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Using video to evaluate form (was Shooting Form)

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  • Oakes, George
    I have used video in the past to help me with my form, from shooting a bow, shooting a gun, to bowling. This tool is so valuable and recently so easy to
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 13, 2008
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      I have used video in the past to help me with my form, from shooting a
      bow, shooting a gun, to bowling.
      This tool is so valuable and recently so easy to perform that it is part
      of my daily practice, to bring the camera/videocamera to
      any sport I participate/practice in.

      While bowling, I was having a hard time trying to get my release, and
      spin down. On the web I found various pro bowlers demonstrating
      techniques. One day my daughter was playing with her camera at the
      alley, taking goofy pics of me and her friends, and I asked if she had
      video. (yeah most cameras can take video now dad! geez) So I asked her
      to take video of me bowling both from behind, and from the side, this
      way I could analyize my release and form.

      You would not believe how easy it was to pick out my mistakes, and by
      watching a pro bowl, I was able to identify my problems, and work on
      them. After a while I was able to teach/train my body to bowl with
      proper form, and have increased my bowling average, and have much more
      fun to boot.

      So next time you head out to the range, or to do some other sport, grab
      your camera/video camera/phone whatever u have, and have someone video
      you practicing.
      Then you can see what your body is doing. It so easy to stop and rewind,
      and identify all the problems you are having. Sometimes its even better
      to have someone else look at the video, as we are all kinda of vain, and
      think that our form is OK, having someone else look at it brings in a
      different point of view and they are much better at picking out problems
      or identifing improper form. Obviously show it to someone who knows the
      sport, but you get the idea.

      Peace and Straight shooting

      Just my two cents
      Gavin Kinkade
      Trimaris Archery Ranger

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      -
      I looked at that video several times and never noticed the
      things spoken of until they were pointed out. I see them now. This is
      turning out to be similar to a bow build along, but instead a shooting
      form
      build along..thanks!

      Domingos
    • Will Terada
      If you have access to multiple video the better. Sometimes the angle obscure faults. I ve used that teaching archery at UCDavis ... -- Willie P. Terada Est
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 15, 2008
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        If you have access to multiple video the better. Sometimes the angle
        obscure faults. I've used that teaching archery at UCDavis

        On 2/13/08, Oakes, George <goakes@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have used video in the past to help me with my form, from shooting a
        > bow, shooting a gun, to bowling.
        > This tool is so valuable and recently so easy to perform that it is part
        > of my daily practice, to bring the camera/videocamera to
        > any sport I participate/practice in.
        >
        > While bowling, I was having a hard time trying to get my release, and
        > spin down. On the web I found various pro bowlers demonstrating
        > techniques. One day my daughter was playing with her camera at the
        > alley, taking goofy pics of me and her friends, and I asked if she had
        > video. (yeah most cameras can take video now dad! geez) So I asked her
        > to take video of me bowling both from behind, and from the side, this
        > way I could analyize my release and form.
        >
        > You would not believe how easy it was to pick out my mistakes, and by
        > watching a pro bowl, I was able to identify my problems, and work on
        > them. After a while I was able to teach/train my body to bowl with
        > proper form, and have increased my bowling average, and have much more
        > fun to boot.
        >
        > So next time you head out to the range, or to do some other sport, grab
        > your camera/video camera/phone whatever u have, and have someone video
        > you practicing.
        > Then you can see what your body is doing. It so easy to stop and rewind,
        > and identify all the problems you are having. Sometimes its even better
        > to have someone else look at the video, as we are all kinda of vain, and
        > think that our form is OK, having someone else look at it brings in a
        > different point of view and they are much better at picking out problems
        > or identifing improper form. Obviously show it to someone who knows the
        > sport, but you get the idea.
        >
        > Peace and Straight shooting
        >
        > Just my two cents
        > Gavin Kinkade
        > Trimaris Archery Ranger
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------------------
        > -
        > I looked at that video several times and never noticed the
        > things spoken of until they were pointed out. I see them now. This is
        > turning out to be similar to a bow build along, but instead a shooting
        > form
        > build along..thanks!
        >
        > Domingos
        >
        >



        --
        Willie P. Terada
        Est Sularus oth Mithas
        Ronin Enterprise
        Ronin Blades SoCal


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • peterofmarin
        I agree, the angle of the camera makes all the difference. Angles that show both the fingers and the target are especially helpful.
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 16, 2008
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          I agree, the angle of the camera makes all the difference. Angles that
          show both the fingers and the target are especially helpful.


          http://www.henrythefifth.com
        • Antoinette Rosaura dela Villaverde
          Most coaching manuals suggest taping from 3 directions, in front, back and beside the archer. This allows you to see things from all three angles which gives a
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 16, 2008
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            Most coaching manuals suggest taping from 3 directions, in front, back
            and beside the archer. This allows you to see things from all three
            angles which gives a much clearer indication of what the archer is
            actually doing.
            We use this technique while working with our students and find it
            very helpful for analyzing what the archers errors and strong points
            are.

            Antoinette
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