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Re: Shooting Form

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  • John and Carol Atkins
    Many good points here but the one I noticed and it s effect was commented here by Carolus is holding the draw. Carolus and others pointed out your shoulders
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 13, 2008
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      Many good points here but the one I noticed and it's effect was
      commented here by Carolus is holding the draw. Carolus and others
      pointed out your shoulders seem hunched and your draw/release occurs
      rapidly. Good for speed rounds, not so good for untimed rounds. I
      think the problem here lies in your stance. You appear to be using
      what is called an open stance. In this case, very open stance. That
      is, the basic stance has your toes perpendicular to a line from your
      position to the target. In this position your bow arm is referred to
      as being bone on bone on bone. That is, bow hand anchored to arm,
      anchored to shoulder. In this configuration it takes little arm
      strength to hold and maintain a steady aim prior to release. Now
      also, if you are using the basic stance as you reach your anchor
      point, I tell folks "stick your chest out". This forces your body to
      use your back muscles to hold the draw and takes the strain off your
      arm muscles. It also adds an inch or two to your draw and results in
      faster arrow speed. In the video you appear to have your forward
      foot back off the line from position to target. This position is
      very good for snap shooting where you do not hold the draw but also
      requires the draw to be held primarily by your arm muscles.

      I find for myself when I begin to have shooting issues I actually
      move into a closed stance, wherein my backward foot is behind the
      line from postion to target. This forces my body to "twist" into the
      shooting position but into the bone on bone on bone stance. Think
      like a horse bow archer shooting over his shoulder but not that
      exagerated.

      Edward's point of grabbing the next arrow by the nock I find has
      increased my performance in the speed rounds considerably. Another
      trick I use is to hold two extra arrows in my bow hand fingers. More
      specifically I hold one between my little finger and ring finger and
      a second between my middle finger and index finger, with a third
      arrow on the string. After I shoot the first arrow on the string I
      simply grab the nock of the next arrow in my bow hand and lever it
      onto the string. I get off three arrows in fairly rapid sequence.
      The guy I learned this trick from holds three arrows in his bow hand
      with one on the string.

      Good luck in your venture and most interesting way to get critique on
      techinque,

      cog
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