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Wood Allergys, was( Re: Bow Staves)

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  • Scott B. Jaqua
    ... Wood allergys can be a major problem. And it s not just so called toxic woods. As a knife maker I work a wide range of woods. but even before I started
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 10, 2008
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      > A note on BW. The dust is somewhat more toxic than most white woods
      > and can
      > cause an allergic reaction in some folks. As a Cabinetmaker I find
      > this can
      > be an issue and always wear my mask when making dust with Black Walnut.
      >
      > Ragi


      Wood allergys can be a major problem. And it's not just so called toxic
      woods. As a knife maker I work a wide range of woods. but even before I
      started down that path I learned the hard lesson on wood allergys. In
      Junior High School I turned a bowl that contained layers of red ceder. I
      had sever respiratory distress. And in the years since it has only
      gotten worse, to the point that it is life threatening. So I have NO red
      ceder in my shop ever. And i make wide detours around it in the wood store.

      But inhalation of the dust isn't the only factor to worry about. Master
      Oso of Caid was making a Padouk knife handle. He had a massive skin
      allergic reaction while sanding the handle to shape. His arms swelled a
      great deal and vary painfully. This attack was a complete shot out of
      the blue. The lesson here is to go slow if you are working a wood that
      you never have before.


      But overall a quality particle mask is a good idea even if you aren't
      allergic to the wood in hand. Any particulate mater entering your nose,
      throat and lungs is bad for you. The body can dispose of a certain
      amount. But it is easy to overload the bodys defenses.

      I use a Dust-B-Gone mask that I bought at Woodcraft. It is not heavy and
      is in fact comfortable to wear. As you are breathing through a mesh, it
      doesn't have to seal like a heavy rubber respirator. It has a wire nose
      bridge to help prevent your breath from passing around the nose. Thus
      preventing fogged safety glasses, (you are wearing safety glasses,
      right?) It filters down to a three micron particle size. And it's
      washable. It's a little pricey, but a great peace of health insurance at
      the price.

      Njall

      Scott B. Jaqua
      Hagerson Forge
    • Will Terada
      Working with any wood can be hazardous and is either being listed or is now listed with California as a know cancer causing agent. Here is one link that list
      Message 2 of 21 , Feb 10, 2008
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        Working with any wood can be hazardous and is either being listed or is now
        listed with California as a know cancer causing agent. Here is one link
        that list some woods and their common reaction.

        *http://tinyurl.com/2hbr2a*


        On 2/10/08, Scott B. Jaqua <hagerson@...> wrote:
        >
        > > A note on BW. The dust is somewhat more toxic than most white woods
        > > and can
        > > cause an allergic reaction in some folks. As a Cabinetmaker I find
        > > this can
        > > be an issue and always wear my mask when making dust with Black Walnut.
        > >
        > > Ragi
        >
        > Wood allergys can be a major problem. And it's not just so called toxic
        > woods. As a knife maker I work a wide range of woods. but even before I
        > started down that path I learned the hard lesson on wood allergys. In
        > Junior High School I turned a bowl that contained layers of red ceder. I
        > had sever respiratory distress. And in the years since it has only
        > gotten worse, to the point that it is life threatening. So I have NO red
        > ceder in my shop ever. And i make wide detours around it in the wood
        > store.
        >
        > But inhalation of the dust isn't the only factor to worry about. Master
        > Oso of Caid was making a Padouk knife handle. He had a massive skin
        > allergic reaction while sanding the handle to shape. His arms swelled a
        > great deal and vary painfully. This attack was a complete shot out of
        > the blue. The lesson here is to go slow if you are working a wood that
        > you never have before.
        >
        > But overall a quality particle mask is a good idea even if you aren't
        > allergic to the wood in hand. Any particulate mater entering your nose,
        > throat and lungs is bad for you. The body can dispose of a certain
        > amount. But it is easy to overload the bodys defenses.
        >
        > I use a Dust-B-Gone mask that I bought at Woodcraft. It is not heavy and
        > is in fact comfortable to wear. As you are breathing through a mesh, it
        > doesn't have to seal like a heavy rubber respirator. It has a wire nose
        > bridge to help prevent your breath from passing around the nose. Thus
        > preventing fogged safety glasses, (you are wearing safety glasses,
        > right?) It filters down to a three micron particle size. And it's
        > washable. It's a little pricey, but a great peace of health insurance at
        > the price.
        >
        > Njall
        >
        > Scott B. Jaqua
        > Hagerson Forge
        >
        >



        --
        Willie P. Terada
        Est Sularus oth Mithas
        Ronin Enterprise
        Ronin Blades SoCal


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Koch
        ... Doesn t just about everything cause cancer in California? I read the list, but didn t see a listing for one of my favorite woods, cornel wood, also known
        Message 3 of 21 , Feb 10, 2008
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          At 01:01 PM 2/10/2008, you wrote:

          >Working with any wood can be hazardous and is either being listed or is now
          >listed with California as a know cancer causing agent. Here is one link
          >that list some woods and their common reaction.
          >
          >*<http://tinyurl.com/2hbr2a*>http://tinyurl.com/2hbr2a*
          Doesn't just about everything cause cancer in California? I read the
          list, but didn't see a listing for one of my favorite woods, cornel
          wood, also known as American dogwood. I actually have a problem with
          oak dust. After sanding oak without good ventilation I get a
          migraine. I now take anti-migraine medication and try to sand oak outdoors.
          >
          Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • logantheboweyder
          Hedge (Osage Orange), the primary North American bow-wood, is well known for being an allergen, and doesn t appear on that list. I m allergic to quite a number
          Message 4 of 21 , Feb 11, 2008
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            Hedge (Osage Orange), the primary North American bow-wood, is well
            known for being an allergen, and doesn't appear on that list.

            I'm allergic to quite a number of things, but haven't reacted to it,
            yet.

            Logan

            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, James Koch <alchem@...> wrote:
            >
            > At 01:01 PM 2/10/2008, you wrote:
            >
            > >Working with any wood can be hazardous and is either being listed
            or is now
            > >listed with California as a know cancer causing agent. Here is
            one link
            > >that list some woods and their common reaction.
            > >
            > >*<http://tinyurl.com/2hbr2a*>http://tinyurl.com/2hbr2a*
            > Doesn't just about everything cause cancer in California? I read
            the
            > list, but didn't see a listing for one of my favorite woods,
            cornel
            > wood, also known as American dogwood. I actually have a problem
            with
            > oak dust. After sanding oak without good ventilation I get a
            > migraine. I now take anti-migraine medication and try to sand oak
            outdoors.
            > >
            > Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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