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Re: New to the list

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  • logantheboweyder
    Good advice, here, Ettiene, except instead of working with a board, go get yourself a hedge stave. Maclura Pomifera, hedgeapple, Osage Orange, bowdark, Bois
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 9, 2008
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      Good advice, here, Ettiene, except instead of working with a board,
      go get yourself a hedge stave. Maclura Pomifera, hedgeapple, Osage
      Orange, bowdark, Bois d'Arc. They are readily available where you
      are from traditional bowyers, and a common farm weed tree. For your
      first, don't bother logging one yourself (It takes too long to dry),
      but spend the $40 to get a stave. They are much easier to work with
      than a hardwood board, and you will be more likely to get a bow that
      is a failure before you get an arrow out of it.

      My 2 cents,
      Logan

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Carl Marten
      <highlander_archer@...> wrote:
      >
      > Borrow , beg or buy the bowyers bible volumes. Start making you
      practice bows out of board staves from the hard wood store. Maple,
      hickory / ash, oak for starters. Remember to back these bows as you
      will almost never get one that has the gain just right. Start making
      six foot bows. Less stress and less chance of one breaking. After
      you make several hot shooters, try yew. I found it very enjoyable to
      work with. I made my first hunting bow out of yew, 80#. My next bow
      and the one I still use for IKACs and hunting is a character bow I
      made out of Osage. 60# and very fast.
      >
      > Have fun, Karl
      >
      > Andy Mueller <runs-with-scissors@...>
      wrote: Hello all -
      > Just a short hello. I am Etienne Le Rouge from the Barony of
      Three Rivers
      > in Calontir.
      > I've been involved in SCA archery for about 10 years off and on,
      most of
      > that with a Martin recurve.
      > Two years ago I began shooting a factory-made laminated longbow,
      and this
      > past summer, a friend and I decided to take on the project of
      building
      > ourselves crossbows.
      > I've built a crossbow loosely based on a period German sporting
      bow, using
      > an ash tiller and Gladius steel prod, and I've shot it with good
      success
      > thus far.
      > My partner in crime is still waiting on some components to finish
      his
      > crossbow, so mine is acting as our shared "test bed" until he can
      finish
      > his.
      >
      > I currently make my own arrows and bowstrings, and at some point
      I'd like to
      > begin the process of learning to make a period style d-section
      longbow -
      > although I have to say that I'm procrastinating on that front.
      The thought
      > of how many failed trail and error attempts, and how many hours
      of practice
      > it will take to become reasonably good at it have me a bit
      intimidated. I
      > would love to make my own yew selfbow, but I figure that taking a
      drawknife
      > to an expensive yew stave isn't wise until one has put in
      some "apprentice"
      > time on lesser (and cheaper) woods.
      >
      > Anyway, I signed on to the list to glean tips, tricks, advice and
      news - and
      > share any pertinent information I may come across.
      > Mostly, I'll probably just lurk, if that's okay. (Better to
      keep a closed
      > mouth and be thought a fool, than to open it and remove all
      doubt.) :-)
      >
      > Cheers -
      > Etienne
      >
      > Etienne LeRouge
      > Barony of Three Rivers
      > Kingdom of Calontir
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > http://www.shofars.us
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
      Mobile. Try it now.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • arturdubh
      It s a trade-off...$40 for an Osage stave -- which if ruined, is a heart-breaker; or a $10 board -- which when ruined is just another piece of firewood (which
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
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        It's a trade-off...$40 for an Osage stave -- which if ruined, is a
        heart-breaker; or a $10 board -- which when ruined is just another
        piece of firewood (which it could have been anyway). I dunno, but I
        would rather spend $10 on a learning experience, even if the wood
        is "harder to work"...... Besides, a usable bow can be made out of a
        pine board, if it's all you can get (and even Yew is a 'soft-wood'
        compared to oak and maple). I've always heard that Osage is a bear to
        work.....

        --Artúr


        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "logantheboweyder"
        <logantheboweyder@...> wrote:
        >
        > Good advice, here, Ettiene, except instead of working with a board,
        > go get yourself a hedge stave. Maclura Pomifera, hedgeapple, Osage
        > Orange, bowdark, Bois d'Arc. They are readily available where you
        > are from traditional bowyers, and a common farm weed tree. For
        your
        > first, don't bother logging one yourself (It takes too long to
        dry),
        > but spend the $40 to get a stave. They are much easier to work
        with
        > than a hardwood board, and you will be more likely to get a bow
        that
        > is a failure before you get an arrow out of it.
        >
        > My 2 cents,
        > Logan
        >
        > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Carl Marten
        > <highlander_archer@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Borrow , beg or buy the bowyers bible volumes. Start making you
        > practice bows out of board staves from the hard wood store. Maple,
        > hickory / ash, oak for starters. Remember to back these bows as
        you
        > will almost never get one that has the gain just right. Start
        making
        > six foot bows. Less stress and less chance of one breaking. After
        > you make several hot shooters, try yew. I found it very enjoyable
        to
        > work with. I made my first hunting bow out of yew, 80#. My next bow
        > and the one I still use for IKACs and hunting is a character bow I
        > made out of Osage. 60# and very fast.
        > >
        > > Have fun, Karl
        > >
        > > Andy Mueller <runs-with-scissors@>
        > wrote: Hello all -
        > > Just a short hello. I am Etienne Le Rouge from the Barony of
        > Three Rivers
        > > in Calontir.
        > > I've been involved in SCA archery for about 10 years off and on,
        > most of
        > > that with a Martin recurve.
        > > Two years ago I began shooting a factory-made laminated longbow,
        > and this
        > > past summer, a friend and I decided to take on the project of
        > building
        > > ourselves crossbows.
        > > I've built a crossbow loosely based on a period German sporting
        > bow, using
        > > an ash tiller and Gladius steel prod, and I've shot it with good
        > success
        > > thus far.
        > > My partner in crime is still waiting on some components to
        finish
        > his
        > > crossbow, so mine is acting as our shared "test bed" until he
        can
        > finish
        > > his.
        > >
        > > I currently make my own arrows and bowstrings, and at some point
        > I'd like to
        > > begin the process of learning to make a period style d-section
        > longbow -
        > > although I have to say that I'm procrastinating on that front.
        > The thought
        > > of how many failed trail and error attempts, and how many hours
        > of practice
        > > it will take to become reasonably good at it have me a bit
        > intimidated. I
        > > would love to make my own yew selfbow, but I figure that taking
        a
        > drawknife
        > > to an expensive yew stave isn't wise until one has put in
        > some "apprentice"
        > > time on lesser (and cheaper) woods.
        > >
        > > Anyway, I signed on to the list to glean tips, tricks, advice
        and
        > news - and
        > > share any pertinent information I may come across.
        > > Mostly, I'll probably just lurk, if that's okay. (Better to
        > keep a closed
        > > mouth and be thought a fool, than to open it and remove all
        > doubt.) :-)
        > >
        > > Cheers -
        > > Etienne
        > >
        > > Etienne LeRouge
        > > Barony of Three Rivers
        > > Kingdom of Calontir
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > http://www.shofars.us
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
        > > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
        > Mobile. Try it now.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • THL Caedmon Wilson
        This past summer, I made a some practice attempts at making a longbow. Instead of going to the big box store to buy the wood, I went out to my parent s land
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
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          This past summer, I made a some practice attempts at making a longbow.
          Instead of going to the big box store to buy the wood, I went out to
          my parent's land and scouted a few 3" diameter trees. I decided to do
          the method of bow making from the Bowyer's Bible where you work the
          bow while the cut is still fresh and wet. My tree identification
          scores are poor, so I cannot tell you what kind of the wood it was.

          The end products looked like bows, but each failed due to flaws in the
          wood. It was more for the practice of tillering a bow, so I did not
          feel too bad. This coming summer, I will probably try again. It made
          for a pleasant hour out in the garage.

          -Caedmon
        • Oakes, George
          All I can say about making a bow that can help you is this. Go Slow! If you think your going slow enough, slow down even more. Take a couple whacks at the wood
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
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            All I can say about making a bow that can help you is this.

            Go Slow!

            If you think your going slow enough, slow down even more.

            Take a couple whacks at the wood with whatever your using to scrape down
            the limbs, rasp, file, cabinet scraper, and check it on the tillering
            stick. Then go back and take a few more whacks. Check it again, repeat
            as nessesary

            Wood is very suseptable to the world and the environment around it, Keep
            a close eye on the grain, growth rings, and any possible knots. Dont cut
            out the knots, leave them in, go around them, and work them into the
            bow.

            Good luck on your future bows.

            Peace
            Gavin

            ________________________________

            From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of THL Caedmon Wilson
            Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 8:01 AM
            To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: New to the list



            This past summer, I made a some practice attempts at making a longbow.
            Instead of going to the big box store to buy the wood, I went out to
            my parent's land and scouted a few 3" diameter trees. I decided to do
            the method of bow making from the Bowyer's Bible where you work the
            bow while the cut is still fresh and wet. My tree identification
            scores are poor, so I cannot tell you what kind of the wood it was.

            The end products looked like bows, but each failed due to flaws in the
            wood. It was more for the practice of tillering a bow, so I did not
            feel too bad. This coming summer, I will probably try again. It made
            for a pleasant hour out in the garage.

            -Caedmon





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Dan Lind
            Okay, total newb question. How does one work a knot into a bow? No doubt the finished bow looks pretty cool, but how does the bowyer determine that the bow
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
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              Okay, total newb question. How does one work a knot into a bow? No doubt
              the finished bow looks pretty cool, but how does the bowyer determine that
              the bow will not explode when drawn? Wouldn't the knot form either a hard
              or weak spot which could shatter when normal force is applied?

              Christian


              On 1/11/08, Oakes, George <goakes@... > wrote:
              >
              > Dont cut out the knots, leave them in, go around them, and work them
              > into the bow.
              > .
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Richard Yeager
              This is some good advice. At the risk of upsetting others i would disagree with some of hte other advice, at least at first. Wait until you have tried to
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                This is some good advice. At the risk of upsetting others i would disagree with some of hte other advice, at least at first. Wait until you have tried to make a couple f bows BEFORE going through the Boywer's Bibles. They really are not intended for "I've never done this before and am looking for a good how-to source" They are great books which are much more useful AFTER you have started making bows. Threy are a number of on-line guides for people just beginning that offer a better place to start (assuming you cannot find a bowyer to help at first). The Paleo-planet site also has some useful articles archived (and some of the authors of "the Bible" post there regularly). I would start with a board instead of a log. If you can, find one of the specialty lumber houses and try for a nice piece of Hickory or pecan. For about $15 to $20, you should be able to find a piece that will produce 5 or more staves to practice on. If you are lucky, they will have quarter sawn
                stock. Barring hickory, some nice ash, hard maple, or red oak are also good choices. If you have to go to big box, find the red oak instead of the common pine.

                Once you have it, as suggested, go slow. You can always remove more wood. You can't put Any back

                Good Luck and have fun. Don't get discouraged. Even those of us that make these things commercially have a fair number of staves that never make it to finished bow.

                Cuan mac Niall

                "Oakes, George" <goakes@...> wrote: All I can say about making a bow that can help you is this.

                Go Slow!

                If you think your going slow enough, slow down even more.

                Take a couple whacks at the wood with whatever your using to scrape down
                the limbs, rasp, file, cabinet scraper, and check it on the tillering
                stick. Then go back and take a few more whacks. Check it again, repeat
                as nessesary

                Wood is very suseptable to the world and the environment around it, Keep
                a close eye on the grain, growth rings, and any possible knots. Dont cut
                out the knots, leave them in, go around them, and work them into the
                bow.

                Good luck on your future bows.

                Peace
                Gavin

                ________________________________

                From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com]
                On Behalf Of THL Caedmon Wilson
                Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 8:01 AM
                To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: New to the list

                This past summer, I made a some practice attempts at making a longbow.
                Instead of going to the big box store to buy the wood, I went out to
                my parent's land and scouted a few 3" diameter trees. I decided to do
                the method of bow making from the Bowyer's Bible where you work the
                bow while the cut is still fresh and wet. My tree identification
                scores are poor, so I cannot tell you what kind of the wood it was.

                The end products looked like bows, but each failed due to flaws in the
                wood. It was more for the practice of tillering a bow, so I did not
                feel too bad. This coming summer, I will probably try again. It made
                for a pleasant hour out in the garage.

                -Caedmon

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                ---------------------------------
                Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • morgan wolf
                I have to slightly disagree with Cuan, there are parts of the Bowyer s Bibles that *are* written for the first timer, but he is right that the vast majority of
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
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                  I have to slightly disagree with Cuan, there are parts of the Bowyer's Bibles that *are* written for the first timer, but he is right that the vast majority of the information is written for an experienced bowyer/woodworker, so spending $50-$70 for the set before you've even tried to make a bow might not be the best plan. Check out http://www.xsorbit4.com/users/buildabow/index.cgi
                  for some great tips and build-alongs, as well as some really great "oops" info, so you can learn from the mistakes of others.

                  As for wood, i will echo the red oak sentiment, and I've found a few nice pieces at my local Lowes, just remember to look for good straight grain, no knots, and wide growth rings. A 72" 1"x2" makes a nice flatbow.

                  Morgan



                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Richard Yeager <chuymonstre@...>
                  To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 11:20:57 AM
                  Subject: RE: [SCA-Archery] Re: New to the list

                  This is some good advice. At the risk of upsetting others i would disagree with some of hte other advice, at least at first. Wait until you have tried to make a couple f bows BEFORE going through the Boywer's Bibles. They really are not intended for "I've never done this before and am looking for a good how-to source" They are great books which are much more useful AFTER you have started making bows. Threy are a number of on-line guides for people just beginning that offer a better place to start (assuming you cannot find a bowyer to help at first). The Paleo-planet site also has some useful articles archived (and some of the authors of "the Bible" post there regularly). I would start with a board instead of a log. If you can, find one of the specialty lumber houses and try for a nice piece of Hickory or pecan. For about $15 to $20, you should be able to find a piece that will produce 5 or more staves to practice on. If you are lucky, they will have
                  quarter sawn
                  stock. Barring hickory, some nice ash, hard maple, or red oak are also good choices. If you have to go to big box, find the red oak instead of the common pine.

                  Once you have it, as suggested, go slow. You can always remove more wood. You can't put Any back

                  Good Luck and have fun. Don't get discouraged. Even those of us that make these things commercially have a fair number of staves that never make it to finished bow.

                  Cuan mac Niall

                  "Oakes, George" <goakes@tiresplus. com> wrote: All I can say about making a bow that can help you is this.

                  Go Slow!

                  If you think your going slow enough, slow down even more.

                  Take a couple whacks at the wood with whatever your using to scrape down
                  the limbs, rasp, file, cabinet scraper, and check it on the tillering
                  stick. Then go back and take a few more whacks. Check it again, repeat
                  as nessesary

                  Wood is very suseptable to the world and the environment around it, Keep
                  a close eye on the grain, growth rings, and any possible knots. Dont cut
                  out the knots, leave them in, go around them, and work them into the
                  bow.

                  Good luck on your future bows.

                  Peace
                  Gavin

                  ____________ _________ _________ __

                  From: SCA-Archery@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:SCA-Archery@ yahoogroups. com]
                  On Behalf Of THL Caedmon Wilson
                  Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 8:01 AM
                  To: SCA-Archery@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: New to the list

                  This past summer, I made a some practice attempts at making a longbow.
                  Instead of going to the big box store to buy the wood, I went out to
                  my parent's land and scouted a few 3" diameter trees. I decided to do
                  the method of bow making from the Bowyer's Bible where you work the
                  bow while the cut is still fresh and wet. My tree identification
                  scores are poor, so I cannot tell you what kind of the wood it was.

                  The end products looked like bows, but each failed due to flaws in the
                  wood. It was more for the practice of tillering a bow, so I did not
                  feel too bad. This coming summer, I will probably try again. It made
                  for a pleasant hour out in the garage.

                  -Caedmon

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  ------------ --------- --------- ---
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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • morgan wolf
                  Trial and error- you build it, sometimes the little knot makes for interesting character , sometimes the limb snaps in your face when you draw it. Morgan ...
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
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                    Trial and error- you build it, sometimes the little knot makes for interesting "character", sometimes the limb snaps in your face when you draw it.

                    Morgan



                    ----- Original Message ----
                    From: Dan Lind <darthnapster@...>
                    To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 10:57:19 AM
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: New to the list

                    Okay, total newb question. How does one work a knot into a bow? No doubt
                    the finished bow looks pretty cool, but how does the bowyer determine that
                    the bow will not explode when drawn? Wouldn't the knot form either a hard
                    or weak spot which could shatter when normal force is applied?

                    Christian

                    On 1/11/08, Oakes, George <goakes@tiresplus. com > wrote:
                    >
                    > Dont cut out the knots, leave them in, go around them, and work them
                    > into the bow.
                    > .
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    ____________________________________________________________________________________
                    Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
                    http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • logantheboweyder
                    YOu assume it will be a weak spot, and leave extra wood around it, enough that the bow has extra strength there. Logan ... No doubt ... determine that ...
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
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                      YOu assume it will be a weak spot, and leave extra wood around it,
                      enough that the bow has extra strength there.

                      Logan

                      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Dan Lind" <darthnapster@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Okay, total newb question. How does one work a knot into a bow?
                      No doubt
                      > the finished bow looks pretty cool, but how does the bowyer
                      determine that
                      > the bow will not explode when drawn? Wouldn't the knot form
                      either a hard
                      > or weak spot which could shatter when normal force is applied?
                      >
                      > Christian
                      >
                      >
                      > On 1/11/08, Oakes, George <goakes@... > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Dont cut out the knots, leave them in, go around them, and
                      work them
                      > > into the bow.
                      > > .
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Dan Lind
                      Thank you ... -- Einarr the Christian Son of Håkon, GPA Côte du Ciel Artemisia (MKA Dan Lind) [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jan 11, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thank you

                        On 1/11/08, logantheboweyder <logantheboweyder@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > YOu assume it will be a weak spot, and leave extra wood around it,
                        > enough that the bow has extra strength there.
                        >
                        > Logan
                        >
                        > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com <SCA-Archery%40yahoogroups.com>, "Dan
                        > Lind" <darthnapster@...>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Okay, total newb question. How does one work a knot into a bow?
                        > No doubt
                        > > the finished bow looks pretty cool, but how does the bowyer
                        > determine that
                        > > the bow will not explode when drawn? Wouldn't the knot form
                        > either a hard
                        > > or weak spot which could shatter when normal force is applied?
                        > >
                        > > Christian
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > On 1/11/08, Oakes, George <goakes@... > wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Dont cut out the knots, leave them in, go around them, and
                        > work them
                        > > > into the bow.
                        > > > .
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >



                        --
                        Einarr the Christian Son of Håkon, GPA
                        Côte du Ciel
                        Artemisia
                        (MKA Dan Lind)


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • zipper51em
                        Greetings to the list! I hope to make some new friends! Please allow me to introduce myself. My name is Omelan and I reside in the East Kingdom. I have been
                        Message 11 of 16 , Aug 29, 2009
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                          Greetings to the list! I hope to make some new friends! Please allow me to introduce myself. My name is Omelan and I reside in the East Kingdom. I have been an archer for many years, the last 18 in the SCA.
                          My longbow was made by Jay St. Charles (Pacific Yew Inc) Hickory backed Ipe, horn tipped, 76 inches long with a draw weight of 65lbs.(my baby) I shoot Poplar arrows with cow horn reinforced self nocks. I like to thread wrap the fletch with linen and coat the wraps with a mixture of hide glue and home grown verdigris. Brass points glued and pined. I don't use a quiver much but my arrow bag is like those illustrated in the book English Longbowman 1330-1515. On occasion I teach arrow making / building and bowstrings.
                          Thank You for allowing me to join this wonderful list!

                          Lord Omelan
                          Barony of Dragonship Haven
                          Archery Marshal
                          Capt. Of the Archers
                          AOA, OM, OSC
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