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Re: Shooting Form

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  • Hobbe
    ... I can t add anything constructive to what has been said by the others, but I do see one thing in your form that bothers me when I see it. I also know that
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 13, 2008
      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Brown" <stickbow@...> wrote:
      > Lord Domingos de Leon CQY, LWM
      > Arenal, Meridies

      I can't add anything constructive to what has been said by the others,
      but I do see one thing in your form that bothers me when I see it. I
      also know that I am often guilty of doing the same...

      Pointing your arrow upwards as you draw. There is really no reason to
      do so and if your fingers slip off the string the arrow will likely
      travel farther than you wish.

      Respectfully,
      Hobbe
    • Scott B. Jaqua
      ... I believe both these problems can be addressed in the Pre-Draw. I have found that using a technique taken from Japanese archery works for me. First hold
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 13, 2008
        Carolus wrote:

        > Second, as you begin to draw,
        > your string arm is very tense and taut. Taken
        > together, these show that you are not using your
        > back to draw. This makes you work too hard with
        > your arm. This also leads to the cock in your
        > wrist.


        Hobbe wrote:

        > I can't add anything constructive to what has been said by the others,
        > but I do see one thing in your form that bothers me when I see it. I
        > also know that I am often guilty of doing the same...
        >
        > Pointing your arrow upwards as you draw. There is really no reason to
        > do so and if your fingers slip off the string the arrow will likely
        > travel farther than you wish.

        I believe both these problems can be addressed in the Pre-Draw. I have
        found that using a technique taken from Japanese archery works for me.
        First hold both your bow hand and string hand slightly above your head
        with the arrow level to the ground (this is called Climbing Mount
        something or another in Japanese archery). Then draw the bow by puling
        both hands down to your draw and anchor position, moving in as straight
        a line as possible. If you do it right, you will feel it in the back
        right off. You can not avoid using you back instead of your arms. It
        also keeps the arrow safely pointed down range the entire time.

        Not that my form is perfect by any means. I still have the pluck, I was
        known for (and some of my students picked up). I keep hoping it's
        consistent enough that is a part of my form almost like a certain
        Olympic archer that used to shoot for ASU. But somehow I don't think so :)

        Njall

        --

        Scott B. Jaqua
        Hagerson Forge, Custom Blades from Historic Patterns
        http://www.hagersonforge.com
      • Bill Brown
        Ok, one step at a time is the only way to move forward. I am going to concentrate first on my release. It is very apparent that I am plucking my string like a
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 13, 2008
          Ok, one step at a time is the only way to move forward. I am going to
          concentrate first on my release. It is very apparent that I am plucking my
          string like a base guitar. Some of this may be from homemade/cheap shooting
          glove trying to clear the fingertips of the glove. I will look at this and
          practice the "let the hand relax, the string will follow" method I "thought"
          I was doing. I looked at that video several times and never noticed the
          things spoken of until they were pointed out. I see them now. This is
          turning out to be similar to a bow build along, but instead a shooting form
          build along..thanks!



          Domingos



          _____

          From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Hobbe
          Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2008 8:39 AM
          To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Shooting Form



          --- In SCA-Archery@ <mailto:SCA-Archery%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com,
          "Bill Brown" <stickbow@...> wrote:
          > Lord Domingos de Leon CQY, LWM
          > Arenal, Meridies

          I can't add anything constructive to what has been said by the others,
          but I do see one thing in your form that bothers me when I see it. I
          also know that I am often guilty of doing the same...

          Pointing your arrow upwards as you draw. There is really no reason to
          do so and if your fingers slip off the string the arrow will likely
          travel farther than you wish.

          Respectfully,
          Hobbe





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John and Carol Atkins
          Many good points here but the one I noticed and it s effect was commented here by Carolus is holding the draw. Carolus and others pointed out your shoulders
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 13, 2008
            Many good points here but the one I noticed and it's effect was
            commented here by Carolus is holding the draw. Carolus and others
            pointed out your shoulders seem hunched and your draw/release occurs
            rapidly. Good for speed rounds, not so good for untimed rounds. I
            think the problem here lies in your stance. You appear to be using
            what is called an open stance. In this case, very open stance. That
            is, the basic stance has your toes perpendicular to a line from your
            position to the target. In this position your bow arm is referred to
            as being bone on bone on bone. That is, bow hand anchored to arm,
            anchored to shoulder. In this configuration it takes little arm
            strength to hold and maintain a steady aim prior to release. Now
            also, if you are using the basic stance as you reach your anchor
            point, I tell folks "stick your chest out". This forces your body to
            use your back muscles to hold the draw and takes the strain off your
            arm muscles. It also adds an inch or two to your draw and results in
            faster arrow speed. In the video you appear to have your forward
            foot back off the line from position to target. This position is
            very good for snap shooting where you do not hold the draw but also
            requires the draw to be held primarily by your arm muscles.

            I find for myself when I begin to have shooting issues I actually
            move into a closed stance, wherein my backward foot is behind the
            line from postion to target. This forces my body to "twist" into the
            shooting position but into the bone on bone on bone stance. Think
            like a horse bow archer shooting over his shoulder but not that
            exagerated.

            Edward's point of grabbing the next arrow by the nock I find has
            increased my performance in the speed rounds considerably. Another
            trick I use is to hold two extra arrows in my bow hand fingers. More
            specifically I hold one between my little finger and ring finger and
            a second between my middle finger and index finger, with a third
            arrow on the string. After I shoot the first arrow on the string I
            simply grab the nock of the next arrow in my bow hand and lever it
            onto the string. I get off three arrows in fairly rapid sequence.
            The guy I learned this trick from holds three arrows in his bow hand
            with one on the string.

            Good luck in your venture and most interesting way to get critique on
            techinque,

            cog
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