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Re: [SCA-Archery] Rem Acu

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  • James of the Lake
    Indeed. Apparently a fairly common Latin phrase. My Cassell s has it (under acus , a needle, bodkin) as acu rem tangere -- to hit the nail on the head .
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 5, 2007
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      Indeed. Apparently a fairly common Latin phrase. My Cassell's has
      it (under "acus", a needle, bodkin) as "acu rem tangere" -- "to hit
      the nail on the head".

      I've just been reading Plautus as it happens. I'll have to search
      for in which of his plays the phrase you have quoted occurs.

      Thanks for posting this!

      James
      jotl@...


      On Dec 5, 2007, at 6:08 PM, Eadric Anstapa wrote:

      >
      > E. Cobham Brewer 1810--1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
      >
      > *Rem Acu.
      > * You have hit the mark; you have hit the nail on the head. /Rem acu
      > tetigisti/ (Plautus). A phrase in archery, meaning, You have hit the
      > white, or the bull's-eye.
      > "'/Rem acu/ once again,' said Sir Piercie."---/The Monastery,/
      > chap. xvi
      >
      > Evidently the Latin /Rem acu tetigisti/ means most closely 'You have
      > touched it exactly' or 'You have touched it sharply' or 'You have
      > touched it with a needle' and used used the same way we might today
      > use
      > "You have hit the nail on the head".
      >
      > Evidently there was a time in English archery circles "Rem Acu" was
      > the equivalent of a fencer crying "touché"
      >
      > -EA
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • John edgerton
      Since it says to hit the white .... it would likely to have been in use before the gold center became common. So it could well be in period for SCAS
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 5, 2007
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        Since it says to "hit the white ...." it would likely to have been
        in use before the gold center became common. So it could well be in
        period for SCAS archery usage.

        Thanks for posting this.

        Jon

        On Dec 5, 2007, at 6:08 PM, Eadric Anstapa wrote:

        >
        > E. Cobham Brewer 1810--1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
        >
        > *Rem Acu.
        > * You have hit the mark; you have hit the nail on the head. /Rem acu
        > tetigisti/ (Plautus). A phrase in archery, meaning, You have hit the
        > white, or the bull's-eye.
        > "'/Rem acu/ once again,' said Sir Piercie."---/The Monastery,/
        > chap. xvi
        >
        > Evidently the Latin /Rem acu tetigisti/ means most closely 'You have
        > touched it exactly' or 'You have touched it sharply' or 'You have
        > touched it with a needle' and used used the same way we might today
        > use
        > "You have hit the nail on the head".
        >
        > Evidently there was a time in English archery circles "Rem Acu" was
        > the equivalent of a fencer crying "touché"
        >
        > -EA
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Eadric Anstapa
        ... I think it s a phrase we SCA Archers should try and revive. ... The phrase is Rem acu tetigisti. is commonly attributed to the comedy Rudens by Plautus
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 5, 2007
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          James of the Lake wrote:
          > Indeed. Apparently a fairly common Latin phrase. My Cassell's has
          > it (under "acus", a needle, bodkin) as "acu rem tangere" -- "to hit
          > the nail on the head".
          >

          I think it's a phrase we SCA Archers should try and revive.
          > I've just been reading Plautus as it happens. I'll have to search
          > for in which of his plays the phrase you have quoted occurs.
          >

          The phrase is "Rem acu tetigisti." is commonly attributed to the comedy
          "Rudens" by Plautus

          I find "Tetigisti acu" in Rudens, Act V, Scene 2, line 19
          http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0046&query=scene%3D%2328

          Evidently "rem acu tetigisti" also appears in a 1528 work by theologian
          Erasmus.
          http://big.chez.com/asklepios/erasmus/pronuntiatione.htm

          I cant find were it is first attributed as a phrase used by archers.
          The Brewers first edition relates "Rem Acu" as a phrase use by archers.

          The RAF 10th Squadron has "Rem acu tangere" (To hit the mark) as their
          motto on a badge granted by HRH King George VI in September 1937. The
          badge and motto was reportedly designed by Wg Cdr Whitelock while
          watching archery practice in Oxford. The badge sports a winged arrow as
          Whitelock thought that the bombs of his era were to his army the
          equivalent of the medieval war arrow to the armies of the longbow
          period. Evidently the 10th Squadron was disbanded in 2005.

          Regards,

          -EA
        • James of the Lake
          Yeah. I just found it there myself, the Tetigisti acu. phrase, as offered at http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/plautus/rudens.shtml on line 1306. Peter L.
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 5, 2007
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            Yeah. I just found it there myself, the "Tetigisti acu." phrase, as
            offered at

            http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/plautus/rudens.shtml

            on line 1306.

            Peter L. Smith's translation also offers the phrase as "You've the
            nail Upon the head."

            Thanks much for the 16thC reference, too.

            James
            jotl@...


            On Dec 5, 2007, at 6:49 PM, Eadric Anstapa wrote:

            > James of the Lake wrote:
            >> Indeed. Apparently a fairly common Latin phrase. My Cassell's has
            >> it (under "acus", a needle, bodkin) as "acu rem tangere" -- "to hit
            >> the nail on the head".
            >>
            >
            > I think it's a phrase we SCA Archers should try and revive.
            >> I've just been reading Plautus as it happens. I'll have to search
            >> for in which of his plays the phrase you have quoted occurs.
            >>
            >
            > The phrase is "Rem acu tetigisti." is commonly attributed to the
            > comedy
            > "Rudens" by Plautus
            >
            > I find "Tetigisti acu" in Rudens, Act V, Scene 2, line 19
            > http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%
            > 3A1999.02.0046&query=scene%3D%2328
            >
            > Evidently "rem acu tetigisti" also appears in a 1528 work by
            > theologian
            > Erasmus.
            > http://big.chez.com/asklepios/erasmus/pronuntiatione.htm
            >
            > I cant find were it is first attributed as a phrase used by archers.
            > The Brewers first edition relates "Rem Acu" as a phrase use by
            > archers.
            >
            > The RAF 10th Squadron has "Rem acu tangere" (To hit the mark) as their
            > motto on a badge granted by HRH King George VI in September 1937. The
            > badge and motto was reportedly designed by Wg Cdr Whitelock while
            > watching archery practice in Oxford. The badge sports a winged
            > arrow as
            > Whitelock thought that the bombs of his era were to his army the
            > equivalent of the medieval war arrow to the armies of the longbow
            > period. Evidently the 10th Squadron was disbanded in 2005.
            >
            > Regards,
            >
            > -EA
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • James of the Lake
            You ve *hit* the nail Upon the head. of course. James
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 5, 2007
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              "You've *hit* the nail Upon the head." of course.

              James


              On Dec 5, 2007, at 7:04 PM, James of the Lake wrote:
              >
              >
              > Peter L. Smith's translation also offers the phrase as "You've the
              > nail Upon the head."
              >
              >
              > James
              > jotl@...
              >
            • John edgerton
              I posted the information on rem acu to the Society Of Archer- Antiquaries Forum and asked if anyone knew when it was used for archery. I think it would be
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 5, 2007
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                I posted the information on "rem acu" to the Society Of Archer-
                Antiquaries Forum and asked if anyone knew when it was used for
                archery. I think it would be great if it had period usage. But,
                even if it does not. I think it should be introduced into our SCA
                archery vocabulary. It could have been used in period by anyone that
                read Plautus.

                Jon

                On Dec 5, 2007, at 6:08 PM, Eadric Anstapa wrote:

                >
                > E. Cobham Brewer 1810--1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
                >
                > *Rem Acu.
                > * You have hit the mark; you have hit the nail on the head. /Rem acu
                > tetigisti/ (Plautus). A phrase in archery, meaning, You have hit the
                > white, or the bull's-eye.
                > "'/Rem acu/ once again,' said Sir Piercie."---/The Monastery,/
                > chap. xvi
                >
                > Evidently the Latin /Rem acu tetigisti/ means most closely 'You have
                > touched it exactly' or 'You have touched it sharply' or 'You have
                > touched it with a needle' and used used the same way we might today
                > use
                > "You have hit the nail on the head".
                >
                > Evidently there was a time in English archery circles "Rem Acu" was
                > the equivalent of a fencer crying "touché"
                >
                > -EA
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • James of the Lake
                I thought the phrase might appear in Shakespeare somewhere, but Bartleby.com has 1) 2091. John Fletcher. 1579-1625. Bartlett, John, comp. 1919. Familiar
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 5, 2007
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                  I thought the phrase might appear in Shakespeare somewhere, but
                  Bartleby.com has


                  1) 2091. John Fletcher. 1579-1625. Bartlett, John, comp. 1919.
                  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.
                  ...NUMBER: 2091 AUTHOR: John Fletcher (1579–1625) QUOTATION: Hit the
                  nail on the head. ATTRIBUTION: Love s Cure. Act ii. Sc. 1....
                  2) 9233. François Rabelais. c. 1490-1553. Bartlett, John, comp. 1919.
                  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.
                  ...NUMBER: 9233 AUTHOR: François Rabelais (c. 1490–1553) QUOTATION:
                  You have there hit the nail on the head. 1 ATTRIBUTION: Works. Book
                  iii. Chap. xxxiv. Note 1. See...

                  James

                  jotl@...

                  On Dec 5, 2007, at 9:39 PM, John edgerton wrote:

                  > I posted the information on "rem acu" to the Society Of Archer-
                  > Antiquaries Forum and asked if anyone knew when it was used for
                  > archery. I think it would be great if it had period usage. But,
                  > even if it does not. I think it should be introduced into our SCA
                  > archery vocabulary. It could have been used in period by anyone that
                  > read Plautus.
                  >
                  > Jon
                  >
                  > On Dec 5, 2007, at 6:08 PM, Eadric Anstapa wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >> E. Cobham Brewer 1810--1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
                  >>
                  >> *Rem Acu.
                  >> * You have hit the mark; you have hit the nail on the head. /Rem acu
                  >> tetigisti/ (Plautus). A phrase in archery, meaning, You have hit the
                  >> white, or the bull's-eye.
                  >> "'/Rem acu/ once again,' said Sir Piercie."---/The Monastery,/
                  >> chap. xvi
                  >>
                  >> Evidently the Latin /Rem acu tetigisti/ means most closely 'You have
                  >> touched it exactly' or 'You have touched it sharply' or 'You have
                  >> touched it with a needle' and used used the same way we might today
                  >> use
                  >> "You have hit the nail on the head".
                  >>
                  >> Evidently there was a time in English archery circles "Rem Acu" was
                  >> the equivalent of a fencer crying "touché"
                  >>
                  >> -EA
                  >>
                • Fritz
                  When John edgerton put fingers to keys it was 12/6/07 12:39 AM... ... They had it, they might have used it. I like it, a nice change from: If they had had
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 6, 2007
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                    When John edgerton put fingers to keys it was 12/6/07 12:39 AM...

                    > I posted the information on "rem acu" to the Society Of Archer-
                    > Antiquaries Forum and asked if anyone knew when it was used for
                    > archery. I think it would be great if it had period usage. But,
                    > even if it does not. I think it should be introduced into our SCA
                    > archery vocabulary. It could have been used in period by anyone that
                    > read Plautus.


                    "They had it, they might have used it."
                    I like it, a nice change from: "If they had had it, they'd have used it."

                    :)

                    --
                    Fritz
                    Aut inveniam viam aut faciam.
                  • J. Hughes
                    Ok. An archer reading Pautus gets my attention. I am working on comedia right now and have come accross a woodcut of Brugel showing a comedia troop with a
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 6, 2007
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                      Ok. An archer reading Pautus gets my attention. I am working on comedia right now and have come accross a woodcut of Brugel showing a comedia troop with a crossbowman on stage. I would give almost anything to know more about what was going on.

                      Charles O'Connor



                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: James of the Lake <jotl@...>
                      To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 9:25:44 PM
                      Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Rem Acu

                      Indeed. Apparently a fairly common Latin phrase. My Cassell's has
                      it (under "acus", a needle, bodkin) as "acu rem tangere" -- "to hit
                      the nail on the head".

                      I've just been reading Plautus as it happens. I'll have to search
                      for in which of his plays the phrase you have quoted occurs.

                      Thanks for posting this!

                      James
                      jotl@ridgecrest. ca.us

                      On Dec 5, 2007, at 6:08 PM, Eadric Anstapa wrote:

                      >
                      > E. Cobham Brewer 1810--1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
                      >
                      > *Rem Acu.
                      > * You have hit the mark; you have hit the nail on the head. /Rem acu
                      > tetigisti/ (Plautus). A phrase in archery, meaning, You have hit the
                      > white, or the bull's-eye.
                      > "'/Rem acu/ once again,' said Sir Piercie."--- /The Monastery,/
                      > chap. xvi
                      >
                      > Evidently the Latin /Rem acu tetigisti/ means most closely 'You have
                      > touched it exactly' or 'You have touched it sharply' or 'You have
                      > touched it with a needle' and used used the same way we might today
                      > use
                      > "You have hit the nail on the head".
                      >
                      > Evidently there was a time in English archery circles "Rem Acu" was
                      > the equivalent of a fencer crying "touché"
                      >
                      > -EA
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --
                      > [Email to SCA-Archery- unsubscribe@ yahoogroups. com to leave this list]
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >





                      ____________________________________________________________________________________
                      Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
                      http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • blkknighti@aol.com
                      Is it possible to upload that woodcut in the files section? Richard ... ************************************** Check out AOL s list of 2007 s hottest products.
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 6, 2007
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                        Is it possible to upload that woodcut in the files section?
                        Richard

                        In a message dated 12/6/07 9:46:38 AM, jphughessr@... writes:


                        > Ok. An archer reading Pautus gets my attention. I am working on comedia
                        > right now and have come accross a woodcut of Brugel showing a comedia troop with
                        > a crossbowman on stage. I would give almost anything to know more about what
                        > was going on.
                        >
                        > Charles O'Connor
                        >
                        >




                        **************************************
                        Check out AOL's list of 2007's hottest
                        products.

                        (http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?NCID=aoltop00030000000001)


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • John edgerton
                        The crossbow man was a special assistant to the director. If an actor blew their lines, he shot them. Jon ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
                        Message 11 of 13 , Dec 6, 2007
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                          The crossbow man was a special assistant to the director. If an
                          actor blew their lines, he shot them.

                          Jon

                          On Dec 6, 2007, at 6:46 AM, J. Hughes wrote:

                          > Ok. An archer reading Pautus gets my attention. I am working on
                          > comedia right now and have come accross a woodcut of Brugel showing
                          > a comedia troop with a crossbowman on stage. I would give almost
                          > anything to know more about what was going on.
                          >
                          > Charles O'Connor


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Fritz
                          When J. Hughes put fingers to keys it was 12/6/07 9:46 AM... ... And I play with i Sebastiani and am wildly curious about this woodcut. -- Fritz Aut inveniam
                          Message 12 of 13 , Dec 6, 2007
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                            When J. Hughes put fingers to keys it was 12/6/07 9:46 AM...

                            > Ok. An archer reading Pautus gets my attention. I am working on
                            > comedia right now and have come accross a woodcut of Brugel showing a
                            > comedia troop with a crossbowman on stage. I would give almost
                            > anything to know more about what was going on.
                            >
                            > Charles O'Connor

                            And I play with i Sebastiani and am wildly curious about this woodcut.


                            --
                            Fritz
                            Aut inveniam viam aut faciam.
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