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Bowstring finger pads.

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  • 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
    Actually, they are marketed as No-Glove Finger Savers ... http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402 This last weekend at King s Company of
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 17, 2007
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      Actually, they are marketed as "No-Glove Finger Savers"...
      http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402

      This last weekend at King's Company of Archers (Calontir) a young
      Fyrdman next to me on the line was shooting with these on his string
      (and whipping the holy pants off me score wise... he was very skilled!!)
      and I have to say, that they look super but before I run out and order a
      pair I've gotta ask on three fronts: 1) legality, 2) periodness, 3)
      practicality.

      1. Legality:

      How are these regarded both according to the rules and by other archers.

      2. Periodness:

      I could very well see someone trying to pad their string just as a
      personal innovation, but is there any evidence of it being done? I
      could see this being done in casual and sport archery but not in combat
      or hunting archery where the perishable and critical string is something
      you keep protected in an oil packet and only bring out and tension when
      you're going to be using it. I've no evidence to back this up, but it
      would seem something that might come about as a competitive archery
      innovation among those not trying to put a meal on the table or doing
      their required practice for battle readiness, and also, as such,
      something would likely be a later innovation. Just speculation...
      please correct me if you know the facts. I'd like to learn.

      3. Practicality:

      Do any of you have opinions on their actual use.. I.e., do they hold
      up well? Are they sufficient enough that a glove or tab may be
      eliminated entirely? I assume they roll off nicely, but does this make
      them prone to 'slips' or unintentional loosing of an arrow?

      Thanks for any feedback.

      --

      // Merry

      ----------
      "Merry" Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
      Shire of Standing Stones, University of Missouri at Columbia
      Formerly known as Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
      Mundanely known as Christian M. Cepel
      http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/

      'Toirdhealbhach' or modernly Anglicized 'Turlough'
      Is pronounced as 'tur-low' or tur-logh'
    • Carolus
      1. Legality is dependent on location. In Caid one can have only one nocking point on a string. As these fit above and below the arrow nock they are
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 17, 2007
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        1. Legality is dependent on location. In Caid one can have only one
        nocking point on a string. As these fit above and below the arrow
        nock they are questionable. The intent of the rule was to prevent
        more than one location to nock the arrow but some interpret it to
        prevent the use of over and under nocking points. Your locality may
        be different.

        2. Period they aren't. There is NO evidence whatsoever that
        anything even slightly resembling these were used in period and in
        recorded modern archery they weren't seen before the late '50's. The
        argument that they "might" have used something like this but we
        haven't found it. leads to the argument that lasers and machine guns
        should be legal because they "might have had them" we "just haven't
        found them yet". It's only period it you can prove it DID
        exist. Otherwise it's speculation.

        3. Practicality. Very. They work very well and are used by many
        sport archers. Not the top competitors as they like a more precise
        feel of the string, but for the rank and file archer they work well.

        If someone asked me to rule on them I would say go ahead, it's legal
        and safe, but know it's not accurate.
        Carolus

        At 10:24 PM 9/17/2007, you wrote:

        >Actually, they are marketed as "No-Glove Finger Savers"...
        ><http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402>http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402
        >
        >This last weekend at King's Company of Archers (Calontir) a young
        >Fyrdman next to me on the line was shooting with these on his string
        >(and whipping the holy pants off me score wise... he was very skilled!!)
        >and I have to say, that they look super but before I run out and order a
        >pair I've gotta ask on three fronts: 1) legality, 2) periodness, 3)
        >practicality.
        >
        >1. Legality:
        >
        >How are these regarded both according to the rules and by other archers.
        >
        >2. Periodness:
        >
        >I could very well see someone trying to pad their string just as a
        >personal innovation, but is there any evidence of it being done? I
        >could see this being done in casual and sport archery but not in combat
        >or hunting archery where the perishable and critical string is something
        >you keep protected in an oil packet and only bring out and tension when
        >you're going to be using it. I've no evidence to back this up, but it
        >would seem something that might come about as a competitive archery
        >innovation among those not trying to put a meal on the table or doing
        >their required practice for battle readiness, and also, as such,
        >something would likely be a later innovation. Just speculation...
        >please correct me if you know the facts. I'd like to learn.
        >
        >3. Practicality:
        >
        >Do any of you have opinions on their actual use.. I.e., do they hold
        >up well? Are they sufficient enough that a glove or tab may be
        >eliminated entirely? I assume they roll off nicely, but does this make
        >them prone to 'slips' or unintentional loosing of an arrow?
        >
        >Thanks for any feedback.
        >
        >--
        >
        >// Merry
        >
        >----------
        >"Merry" Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
        >Shire of Standing Stones, University of Missouri at Columbia
        >Formerly known as Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
        >Mundanely known as Christian M. Cepel
        ><http://Thistledowne.org/>http://Thistledowne.org/
        >http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
        >
        >'Toirdhealbhach' or modernly Anglicized 'Turlough'
        >Is pronounced as 'tur-low' or tur-logh'
        >
        >
        >
        >No virus found in this incoming message.
        >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        >Version: 7.5.487 / Virus Database: 269.13.22/1013 - Release Date:
        >9/17/2007 1:29 PM


        --
        No virus found in this outgoing message.
        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        Version: 7.5.487 / Virus Database: 269.13.22/1013 - Release Date: 9/17/2007 1:29 PM
      • jameswolfden
        1. Legality There is nothing that forbids them that I am aware of. They substitute as a glove and can give the appearance of shooting a bow without gloves. I
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 17, 2007
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          1. Legality

          There is nothing that forbids them that I am aware of. They substitute as a glove and can
          give the appearance of shooting a bow without gloves. I would sooner see people use
          them than shoot with just their fingers.

          Naturally, you are going to check with your branch archer to see if it is different in your
          area.

          2. Periodness

          I have seen nothing that would indicate they were used in period and I doubt that they
          were used. Gloves are easily documented. I have also seen one reference to tab dug up
          and dated back to 15th Century in Soar's The Crooked Stick. We can speculate all we want
          but I wouldn't spend too much time worry about the periodness.

          Now if you are trying to emulate period pictures of archers in War not wearing any gloves
          but still wanted to maintain some feeling in your fingers at the end of shooting archery
          this is the route I would go.

          3. Practicality

          Well, you just saw someone using them and shooting wonderfully. I doubt it was the no-
          glove but the no-glove was obviously not a hinderance. They are on my daughter's old
          youth bow. They are great for kids and I would recommend them to scout camps for their
          youth bows. Sure beats replacing gloves and tabs that disappear.

          Hmm, I think I might go out and buy some for our loaner bows. Also helps teach
          newcomers proper string position and minimizes the chance of pinching the arrow.

          In Service,
          James Wolfden

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
          <Merry@...> wrote:
          >
          > Actually, they are marketed as "No-Glove Finger Savers"...
          > http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402
          >
          > This last weekend at King's Company of Archers (Calontir) a young
          > Fyrdman next to me on the line was shooting with these on his string
          > (and whipping the holy pants off me score wise... he was very skilled!!)
          > and I have to say, that they look super but before I run out and order a
          > pair I've gotta ask on three fronts: 1) legality, 2) periodness, 3)
          > practicality.
          >
          > 1. Legality:
          >
          > How are these regarded both according to the rules and by other archers.
          >
          > 2. Periodness:
          >
          > I could very well see someone trying to pad their string just as a
          > personal innovation, but is there any evidence of it being done? I
          > could see this being done in casual and sport archery but not in combat
          > or hunting archery where the perishable and critical string is something
          > you keep protected in an oil packet and only bring out and tension when
          > you're going to be using it. I've no evidence to back this up, but it
          > would seem something that might come about as a competitive archery
          > innovation among those not trying to put a meal on the table or doing
          > their required practice for battle readiness, and also, as such,
          > something would likely be a later innovation. Just speculation...
          > please correct me if you know the facts. I'd like to learn.
          >
          > 3. Practicality:
          >
          > Do any of you have opinions on their actual use.. I.e., do they hold
          > up well? Are they sufficient enough that a glove or tab may be
          > eliminated entirely? I assume they roll off nicely, but does this make
          > them prone to 'slips' or unintentional loosing of an arrow?
          >
          > Thanks for any feedback.
          >
          > --
          >
          > // Merry
          >
          > ----------
          > "Merry" Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
          > Shire of Standing Stones, University of Missouri at Columbia
          > Formerly known as Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
          > Mundanely known as Christian M. Cepel
          > http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/
          >
          > 'Toirdhealbhach' or modernly Anglicized 'Turlough'
          > Is pronounced as 'tur-low' or tur-logh'
          >
        • Oakes, George
          Greetings Merry, I can only answer the question reguarding the use of said item. I had a set on my compound bow many, many, many moons ago. And while I liked
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 18, 2007
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            Greetings Merry,

            I can only answer the question reguarding the use of said item. I had a
            set on my compound bow many, many, many moons ago. And while I liked
            them at the time, I eventually grew up and removed them from the bow
            string. There wasnt any problem with them for the most part. They did
            make the string go more to the side as they rolled of the fingers, so
            the string would deflect more, causing the arrow to do the same. sure it
            was only an 1/8 th of an inch or so, but any string deflection at the
            bow translates into a huge deflection at the target. Just my opinion of
            course, i prefer the tab or glove, and really prefer the tab, because I
            can use my fingers to do other things where I would have to remove the
            glove to do similar things.

            Starting out, I could see that they would be easier on the fingers, and
            by the end of my last practice, I could really feel the tips of my
            fingers starting to hurt. But it has been a while, and my shoulder feels
            the same.

            As for the other questions, just guessing here, but Periodness, I would
            tend to lean towards the NOT period, as for legality, HMMMM that is for
            the kingdome to decide, if they have not already made a ruling.

            Good luck
            Gavin

            ________________________________

            From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
            Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 1:24 AM
            To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com; Calontam@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [SCA-Archery] Bowstring finger pads.



            Actually, they are marketed as "No-Glove Finger Savers"...
            http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402
            <http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402>

            This last weekend at King's Company of Archers (Calontir) a young
            Fyrdman next to me on the line was shooting with these on his string
            (and whipping the holy pants off me score wise... he was very skilled!!)

            and I have to say, that they look super but before I run out and order a

            pair I've gotta ask on three fronts: 1) legality, 2) periodness, 3)
            practicality.

            1. Legality:

            How are these regarded both according to the rules and by other archers.

            2. Periodness:

            I could very well see someone trying to pad their string just as a
            personal innovation, but is there any evidence of it being done? I
            could see this being done in casual and sport archery but not in combat
            or hunting archery where the perishable and critical string is something

            you keep protected in an oil packet and only bring out and tension when
            you're going to be using it. I've no evidence to back this up, but it
            would seem something that might come about as a competitive archery
            innovation among those not trying to put a meal on the table or doing
            their required practice for battle readiness, and also, as such,
            something would likely be a later innovation. Just speculation...
            please correct me if you know the facts. I'd like to learn.

            3. Practicality:

            Do any of you have opinions on their actual use.. I.e., do they hold
            up well? Are they sufficient enough that a glove or tab may be
            eliminated entirely? I assume they roll off nicely, but does this make
            them prone to 'slips' or unintentional loosing of an arrow?

            Thanks for any feedback.

            --

            // Merry

            ----------
            "Merry" Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
            Shire of Standing Stones, University of Missouri at Columbia
            Formerly known as Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
            Mundanely known as Christian M. Cepel
            http://Thistledowne.org/ <http://Thistledowne.org/>
            http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/ <http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/>

            'Toirdhealbhach' or modernly Anglicized 'Turlough'
            Is pronounced as 'tur-low' or tur-logh'






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John and Carol Atkins
            Merry, The discussion of legality of these finger pads, No Gloves is the brand name, has occured here in Atlantia and the official ruling is that they are
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 18, 2007
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              Merry,
              The discussion of legality of these finger pads, No Gloves is the
              brand name, has occured here in Atlantia and the "official" ruling
              is that they are legal. The issue of multiple nocking points came
              up as an argument against them but when you consider that they can
              be moved up and down the string fairly easily then they really don't
              serve as a nocking point. (We also had this discussion about string
              silencers as pertaining to the inability to inspect that 1/8 inch of
              string covered by the silencers or that they may, in some remote
              way, cause an advantage. Needless to say they are also legal in
              Atlantia.)

              Periodness - no comment, well convered by others.

              Usefullness - We have one person in our group who uses them
              exclusively. It strikes me that due to the extra thickness of the
              pad it tends to cause the string to be pulled sideways during
              release. The only reason I say this is this one individual's arrows
              seem to "swim" down range. He has tried a variety of arrows and
              spine weights and still seems to get this swim. His technique does
              not indicate anything that would be the cause of the swim. So I
              make my comments purely on observations. If someone was using them
              and beating the pants off the rest of the archers, I would be more
              inclined to think that that particular archer was just a very good
              archer. Using traditional equipment is more reliant on skill and
              technique than using training bows (you know, those bows with the
              trainer wheels on them - archer humor!)

              cog
            • ld.blackmoon
              greetings 1: they are considered legal in the open division here in ansteorra . 2: not in any way period . 3: they work really well for begining archers and
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 18, 2007
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                greetings


                1:
                they are considered legal in the open division here in ansteorra .
                2:
                not in any way period .
                3:
                they work really well for begining archers and children , who tend to pinch the arrow making it swing out when they draw .
                with these in place , they can't do that.
                but they do slow your speed rounds way down.
                also, i'm told , don't leave them out in the sun when temps are triple digit , they get soft .

                hope that helps

                be safe, be happy, have fun
                arthur blackmoon

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
                To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com ; Calontam@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, September 17, 2007 11:24 PM
                Subject: [SCA-Archery] Bowstring finger pads.


                Actually, they are marketed as "No-Glove Finger Savers"...
                http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402

                This last weekend at King's Company of Archers (Calontir) a young
                Fyrdman next to me on the line was shooting with these on his string
                (and whipping the holy pants off me score wise... he was very skilled!!)
                and I have to say, that they look super but before I run out and order a
                pair I've gotta ask on three fronts: 1) legality, 2) periodness, 3)
                practicality.

                1. Legality:

                How are these regarded both according to the rules and by other archers.

                2. Periodness:

                I could very well see someone trying to pad their string just as a
                personal innovation, but is there any evidence of it being done? I
                could see this being done in casual and sport archery but not in combat
                or hunting archery where the perishable and critical string is something
                you keep protected in an oil packet and only bring out and tension when
                you're going to be using it. I've no evidence to back this up, but it
                would seem something that might come about as a competitive archery
                innovation among those not trying to put a meal on the table or doing
                their required practice for battle readiness, and also, as such,
                something would likely be a later innovation. Just speculation...
                please correct me if you know the facts. I'd like to learn.

                3. Practicality:

                Do any of you have opinions on their actual use.. I.e., do they hold
                up well? Are they sufficient enough that a glove or tab may be
                eliminated entirely? I assume they roll off nicely, but does this make
                them prone to 'slips' or unintentional loosing of an arrow?

                Thanks for any feedback.

                --

                // Merry

                ----------
                "Merry" Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
                Shire of Standing Stones, University of Missouri at Columbia
                Formerly known as Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
                Mundanely known as Christian M. Cepel
                http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/

                'Toirdhealbhach' or modernly Anglicized 'Turlough'
                Is pronounced as 'tur-low' or tur-logh'






                ------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                No virus found in this incoming message.
                Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                Version: 7.5.487 / Virus Database: 269.13.22/1013 - Release Date: 9/17/2007 1:29 PM


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
                Thank you for all the responses. I wasn t actually trying to justify things as period , but just opening the idea to discussion. I m a strong believer that
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 19, 2007
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                  Thank you for all the responses. I wasn't actually trying to justify
                  things as 'period', but just opening the idea to discussion. I'm a
                  strong believer that most anything we can point to for a date (say..
                  using a bow on a a psaltery [early 1900s]) probably had some either
                  experimental (i.e., some drunk musician acting a fool with his psaltery
                  and his ensemble mate's rebec bow...) or even wide usage well before
                  it's documented 'birth', but that doesn't extend to a belief that it can
                  justify calling something 'period'. My big interest is music and I am
                  amazed at the phenomena of parallel development in that nearly every
                  culture has _some_ example of every major type of instrument no matter
                  how remote and disconnected that culture is. I'm not as amazed when I
                  think to realize that we're all humans with the same capacity for
                  innovation and creativity no matter where we live or in what time
                  period, or when I remind myself that we are all dealing with the same
                  laws of physics and mostly the same fundamental basic construction
                  materials, but still...

                  One respondent outlined some drawbacks with sun and such influences on
                  this particular product. While it wouldn't have the same 'contouring'
                  that these things offer, what would people think of the idea of using
                  strips of heavy mil duct tape (the black 'gorilla' stuff) and making
                  wrappings on the string to the thickness of the least thick part of this
                  product with the wrappings being done in the direction that would not
                  cause the free end to peel back when the finger is dragged across when
                  the string is released. I think there might be a problem with the tape
                  being stiffer and less apt to let the string bend freely, but if two
                  separate wrappings were done for the medular and anular fingers with a
                  bit of space between it might free that up... Even w/o such a
                  concession, I don't think it would cause any real trouble except that if
                  the wrappings were flexed a lot they might start coming un-adhesived.

                  It certainly would be a cheap way to experiment, though the sun-heat
                  problem would still exist. While Duct tape adhesive is much better than
                  say electrical tape about not being sticky and not flowing when warmer,
                  it is not free of those drawbacks. I would certainly want to do it on a
                  well waxed serving so I could adjust vertical height and so there would
                  be little interaction between the adhesive on the first layer and the
                  string.

                  Thoughts?

                  // "Merry" T------- M------- Lut-- (final name submission to Heralds
                  pending :) )

                  'Merry' Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre wrote:
                  >
                  > Actually, they are marketed as "No-Glove Finger Savers"...
                  > http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402
                  > <http://www.3riversarchery.com/Product.asp?c=1&s=55&p=0&i=5402>
                  >
                  > This last weekend at King's Company of Archers (Calontir) a young
                  > Fyrdman next to me on the line was shooting with these on his string
                  > (and whipping the holy pants off me score wise... he was very skilled!!)
                  > and I have to say, that they look super but before I run out and order a
                  > pair I've gotta ask on three fronts: 1) legality, 2) periodness, 3)
                  > practicality.
                  >
                  > 1. Legality:
                  >
                  > How are these regarded both according to the rules and by other archers.
                  >
                  > 2. Periodness:
                  >
                  > I could very well see someone trying to pad their string just as a
                  > personal innovation, but is there any evidence of it being done? I
                  > could see this being done in casual and sport archery but not in combat
                  > or hunting archery where the perishable and critical string is something
                  > you keep protected in an oil packet and only bring out and tension when
                  > you're going to be using it. I've no evidence to back this up, but it
                  > would seem something that might come about as a competitive archery
                  > innovation among those not trying to put a meal on the table or doing
                  > their required practice for battle readiness, and also, as such,
                  > something would likely be a later innovation. Just speculation...
                  > please correct me if you know the facts. I'd like to learn.
                  >
                  > 3. Practicality:
                  >
                  > Do any of you have opinions on their actual use.. I.e., do they hold
                  > up well? Are they sufficient enough that a glove or tab may be
                  > eliminated entirely? I assume they roll off nicely, but does this make
                  > them prone to 'slips' or unintentional loosing of an arrow?
                  >
                  > Thanks for any feedback.
                  >
                  > --
                  >
                  > // Merry
                  >
                  > ----------
                  > "Merry" Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
                  > Shire of Standing Stones, University of Missouri at Columbia
                  > Formerly known as Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
                  > Mundanely known as Christian M. Cepel
                  > http://Thistledowne.org/ <http://Thistledowne.org/>
                  > http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/ <http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/>
                  >
                  > 'Toirdhealbhach' or modernly Anglicized 'Turlough'
                  > Is pronounced as 'tur-low' or tur-logh'
                  >
                  >

                  --

                  // Merry

                  ----------
                  "Merry" Toirdhealbhach Merrywoder Lutre
                  Shire of Standing Stones, University of Missouri at Columbia
                  Formerly known as Philippe Sebastian LeLutre
                  Mundanely known as Christian M. Cepel
                  http://Thistledowne.org/ http://ShireOfStandingStones.org/

                  'Toirdhealbhach' or modernly Anglicized 'Turlough'
                  Is pronounced as 'tur-low' or tur-logh'




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • jameswolfden
                  My thought is that I would just go with the No-Gloves rather than trying to make something similar with duct tape. The No-Gloves are only $5 and I can pick
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 19, 2007
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                    My thought is that I would just go with the No-Gloves rather than
                    trying to make something similar with duct tape. The No-Gloves are
                    only $5 and I can pick them up at a local archery store. If you
                    don't like them, pass them onto a newbie or young shooter that might
                    find them useful. I am not really worried about the drawbacks of the
                    sun. I think the duct tape would be more affected by the sun than No-
                    Gloves would be.

                    My personal choice,though, would be to go with a shooting glove
                    though I do like the idea of putting them on loaner gear. It beats
                    having loaner gloves that go walking.

                    James

                    --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, 'Merry' Toirdhealbhach
                    Merrywoder Lutre <Merry@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > One respondent outlined some drawbacks with sun and such
                    influences on
                    > this particular product. While it wouldn't have the
                    same 'contouring'
                    > that these things offer, what would people think of the idea of
                    using
                    > strips of heavy mil duct tape (the black 'gorilla' stuff) and
                    making
                    > wrappings on the string to the thickness of the least thick part
                    of this
                    > product with the wrappings being done in the direction that would
                    not
                    > cause the free end to peel back when the finger is dragged across
                    when
                    > the string is released. I think there might be a problem with the
                    tape
                    > being stiffer and less apt to let the string bend freely, but if
                    two
                    > separate wrappings were done for the medular and anular fingers
                    with a
                    > bit of space between it might free that up... Even w/o such a
                    > concession, I don't think it would cause any real trouble except
                    that if
                    > the wrappings were flexed a lot they might start coming un-
                    adhesived.
                    >
                    > It certainly would be a cheap way to experiment, though the sun-
                    heat
                    > problem would still exist. While Duct tape adhesive is much
                    better than
                    > say electrical tape about not being sticky and not flowing when
                    warmer,
                    > it is not free of those drawbacks. I would certainly want to do
                    it on a
                    > well waxed serving so I could adjust vertical height and so there
                    would
                    > be little interaction between the adhesive on the first layer and
                    the
                    > string.
                    >
                    > Thoughts?
                    >
                  • Teagus
                    I have made hundreds of strings at Pennsics over the years. I can t ever remember being asked for No-gloves for an archer who could find a glove that fits. I
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 20, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I have made hundreds of strings at Pennsics over the years. I can't
                      ever remember being asked for No-gloves for an archer who could find a
                      glove that fits. I always stock No-gloves for the youth archer. I find
                      the young have coordination problems with tabs and gloves only come so
                      small.
                      Some tips on installing No-gloves. They are best installed while the
                      string is being made. Pulling a string through them is very hard after
                      the end loops are finished. Serve the ends where the loops are, remove
                      string from jig, pull string through No-glove, put stirng back on jig,
                      close loops, center serve, slide No-glove into position. A large, heavy
                      paperclip works to pull the string through the No-glove. Common
                      dishwashing soap is a good lube that can be washed off. I will not
                      attempt putting them on a finished string. Holes are too small.
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