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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: archery illustrations: Shooting Technique???

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  • caleb@buffnet.net
    ... I think it s a case of artistic perspective. Caleb Reynolds
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 5, 2007
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      > Looking at the first illustration from the Maj. Bible:
      > http://www1.tip.nl/~t401243/mac/mac10rA.jpg
      >
      > Any thoughts as to the shooting style on that crossbow? Holding it
      > behind the nut, holding the bow part oriented vertically, or the
      > behind-the-head release? For an archery tradition culture, the
      > vertical oriented bow, especially in a castle defense situation where
      > you want your archers lined up close together, that seems plausible,
      > but I have my questions as to artistic license/ignorance with the other
      > two parts.
      >
      > Logan
      >


      I think it's a case of artistic perspective.

      Caleb Reynolds
    • Jeff Morton
      Note also that all figures are roughly the same size regardless of distance, and all objects are shown in their classic profile. Axes, swords, daggers, and
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 5, 2007
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        Note also that all figures are roughly the same size regardless of
        distance, and all objects are shown in their classic profile. Axes,
        swords, daggers, and flags are all shown with their classic profiles
        as though they were diagrams in a book. The artist was clearly
        depicting an event without a lot of perspective or realism. Drawing
        the crossbow that way clearly shows it is a crossbow without showing
        you how the archer was actually using it. I'd say the archer was
        placed there because the archer wanted to depict archers on the tower
        shooting with crossbows, but not saying any more than that.

        On 9/5/07, logantheboweyder <logantheboweyder@...> wrote:
        > Looking at the first illustration from the Maj. Bible:
        > http://www1.tip.nl/~t401243/mac/mac10rA.jpg
        >
        > Any thoughts as to the shooting style on that crossbow? Holding it
        > behind the nut, holding the bow part oriented vertically, or the
        > behind-the-head release? For an archery tradition culture, the
        > vertical oriented bow, especially in a castle defense situation where
        > you want your archers lined up close together, that seems plausible,
        > but I have my questions as to artistic license/ignorance with the
        > other two parts.
        >
        > Logan
      • Ko
        I also seriously doubt any of these scribes knew which end of the bow was up. They would have just drawn what the bow looked like but now how to shoot them.
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 5, 2007
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          I also seriously doubt any of these scribes knew which end of the bow
          was up. They would have just drawn what the bow looked like but now how
          to shoot them.
        • Siegfried
          Having studied more period illustrations of crossbows than I care to admit ... It s the medieval perspective ... Crossbows were almost always drawn with the
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 5, 2007
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            Having studied more period illustrations of crossbows than I care to admit
            ...

            It's the 'medieval perspective' ... Crossbows were almost always drawn with
            the prod shown as if from a top view ... and often with a trigger coming off
            downwards, or to the side, in a way that would be impossible.

            It was simply the medieval artists way of making sure you knew it was a
            crossbow. The concept of drawing things exact to a perspective, didn't
            arrive until much later.

            Same goes for the way the guy is holding it ... both hands behind the string
            ... that way his arms don't hide the crossbow string.

            Siegfried


            On 9/5/07, logantheboweyder <logantheboweyder@...> wrote:
            >
            > Looking at the first illustration from the Maj. Bible:
            > http://www1.tip.nl/~t401243/mac/mac10rA.jpg
            >
            > Any thoughts as to the shooting style on that crossbow? Holding it
            > behind the nut, holding the bow part oriented vertically, or the
            > behind-the-head release? For an archery tradition culture, the
            > vertical oriented bow, especially in a castle defense situation where
            > you want your archers lined up close together, that seems plausible,
            > but I have my questions as to artistic license/ignorance with the
            > other two parts.
            >
            > Logan
            >
            > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, John edgerton <sirjon1@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Here is a web site with some period archery illustrations.
            > >
            > > http://www.larsdatter.com/archers.htm
            > >
            > > Jon
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >


            --
            ________________________________________________________
            Siegfried Sebastian Faust - http://crossbows.biz/
            Barony of Highland Foorde - Kingdom of Atlantia
            Society Combat Archery Marshal


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John and Carol Atkins
            Looking at the picture I would agree with the idea of artistic impression. I have seen many hand bow pictures where the archer was crossed up . That is to
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 5, 2007
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              Looking at the picture I would agree with the idea of artistic
              impression. I have seen many hand bow pictures where the archer
              was "crossed up". That is to say the leading foot was the wrong
              foot. To shoot in this manner one would have to stand "normal", right
              hand shooter with left foot forward, then twist completely around and
              fire backwards. While Byron Ferguson does this, I just don't see the
              advantage of this technique in war. Artistic impression of an artist
              who has never shot anything more than a paint brush. Or then, as my
              lady is an illuminist, perhaps they just tipped their lead based paint
              brushes a time or two too much!

              cog
            • Ko
              Hope she s not reading this or you may find some lead based paint in your soup. ... right ... paint
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 7, 2007
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                Hope she's not reading this or you may find some lead based paint in
                your soup.

                --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "John and Carol Atkins"
                <cogworks@...> wrote:
                >
                > Looking at the picture I would agree with the idea of artistic
                > impression. I have seen many hand bow pictures where the archer
                > was "crossed up". That is to say the leading foot was the wrong
                > foot. To shoot in this manner one would have to stand "normal",
                right
                > hand shooter with left foot forward, then twist completely around and
                > fire backwards. While Byron Ferguson does this, I just don't see the
                > advantage of this technique in war. Artistic impression of an artist
                > who has never shot anything more than a paint brush. Or then, as my
                > lady is an illuminist, perhaps they just tipped their lead based
                paint
                > brushes a time or two too much!
                >
                > cog
                >
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