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Re: About Armguards and such

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  • jameswolfden
    I am going to have to respectfully disagree on this point. Gerald never describes the bow as being short. Most translations have it at rude, uncouth, and
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 12, 2008
      I am going to have to respectfully disagree on this point. Gerald never
      describes the bow as being short. Most translations have it at rude,
      uncouth, and stout. Stout means strong.

      There is little from Gerald's description that lets us know its length
      or how it compares to the more familiar English Longbow except that Elm
      was favoured over Yew.

      Pure speculation on my part but I believe that the Welsh bow was pretty
      much an English Longbow and that's why we don't hear any more about it
      other than Gerald of Wales comments.


      James Wolfden

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Lord Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil
      <archergodwin@...> wrote:
      > This also describes the bows that the Welsh were using, at the time
      of Gerald of
      > Wales writing of his journey across Wales, circa 1100. Where he
      describes the
      > Welsh bow as short, rough and twisted as though made from several
      branches...
      > describing the short elm bow.
      >
      > It is indeed interesting to see the progress of archery in cultures
      who never had
      > contact with other, but yet their progress and day to day life, is
      striking similar.
      >
      > Godwin
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