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RE: [SCA-Archery] Arrow Weight : a nit pick of sorts

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  • Frederick Fenters
    Dalton beat me to the pick. He is right up to a point, as Fritz noted. I have found that matching the weight of the arrows is less critical than length when
    Message 1 of 35 , Apr 11, 2008
      Dalton beat me to the pick. He is right up to a point, as Fritz noted. I
      have found that matching the weight of the arrows is less critical than
      length when I shoot recurves and that weight seems to be more important when
      shooting my crossbows. I still stand by my statement that most people try
      to point the arrow point (sounds awkward in print, but not when I say it
      aloud) to the target. That's the way I was taught to teach.



      Padraig



      _____

      From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of ICE TIGER
      Sent: Friday, April 11, 2008 12:39 PM
      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Arrow Weight : a nit pick of sorts



      Hello Fritz,
      Since you titled your letter a nit pick....you were commenting on my
      description not Padraig's.
      Dalton.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Fritz <carl.west@comcast. <mailto:carl.west%40comcast.net> net>
      Date: Friday, April 11, 2008 10:34 am
      Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Arrow Weight : a nit pick of sorts
      To: SCA-Archery@ <mailto:SCA-Archery%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com

      > When Frederick Fenters put fingers to keys it was
      > 4/10/08 8:12 AM...
      >
      > >...
      > > 2: Grain weight variance does make a difference, especially at
      > longer> ranges. The lighter arrows will hit a bit higher simply
      > because it takes
      > > less energy for the bow to push that arrow downrange. The
      > result is that the
      > > flight won't decay as quickly.
      >
      > Padraig is entirely correct in his description of the effect.
      > I think clearly stating why this effect is so will help an
      > archer's
      > understanding of what's going on.
      >
      > Gravity works on an object over time*, the more time it has to
      > fall, the
      > further and faster it falls. Without gravity, a thrown or shot
      > object
      > will continue in a straight line. With gravity, the object falls
      > away
      > from that imaginary straight line at a constantly accelerating
      > rate.
      > Hence the arc we see.
      >
      > The longer the object is in flight, the longer gravity has to
      > work on
      > it. Thus at greater distances, where the arrow will take longer
      > to
      > traverse the distance, we need to point our imaginary line higher.
      >
      > If the arrow travels faster leaving the bow, it will take less
      > time to
      > reach the target, and therefore have less time to fall away from
      > that
      > imaginary straight line.
      >
      > Up to a point**, the lighter the arrow, the faster the bow will
      > push it.
      > Therefor the lighter the arrow, the higher it will hit on the
      > target for
      > any particular imaginary line (point of aim).
      >
      > It's not because heavy things fall faster (they don't), but
      > because
      > heavy things tend to leave more slowly*.
      >
      >
      >
      > DO NOT construe this as a suggestion from me that higher arrow
      > speed is
      > necessarily better. Consistency of arrow weight is better. For
      > our
      > purposes gravity is a constant. If your arrows all weigh the
      > same, your
      > bow will launch them at the same speed and that will give
      > gravity the
      > same amount of time to act on them.
      >
      > --
      > Fritz
      > Aut inveniam viam aut faciam.
      >
      >
      >
      > * Ask anyone over 50
      >
      > ** And this is a whole other set of considerations
      >

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kiley Glass
      Gentles, Normally I just lurk, but I couldn t resist, I m so proud: At Fool s War a new Marshall, John Glass, was authorized. There may have been others
      Message 35 of 35 , Apr 15, 2008
        Gentles,

        Normally I just lurk, but I couldn't resist, I'm so proud:

        At Fool's War a new Marshall, John Glass, was authorized. There may have been others authorized as well. I was working in the children's activities area and missed other things going on. John is an experienced archer, but new to participation in the SCA. Giovanni has been working with him on this for a while. Big thanks to Gio, and Hoobah John Glass, new Archery Marshall!

        IS,

        Caileigh

        between 0000-00-00 and 9999-99-99

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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