible,
        crushed pop cans for an aluminum source, and a campfire as a heat
        source. I'm not exactly sure what you would use for a ladle to
        scoop out the foam from the top of the molten aluminum before
        pouring, but you could probably figure out something.

        Obviously, this is not a safe activity, and you should do it on your
        own time and after doing research on safety precations, etc...

        Logan

        PS - 2 weeks to Lillies, where I would be willing to bet that a
        merchant will be selling thumb rings.

        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder
        Lutre <Merry@...> wrote:
        >
        > Btw folks. I had already purchased some Scuply before the
        > conversation on the topic had gotten underway and I finally was in
        front
        > of a TV at a friend's house with idle hands a week or two ago and
        had a
        > go. Having never used it before it's possible that I didn't
        cure/cook
        > it properly, but I'm thinking that this isn't the case, and my
        > conclusion is that the stuff is useful for decoration only and not
        up to
        > even a fraction of the stresses involved. Oh well. It looked
        pretty
        > until squeezed it to see if it would take any use and it crushed
        like a bug.
        >
        > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre wrote:
        > > Wow. Excellent. I had also forgotten about what's in my own
        back
        > > yard here at MU (Not that one can see them.. they are all in
        storage)
        > > http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/online/thumbring/thumbring.shtml
        > >
        > > Was surprised to find a wikipedia article... links to a page on
        how to
        > > make a thumb ring from a billiard ball *boggle*
        > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thumb_ring
        > >
        > > Thank you!
        > >
        > > George Bottorf wrote:
        > >
        > >> Greetings, Merry. I agree the price of thumb rings is a bit
        pricy. A lot of work to make, tho. I went looking for info and found
        a bunch of it! I found the best info on Korean archery. Let me show
        you.
        > >> 1- Search: Sugakji thumb rings.
        > >> got 3 sites. Wooden thumb rings. Use previous and next to
        follow all pages. A lot of info there. All 3 sites good.
        > >> 2- Go to ATARN.ORG Look around. Much stuff there.
        > >> 3- Korean Traditonal Archery.Org. Ditto.
        > >> 4- Go to Leatherwall. Ditto.
        > >> 5- Look at Sugakji thumb ring tutorial.
        > >> 6-You can use a 3/4" pvc 45 degree elbow to make a thumb ring.
        Just a bit of cut and trim. Not real fancy, but mine should work as
        soon as I finish sanding it a bit. BTW, the pvc ring is the female
        design. The Sugakji is the male version. I will try both and see
        which works for me. There, that should hold you for a spell. You
        might also want to search just for Thumb Rings. Can't hurt. More
        info. I plan to use a low pondage bow to learn the use of the ring!
        No sense in hurting yourself at the start. I hope this will be of
        some small use for you. YIS, Abner de Plunkett. West Kingdom archer
        and crossbowman.
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> -----Original Message-----
        > >> From: 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
        > >> Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 12:03 PM
        > >> To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        > >> Subject: [SCA-Archery] Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources?
        Sculpty?
        > >>
        > >> I'm afraid the $32+ hand-carved horn thumbrings from Three
        Rivers are a
        > >> little out of my price range at the moment and I'd like to have
        a go at
        > >> making my own (200 arrows a day is leaving my ring finger quite
        swollen).
        > >>
        > >> Wondering if anyone knows of any good online resources with
        instructions
        > >> for constructing one's own thumbring.
        > >>
        > >> I'm also wondering if any of the bake-able polymer sculpting
        clay
        > >> products like Sculpey
        > >> <http://www.sculpey.com/Products/products_poly_origsculp.htm>or
        Sculpey
        > >> Ultra-light, et. al., will work for this. I've thought about
        trying to
        > >> file down Schedule 80 or 40 PVC pipe and boiling it to let me
        shape it
        > >> (I've used an oven before to straighten schedule 80 pipe when
        making
        > >> Irish Flutes before, being careful to vent fumes. I think it
        softens
        > >> around 300 degrees F).
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >
        > --
        >
        > // Merry
        >
        > ----------
        > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
        > Shire of Standing Stones; Formerly: Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
        > Christian M. Cepel --- 573.999.2370 --- Columbia, MO
        > http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
        > ICQ:12384980 YIM/AOL:Bramblethorne MSN:Merry@ShireOfS.....
        >
        > 'Toirdhealbhach' anglicized Tirloughe (1576), modernly 'Turlough',
        > pronounced 'TIR' or 'TUR' + 'low', 'logh', 'lock', or 'loch'
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • blkknighti@aol.com
        I dont know if this will help you but there are a number of thumb rings relatively inexpensive on ebay I searched archers ring .
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
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          I dont know if this will help you but there are a number of thumb rings
          relatively inexpensive on ebay I searched "archers ring".

          http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?from=R40&_trksid=m37&
          satitle=archers+ring&category0=

          Richard


          **************
          Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking
          with Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.

          (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4?&NCID=aolfod00030000000002)


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Carolus
          Actually, you wouldn t want an open fire as a heat source for aluminum. It is far too reactive and will result in too many inclusions and slag when exposed to
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Actually, you wouldn't want an open fire as a heat source for
            aluminum. It is far too reactive and will result in too many
            inclusions and slag when exposed to fire. Electric furnaces are used
            for melting aluminum. This is why it wasn't used commercially prior
            to the early 20th century.
            Carolus

            At 03:10 PM 6/3/2008, you wrote:

            >I suspect if you were wanting to go the clay-route, you would
            >probably need some porcelain china grade clay, and firing temps that
            >are somewhat beyond backyard firing capabilities. Much easier would
            >be bronze casting, which can be done pretty easily. Aluminum might
            >work as well, in which case you could do it with a carved piece of
            >wax, your sculpey for a mold, a ceramic coffee cup for a crucible,
            >crushed pop cans for an aluminum source, and a campfire as a heat
            >source. I'm not exactly sure what you would use for a ladle to
            >scoop out the foam from the top of the molten aluminum before
            >pouring, but you could probably figure out something.
            >
            >Obviously, this is not a safe activity, and you should do it on your
            >own time and after doing research on safety precations, etc...
            >
            >Logan
          • James of the Lake
            A crucible and a propane furnace do just fine, tho. The oxide layer on the surface of the metal protects the melt. Do this outside though and be careful!
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
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              A crucible and a propane furnace do just fine, tho. The oxide layer
              on the surface of the metal protects the melt. Do this outside
              though and be careful!

              James

              On Jun 3, 2008, at 11:20 PM, Carolus wrote:

              > Actually, you wouldn't want an open fire as a heat source for
              > aluminum. It is far too reactive and will result in too many
              > inclusions and slag when exposed to fire. Electric furnaces are used
              > for melting aluminum. This is why it wasn't used commercially prior
              > to the early 20th century.
              > Carolus
              >
              > At 03:10 PM 6/3/2008, you wrote:
              >
              >> I suspect if you were wanting to go the clay-route, you would
              >> probably need some porcelain china grade clay, and firing temps that
              >> are somewhat beyond backyard firing capabilities. Much easier would
              >> be bronze casting, which can be done pretty easily. Aluminum might
              >> work as well, in which case you could do it with a carved piece of
              >> wax, your sculpey for a mold, a ceramic coffee cup for a crucible,
              >> crushed pop cans for an aluminum source, and a campfire as a heat
              >> source. I'm not exactly sure what you would use for a ladle to
              >> scoop out the foam from the top of the molten aluminum before
              >> pouring, but you could probably figure out something.
              >>
              >> Obviously, this is not a safe activity, and you should do it on your
              >> own time and after doing research on safety precations, etc...
              >>
              >> Logan
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > --
              > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >



              jotl2008@...
            • Steven Fuller
              Yeah, having shot with a thumb ring for about a year now, I certainly wouldn t recommend Sculpey for this. Mine is made of brass (not generally period, though
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
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                Yeah, having shot with a thumb ring for about a year now, I certainly
                wouldn't recommend Sculpey for this. Mine is made of brass (not
                generally period, though later I will look into making one out of
                horn), and it, of course, stands up to the stress of the pull (Kassai
                Mongol horse bow, 47# @ 30").

                Regardless of the materials used, you will get MAJOR calluses, if not
                blisters, when using it for the first month or two. It does hurt a
                bit, but you get used to it, and then the calluses form and it's okay.
                But learning to shoot with a thumb ring really redefines how you look
                at archery. It's almost as if you have to learn how to shoot all over
                again.

                And if you plan on shooting western style, as well, I would recommend
                getting a bow to use *just* for thumb ring, and use a different one
                for western style (I use a horse bow for Mongolian and then a Martin
                X-200 recurve for western). I find it hard to switch between the two
                styles while using the same bow. It fries my brain. :) Plus,
                traditionally a right-handed archer will load a bow on the RIGHT side
                when using a thumb ring.

                -Rhys Cantor.
                Great Dark Horde
                Kingdom of Atlantia

                --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder
                Lutre <Merry@...> wrote:
                >
                > Btw folks. I had already purchased some Scuply before the
                > conversation on the topic had gotten underway and I finally was in
                front
                > of a TV at a friend's house with idle hands a week or two ago and had a
                > go. Having never used it before it's possible that I didn't cure/cook
                > it properly, but I'm thinking that this isn't the case, and my
                > conclusion is that the stuff is useful for decoration only and not
                up to
                > even a fraction of the stresses involved. Oh well. It looked pretty
                > until squeezed it to see if it would take any use and it crushed
                like a bug.
                >
                > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre wrote:
                > > Wow. Excellent. I had also forgotten about what's in my own back
                > > yard here at MU (Not that one can see them.. they are all in storage)
                > > http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/online/thumbring/thumbring.shtml
                > >
                > > Was surprised to find a wikipedia article... links to a page on
                how to
                > > make a thumb ring from a billiard ball *boggle*
                > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thumb_ring
                > >
                > > Thank you!
                > >
                > > George Bottorf wrote:
                > >
                > >> Greetings, Merry. I agree the price of thumb rings is a bit
                pricy. A lot of work to make, tho. I went looking for info and found a
                bunch of it! I found the best info on Korean archery. Let me show you.
                > >> 1- Search: Sugakji thumb rings.
                > >> got 3 sites. Wooden thumb rings. Use previous and next to
                follow all pages. A lot of info there. All 3 sites good.
                > >> 2- Go to ATARN.ORG Look around. Much stuff there.
                > >> 3- Korean Traditonal Archery.Org. Ditto.
                > >> 4- Go to Leatherwall. Ditto.
                > >> 5- Look at Sugakji thumb ring tutorial.
                > >> 6-You can use a 3/4" pvc 45 degree elbow to make a thumb ring.
                Just a bit of cut and trim. Not real fancy, but mine should work as
                soon as I finish sanding it a bit. BTW, the pvc ring is the female
                design. The Sugakji is the male version. I will try both and see which
                works for me. There, that should hold you for a spell. You might
                also want to search just for Thumb Rings. Can't hurt. More info. I
                plan to use a low pondage bow to learn the use of the ring! No sense
                in hurting yourself at the start. I hope this will be of some small
                use for you. YIS, Abner de Plunkett. West Kingdom archer and
                crossbowman.
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> -----Original Message-----
                > >> From: 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
                > >> Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 12:03 PM
                > >> To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                > >> Subject: [SCA-Archery] Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources?
                Sculpty?
                > >>
                > >> I'm afraid the $32+ hand-carved horn thumbrings from Three Rivers
                are a
                > >> little out of my price range at the moment and I'd like to have a
                go at
                > >> making my own (200 arrows a day is leaving my ring finger quite
                swollen).
                > >>
                > >> Wondering if anyone knows of any good online resources with
                instructions
                > >> for constructing one's own thumbring.
                > >>
                > >> I'm also wondering if any of the bake-able polymer sculpting clay
                > >> products like Sculpey
                > >> <http://www.sculpey.com/Products/products_poly_origsculp.htm>or
                Sculpey
                > >> Ultra-light, et. al., will work for this. I've thought about
                trying to
                > >> file down Schedule 80 or 40 PVC pipe and boiling it to let me
                shape it
                > >> (I've used an oven before to straighten schedule 80 pipe when making
                > >> Irish Flutes before, being careful to vent fumes. I think it
                softens
                > >> around 300 degrees F).
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                >
                > --
                >
                > // Merry
                >
                > ----------
                > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
                > Shire of Standing Stones; Formerly: Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
                > Christian M. Cepel --- 573.999.2370 --- Columbia, MO
                > http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
                > ICQ:12384980 YIM/AOL:Bramblethorne MSN:Merry@ShireOfS.....
                >
                > 'Toirdhealbhach' anglicized Tirloughe (1576), modernly 'Turlough',
                > pronounced 'TIR' or 'TUR' + 'low', 'logh', 'lock', or 'loch'
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • George Bottorf
                Greetings. Not to worry about brass thumb rings. Seems the Romans used bronze rings. Have seen pictures, pretty nice. Some folk also shoot thumbring put arrow
                Message 7 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Greetings. Not to worry about brass thumb rings. Seems the Romans used bronze rings. Have seen pictures, pretty nice. Some folk also shoot thumbring put arrow on left side of bow. He is top Mongolian archer. Works for him. Trick seems to just do it, not worry who does/doesn't like it! I wonder how a longbow would respond to use of thumbring. HHHMMMMM. Oh well. YIS, Abner de Plunkett. West Kingdom archer/crossbowman


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Steven Fuller
                  Sent: Wednesday, June 4, 2008 10:38 AM
                  To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources? Sculpty? - Followup

                  Yeah, having shot with a thumb ring for about a year now, I certainly
                  wouldn't recommend Sculpey for this. Mine is made of brass (not
                  generally period, though later I will look into making one out of
                  horn), and it, of course, stands up to the stress of the pull (Kassai
                  Mongol horse bow, 47# @ 30").

                  Regardless of the materials used, you will get MAJOR calluses, if not
                  blisters, when using it for the first month or two. It does hurt a
                  bit, but you get used to it, and then the calluses form and it's okay.
                  But learning to shoot with a thumb ring really redefines how you look
                  at archery. It's almost as if you have to learn how to shoot all over
                  again.

                  And if you plan on shooting western style, as well, I would recommend
                  getting a bow to use *just* for thumb ring, and use a different one
                  for western style (I use a horse bow for Mongolian and then a Martin
                  X-200 recurve for western). I find it hard to switch between the two
                  styles while using the same bow. It fries my brain. :) Plus,
                  traditionally a right-handed archer will load a bow on the RIGHT side
                  when using a thumb ring.

                  -Rhys Cantor.
                  Great Dark Horde
                  Kingdom of Atlantia

                  --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder
                  Lutre <Merry@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Btw folks. I had already purchased some Scuply before the
                  > conversation on the topic had gotten underway and I finally was in
                  front
                  > of a TV at a friend's house with idle hands a week or two ago and had a
                  > go. Having never used it before it's possible that I didn't cure/cook
                  > it properly, but I'm thinking that this isn't the case, and my
                  > conclusion is that the stuff is useful for decoration only and not
                  up to
                  > even a fraction of the stresses involved. Oh well. It looked pretty
                  > until squeezed it to see if it would take any use and it crushed
                  like a bug.
                  >
                  > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre wrote:
                  > > Wow. Excellent. I had also forgotten about what's in my own back
                  > > yard here at MU (Not that one can see them.. they are all in storage)
                  > > http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/online/thumbring/thumbring.shtml
                  > >
                  > > Was surprised to find a wikipedia article... links to a page on
                  how to
                  > > make a thumb ring from a billiard ball *boggle*
                  > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thumb_ring
                  > >
                  > > Thank you!
                  > >
                  > > George Bottorf wrote:
                  > >
                  > >> Greetings, Merry. I agree the price of thumb rings is a bit
                  pricy. A lot of work to make, tho. I went looking for info and found a
                  bunch of it! I found the best info on Korean archery. Let me show you.
                  > >> 1- Search: Sugakji thumb rings.
                  > >> got 3 sites. Wooden thumb rings. Use previous and next to
                  follow all pages. A lot of info there. All 3 sites good.
                  > >> 2- Go to ATARN.ORG Look around. Much stuff there.
                  > >> 3- Korean Traditonal Archery.Org. Ditto.
                  > >> 4- Go to Leatherwall. Ditto.
                  > >> 5- Look at Sugakji thumb ring tutorial.
                  > >> 6-You can use a 3/4" pvc 45 degree elbow to make a thumb ring.
                  Just a bit of cut and trim. Not real fancy, but mine should work as
                  soon as I finish sanding it a bit. BTW, the pvc ring is the female
                  design. The Sugakji is the male version. I will try both and see which
                  works for me. There, that should hold you for a spell. You might
                  also want to search just for Thumb Rings. Can't hurt. More info. I
                  plan to use a low pondage bow to learn the use of the ring! No sense
                  in hurting yourself at the start. I hope this will be of some small
                  use for you. YIS, Abner de Plunkett. West Kingdom archer and
                  crossbowman.
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >> -----Original Message-----
                  > >> From: 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
                  > >> Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 12:03 PM
                  > >> To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                  > >> Subject: [SCA-Archery] Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources?
                  Sculpty?
                  > >>
                  > >> I'm afraid the $32+ hand-carved horn thumbrings from Three Rivers
                  are a
                  > >> little out of my price range at the moment and I'd like to have a
                  go at
                  > >> making my own (200 arrows a day is leaving my ring finger quite
                  swollen).
                  > >>
                  > >> Wondering if anyone knows of any good online resources with
                  instructions
                  > >> for constructing one's own thumbring.
                  > >>
                  > >> I'm also wondering if any of the bake-able polymer sculpting clay
                  > >> products like Sculpey
                  > >> <http://www.sculpey.com/Products/products_poly_origsculp.htm>or
                  Sculpey
                  > >> Ultra-light, et. al., will work for this. I've thought about
                  trying to
                  > >> file down Schedule 80 or 40 PVC pipe and boiling it to let me
                  shape it
                  > >> (I've used an oven before to straighten schedule 80 pipe when making
                  > >> Irish Flutes before, being careful to vent fumes. I think it
                  softens
                  > >> around 300 degrees F).
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > --
                  >
                  > // Merry
                  >
                  > ----------
                  > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
                  > Shire of Standing Stones; Formerly: Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
                  > Christian M. Cepel --- 573.999.2370 --- Columbia, MO
                  > http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
                  > ICQ:12384980 YIM/AOL:Bramblethorne MSN:Merry@ShireOfS.....
                  >
                  > 'Toirdhealbhach' anglicized Tirloughe (1576), modernly 'Turlough',
                  > pronounced 'TIR' or 'TUR' + 'low', 'logh', 'lock', or 'loch'
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >



                  ------------------------------------

                  --
                  [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                • Steven Fuller
                  Very true. I ve read that, when one s draw and release is *perfect* with a thumb ring, it shouldn t matter what side of the bow you shoot from. I, however, am
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
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                    Very true. I've read that, when one's draw and release is *perfect*
                    with a thumb ring, it shouldn't matter what side of the bow you shoot
                    from. I, however, am far from that level of expertise... :)

                    I did, actually, start using the thumb ring while loading the bow on
                    the left side. It just felt weird. And the arrow kept wanting to lean
                    left, off the bow. When I load on the right side, my index knuckle of
                    my draw hand (right hand) kinda pushes the arrow against my bow,
                    keeping it on there. Works out nicely.

                    --Rhys.

                    --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "George Bottorf"
                    <PLUNKETTARCHER@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Greetings. Not to worry about brass thumb rings. Seems the Romans
                    used bronze rings. Have seen pictures, pretty nice. Some folk also
                    shoot thumbring put arrow on left side of bow. He is top Mongolian
                    archer. Works for him. Trick seems to just do it, not worry who
                    does/doesn't like it! I wonder how a longbow would respond to use of
                    thumbring. HHHMMMMM. Oh well. YIS, Abner de Plunkett. West Kingdom
                    archer/crossbowman
                    >
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Steven Fuller
                    > Sent: Wednesday, June 4, 2008 10:38 AM
                    > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources?
                    Sculpty? - Followup
                    >
                    > Yeah, having shot with a thumb ring for about a year now, I certainly
                    > wouldn't recommend Sculpey for this. Mine is made of brass (not
                    > generally period, though later I will look into making one out of
                    > horn), and it, of course, stands up to the stress of the pull (Kassai
                    > Mongol horse bow, 47# @ 30").
                    >
                    > Regardless of the materials used, you will get MAJOR calluses, if not
                    > blisters, when using it for the first month or two. It does hurt a
                    > bit, but you get used to it, and then the calluses form and it's okay.
                    > But learning to shoot with a thumb ring really redefines how you look
                    > at archery. It's almost as if you have to learn how to shoot all over
                    > again.
                    >
                    > And if you plan on shooting western style, as well, I would recommend
                    > getting a bow to use *just* for thumb ring, and use a different one
                    > for western style (I use a horse bow for Mongolian and then a Martin
                    > X-200 recurve for western). I find it hard to switch between the two
                    > styles while using the same bow. It fries my brain. :) Plus,
                    > traditionally a right-handed archer will load a bow on the RIGHT side
                    > when using a thumb ring.
                    >
                    > -Rhys Cantor.
                    > Great Dark Horde
                    > Kingdom of Atlantia
                    >
                    > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder
                    > Lutre <Merry@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Btw folks. I had already purchased some Scuply before the
                    > > conversation on the topic had gotten underway and I finally was in
                    > front
                    > > of a TV at a friend's house with idle hands a week or two ago and
                    had a
                    > > go. Having never used it before it's possible that I didn't
                    cure/cook
                    > > it properly, but I'm thinking that this isn't the case, and my
                    > > conclusion is that the stuff is useful for decoration only and not
                    > up to
                    > > even a fraction of the stresses involved. Oh well. It looked
                    pretty
                    > > until squeezed it to see if it would take any use and it crushed
                    > like a bug.
                    > >
                    > > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre wrote:
                    > > > Wow. Excellent. I had also forgotten about what's in my own
                    back
                    > > > yard here at MU (Not that one can see them.. they are all in
                    storage)
                    > > > http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/online/thumbring/thumbring.shtml
                    > > >
                    > > > Was surprised to find a wikipedia article... links to a page on
                    > how to
                    > > > make a thumb ring from a billiard ball *boggle*
                    > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thumb_ring
                    > > >
                    > > > Thank you!
                    > > >
                    > > > George Bottorf wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > >> Greetings, Merry. I agree the price of thumb rings is a bit
                    > pricy. A lot of work to make, tho. I went looking for info and found a
                    > bunch of it! I found the best info on Korean archery. Let me show you.
                    > > >> 1- Search: Sugakji thumb rings.
                    > > >> got 3 sites. Wooden thumb rings. Use previous and next to
                    > follow all pages. A lot of info there. All 3 sites good.
                    > > >> 2- Go to ATARN.ORG Look around. Much stuff there.
                    > > >> 3- Korean Traditonal Archery.Org. Ditto.
                    > > >> 4- Go to Leatherwall. Ditto.
                    > > >> 5- Look at Sugakji thumb ring tutorial.
                    > > >> 6-You can use a 3/4" pvc 45 degree elbow to make a thumb ring.
                    > Just a bit of cut and trim. Not real fancy, but mine should work as
                    > soon as I finish sanding it a bit. BTW, the pvc ring is the female
                    > design. The Sugakji is the male version. I will try both and see which
                    > works for me. There, that should hold you for a spell. You might
                    > also want to search just for Thumb Rings. Can't hurt. More info. I
                    > plan to use a low pondage bow to learn the use of the ring! No sense
                    > in hurting yourself at the start. I hope this will be of some small
                    > use for you. YIS, Abner de Plunkett. West Kingdom archer and
                    > crossbowman.
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >> -----Original Message-----
                    > > >> From: 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
                    > > >> Sent: Monday, May 5, 2008 12:03 PM
                    > > >> To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                    > > >> Subject: [SCA-Archery] Makeing one's own thumbring: Resources?
                    > Sculpty?
                    > > >>
                    > > >> I'm afraid the $32+ hand-carved horn thumbrings from Three Rivers
                    > are a
                    > > >> little out of my price range at the moment and I'd like to have a
                    > go at
                    > > >> making my own (200 arrows a day is leaving my ring finger quite
                    > swollen).
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Wondering if anyone knows of any good online resources with
                    > instructions
                    > > >> for constructing one's own thumbring.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> I'm also wondering if any of the bake-able polymer sculpting clay
                    > > >> products like Sculpey
                    > > >> <http://www.sculpey.com/Products/products_poly_origsculp.htm>or
                    > Sculpey
                    > > >> Ultra-light, et. al., will work for this. I've thought about
                    > trying to
                    > > >> file down Schedule 80 or 40 PVC pipe and boiling it to let me
                    > shape it
                    > > >> (I've used an oven before to straighten schedule 80 pipe when
                    making
                    > > >> Irish Flutes before, being careful to vent fumes. I think it
                    > softens
                    > > >> around 300 degrees F).
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > > --
                    > >
                    > > // Merry
                    > >
                    > > ----------
                    > > 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Mirywoder Lutre
                    > > Shire of Standing Stones; Formerly: Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
                    > > Christian M. Cepel --- 573.999.2370 --- Columbia, MO
                    > > http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
                    > > ICQ:12384980 YIM/AOL:Bramblethorne MSN:Merry@ShireOfS.....
                    > >
                    > > 'Toirdhealbhach' anglicized Tirloughe (1576), modernly 'Turlough',
                    > > pronounced 'TIR' or 'TUR' + 'low', 'logh', 'lock', or 'loch'
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > --
                    > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                  • Talmon Parker
                    If You want a clean supply of aluminum, you might want to go to your local welding supply. there you can purchase a small roll of aluminum welding wire. no oil
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      If You want a clean supply of aluminum, you might want to go to your local welding supply. there you can purchase a small roll of aluminum
                      welding wire. no oil or flux. just keep cutting off pieces ,till you get enough to cast with.You can get a harder grade of material also.
                      You can use the rest of the roll to make chain link garb with. Looks bright and shinny, and wont get your clothes all rusty.
                      A large stainless serving spoon taped or wired to a small stick or board will do as a suitable ladle. I you want a side pouring lip. Just bend the spoon with pliers to make a spout.
                      Lots of luck Talmon


                      DER BARON

                      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                      From: eulenhorst@...
                      Date: Tue, 3 Jun 2008 23:20:54 -0700
                      Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Making one's own thumbring: Resources? Sculpty? - Followup




















                      Actually, you wouldn't want an open fire as a heat source for

                      aluminum. It is far too reactive and will result in too many

                      inclusions and slag when exposed to fire. Electric furnaces are used

                      for melting aluminum. This is why it wasn't used commercially prior

                      to the early 20th century.

                      Carolus



                      At 03:10 PM 6/3/2008, you wrote:



                      >I suspect if you were wanting to go the clay-route, you would

                      >probably need some porcelain china grade clay, and firing temps that

                      >are somewhat beyond backyard firing capabilities. Much easier would

                      >be bronze casting, which can be done pretty easily. Aluminum might

                      >work as well, in which case you could do it with a carved piece of

                      >wax, your sculpey for a mold, a ceramic coffee cup for a crucible,

                      >crushed pop cans for an aluminum source, and a campfire as a heat

                      >source. I'm not exactly sure what you would use for a ladle to

                      >scoop out the foam from the top of the molten aluminum before

                      >pouring, but you could probably figure out something.

                      >

                      >Obviously, this is not a safe activity, and you should do it on your

                      >own time and after doing research on safety precations, etc...

                      >

                      >Logan
























                      _________________________________________________________________
                      Instantly invite friends from Facebook and other social networks to join you on Windows Live� Messenger.
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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Talmon Parker
                      If You want a clean supply of aluminum, you might want to go to your local welding supply. there you can purchase a small roll of aluminum welding wire. no oil
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        If You want a clean supply of aluminum, you might want to go to your local welding supply. there you can purchase a small roll of aluminum
                        welding wire. no oil or flux. just keep cutting off pieces ,till you get enough to cast with.You can get a harder grade of material also.
                        You can use the rest of the roll to make chain link garb with. Looks bright and shinny, and wont get your clothes all rusty.
                        A large stainless serving spoon taped or wired to a small stick or board will do as a suitable ladle. I you want a side pouring lip. Just bend the spoon with pliers to make a spout.
                        Lots of luck Talmon


                        DER BARON

                        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                        From: eulenhorst@...
                        Date: Tue, 3 Jun 2008 23:20:54 -0700
                        Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Making one's own thumbring: Resources? Sculpty? - Followup




















                        Actually, you wouldn't want an open fire as a heat source for

                        aluminum. It is far too reactive and will result in too many

                        inclusions and slag when exposed to fire. Electric furnaces are used

                        for melting aluminum. This is why it wasn't used commercially prior

                        to the early 20th century.

                        Carolus



                        At 03:10 PM 6/3/2008, you wrote:



                        >I suspect if you were wanting to go the clay-route, you would

                        >probably need some porcelain china grade clay, and firing temps that

                        >are somewhat beyond backyard firing capabilities. Much easier would

                        >be bronze casting, which can be done pretty easily. Aluminum might

                        >work as well, in which case you could do it with a carved piece of

                        >wax, your sculpey for a mold, a ceramic coffee cup for a crucible,

                        >crushed pop cans for an aluminum source, and a campfire as a heat

                        >source. I'm not exactly sure what you would use for a ladle to

                        >scoop out the foam from the top of the molten aluminum before

                        >pouring, but you could probably figure out something.

                        >

                        >Obviously, this is not a safe activity, and you should do it on your

                        >own time and after doing research on safety precations, etc...

                        >

                        >Logan
























                        _________________________________________________________________
                        Now you can invite friends from Facebook and other groups to join you on Windows Live� Messenger. Add now.
                        https://www.invite2messenger.net/im/?source=TXT_EML_WLH_AddNow_Now

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Joe Klovance
                        Since we are considering a non-period material, aluminium, why not try something completely different; aluminium impregnated epoxy putty. It is quite a tough
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Since we are considering a non-period material, aluminium, why not try something completely different; aluminium impregnated epoxy putty. It is quite a tough material that can be formed into a rough shape around a mandrel then finished using files and sandpaper. It should be tough enough and not involve fire.

                          Joe Klovance
                          _________________________________________________________________
                          Try Chicktionary, a game that tests how many words you can form from the letters given. Find this and more puzzles at Live Search Games!
                          http://g.msn.ca/ca55/207

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Metin Ates
                          Try Delrin (a kind of thermoplastic from DuPond and harder then metal). This is the best materials to make thumbring. Our thumbring-maker Ekrem chooses this
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jun 5, 2008
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                            Try "Delrin" (a kind of thermoplastic from DuPond and harder then metal).
                            This is the best materials to make thumbring. Our thumbring-maker Ekrem
                            chooses this material.
                            Also you should try Plexyglass. These are better from any metal even
                            aluminium.

                            Metina

                            2008/6/5 Joe Klovance <jklovanc@...>:

                            > Since we are considering a non-period material, aluminium, why not try
                            > something completely different; aluminium impregnated epoxy putty. It is
                            > quite a tough material that can be formed into a rough shape around a
                            > mandrel then finished using files and sandpaper. It should be tough enough
                            > and not involve fire.
                            >
                            > Joe Klovance
                            > __________________________________________________________
                            > Try Chicktionary, a game that tests how many words you can form from the
                            > letters given. Find this and more puzzles at Live Search Games!
                            > http://g.msn.ca/ca55/207
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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